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NEWS
July 2, 1993
The life sentence meted out Tuesday to Bernard Eric Miller for the Sept. 8 murder of Pam Basu was entirely appropriate given the brutal nature of the crime. Dr. Basu was dragged to her death after being forced from her BMW at an intersection near her home in Savage; repercussions of the crime were felt nationwide and prompted state and federal officials to toughen carjacking laws.Miller faced a maximum sentence of life in prison without parole. But he was protected from the death penalty because he was only 16 at the time.
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NEWS
By Larry Carson, The Baltimore Sun | March 10, 2011
Prospects for rising income tax revenues are improving for Howard County, an economist told the county panel that will recommend spending and borrowing decisions for the next county budget, though dangers of a renewed decline remain potent. "For the next two years, off a low base of incomes, this county looks pretty good, we think," economist Anirban Basu told the county Spending Affordability Committee on Wednesday morning at the George Howard Building. "That doesn't mean the county should go on a spending frenzy … but things will be less worse.
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NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | August 19, 1993
You cannot look at Steve Basu. Not directly. Not in the eyes. Not for long. You cannot look at Steve Basu, without imagining, in the split second he comes within your gaze, the nightmare he has lived for the last 346 days. You cannot look without wondering how he goes on. And you cannot look without feeling, in some quiet corner of your conscience, a good bit of shame.Yesterday, Steve Basu sat with his head bowed at times and his palms pressed against the cool wood of the gallery benches of Courtroom 12 in Baltimore County Circuit Court.
NEWS
March 3, 2011
Economist Anirban Basu claimed that high corporate income taxes are one reason for Maryland's "inability to grow manufacturing ("Maryland's Economic Forecast Calls for Pain" Feb. 28). Nonsense. Mr. Basu ignores the fact that, in 2001, Maryland enacted an enormous tax break for Maryland-based manufacturers that ensures that their profits are taxed only in proportion to the companies' in-state sales. As a result, a Maryland manufacturer with all its customers in other states (say, a supplier of components to an auto assembly plant in Kentucky)
NEWS
February 18, 1993
It is difficult to imagine anything that would make the carjacking of Pamela Basu last fall more bizarre, more tragic, than it already is. Until this: The Howard County prosecutor, with help from the FBI, is readying for evidence a videotape that Dr. Basu's husband filmed of his wife and child that also inadvertently may show the two men suspected of committing the carjacking later that morning.Biswanath "Steve" Basu was taking movies of preparations for his daughter's first day at pre-school.
NEWS
By Alan J. Craver and Alan J. Craver,Staff Writer | July 21, 1993
Maintaining that he is innocent, a Washington youth serving a life sentence for the carjacking murder of Pam Basu filed court papers to appeal his conviction yesterday.The attorney for 17-year-old Bernard Eric Miller contended that "untruths" stated by prosecutors and rulings by the trial judge prevented his client from receiving a fair trial."We continue to maintain that he is not guilty of all the charges," said Laurack D. Bray, a Washington attorney for Miller.Miller was sentenced to life in prison in June, following his conviction for the Sept.
NEWS
December 14, 1993
The attorney for one of two men convicted in the carjacking death of Pam Basu asked the Maryland Court of Special Appeals yesterday for a trial transcript to prepare an appeal of the conviction.Bernard Miller was sentenced to life plus 10 years for the death of Mrs. Basu, of Savage, in September 1992. Mrs. Basu was dragged to her death when her arm became entangled in a seat belt when she was forced from her car. She was trying to free her 22-month-old daughter, who was in the car with Miller and Rodney Eugene Solomon.
NEWS
By Rafael Alvarez and Rafael Alvarez,Staff Writer | September 13, 1992
BETHESDA -- The tinkling of wind chimes and the sweet aroma of incense burning atop of the coffin of Pam Basu floated through the thick crowd of her mourners yesterday as hundreds of friends and relatives said goodbye to her in English and Hindi, a language of her native India.Priests and family members sprinkled water over Dr. Basu's casket, graced with her wedding gown and photographs of her, to signify the eternity of her spirit."We have something sacred to fulfill here," said Dr. S. J. Bhattacharya, one of two Hindu ministers who presided over the service preceding the Howard County woman's cremation.
NEWS
By Alan J. Craver and Alan J. Craver,Staff Writer | April 13, 1993
Pam Basu shouted for her child and struggled to run alongside her stolen BMW as two men pulled away with her young daughter still inside, a prosecutor told jurors yesterday."
NEWS
By Alan J. Craver and Alan J. Craver,Staff Writer | August 7, 1993
A neighbor of Pam Basu testified yesterday that Rodney Solomon stood watching Dr. Basu put her young daughter into her BMW minutes before she was forced from her car and dragged to her death.Another witness identified Mr. Solomon as the driver of the car, countering a defense lawyer's opening statements Thursday that a teen-age co-defendant was the driver.Mr. Solomon, 27, of Washington would face the death penalty if convicted of first-degree murder and 18 other counts brought in connection with the Sept.
NEWS
By Don Markus | don.markus@baltsun.com | April 10, 2010
A man convicted in the 1992 carjacking death of a Savage woman has won a new opportunity to appeal - more than 17 years into a life sentence for murder. Howard County Circuit Judge Diane O. Leasure ruled Friday that Bernard Eric Miller received "ineffective" counsel from the pro bono attorney who handled his initial appeal in the killing of Pam Basu. Miller, 34, will now file a new appeal through the Court of Special Appeals, public defender Norm Handwerger said. Deputy State's Attorney Todd Taylor expressed confidence that Miller's 1993 conviction for murder, kidnapping and other charges would be upheld.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins and Jamie Smith Hopkins,jamie.smith.hopkins@baltsun.com | August 22, 2009
Maryland employers added thousands of jobs last month, a sign that prospects could be improving for out-of-work residents, though unemployment continued to rise. The Labor Department estimated Friday that companies created 10,000 jobs between June and July, adjusted for seasonal variations. That's an unusually large number - the biggest increase in four years - but economists cautioned that the picture is probably skewed by the agency's attempt to account for normal hiring and layoff patterns in these abnormal economic times.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes and Gus G. Sentementes,gus.sentementes@baltsun.com | November 4, 2008
Anirban Basu, a regional economist, used the top presidential candidates' own words to highlight significant differences in their economic and tax policies before an audience of more than 300 Baltimore-area business leaders yesterday. In a follow-up presentation before members of the Greater Baltimore Committee, Richard M. Cripps, a financial markets expert with Stifel, Nicolaus & Co., struck an optimistic note by noting how the U.S. investment markets have rebounded over the long term since the Depression.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins and Jamie Smith Hopkins,jamie.smith.hopkins@baltsun.com | October 11, 2008
The decline in home prices in the Baltimore metro area accelerated last month - the average fell below the 2005 figure - but the hemorrhaging in sales came to a near-halt. The average sale price in Baltimore and its five surrounding counties dropped to about $296,000, according to numbers released yesterday by Rockville-based Metropolitan Regional Information Systems. That's down nearly 6 percent from a year ago. And it's $7,500 less than sellers got in September 2005, at the height of the buying frenzy.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins and Jamie Smith Hopkins,Sun reporter | November 9, 2007
Local homebuilders eager for good news instead heard sobering predictions about the housing market yesterday: Both national and local economists told them that the worst is yet to come. The most optimistic speaker at the Home Builders Association of Maryland's annual forecast conference was the National Association of Home Builders' director of forecasting, who predicts a bottoming out in the middle of next year. Freddie Mac's chief economist expects it around the end of next year. Baltimore economist Anirban Basu said not until 2009, possibly the middle of that year.
BUSINESS
By HANAH CHO | October 10, 2007
It's tough being a young professional in Baltimore. Actually, anywhere, for that matter. That's according to local economist Anirban Basu, who spoke to a group of 20-something professionals on the economics of being young at an event last week sponsored by the Maryland Business Council. The reason? "In today's policymaking environment, young people are treated so poorly," argues Basu, chairman and chief executive of Sage Policy Group Inc., a Baltimore economic and policy consulting firm.
NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,Staff Writer | July 13, 1993
Defense attorneys for a Washington man charged with the carjacking murder of Pam Basu failed in their attempts yesterday to have prosecutors' requests for the death penalty withdrawn.Baltimore County Circuit Judge Dana M. Levitz refused yesterday to withdraw the notice of the Howard County state's attorney's office to seek the maximum sentence against Rodney Eugene Solomon.Mr. Solomon, 27, is scheduled to stand trial on Aug. 2 on 19 counts, including first-degree murder, in the Sept. 8 slaying Dr. Basu, a resident of Savage.
NEWS
By Alan J. Craver and Alan J. Craver,Staff Writer | August 18, 1993
Pleading for mercy and compassion, Rodney Eugene Solomon urged a jury yesterday to spare him the death penalty for his role in the carjacking murder of Howard County research scientist Pam Basu.Solomon, convicted of first-degree murder last week, said he never intended to kill Dr. Basu, who was forced from her car near her Savage home, then dragged nearly two miles to her death on Sept. 8, 1992, after her arm became entangled in a seat belt harness.Solomon, 27, of Washington, made his statement before a Baltimore County Circuit Court jury that must decide today whether to sentence him to die in Maryland's gas chamber or send him to prison for the rest of his life.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins and Jamie Smith Hopkins,Sun reporter | September 26, 2007
Maryland's employment market performed relatively well last month at a time of economic instability, bucking the national trend by adding jobs and cutting unemployment. The jobless rate fell to 3.7 percent, from 4 percent in July, the U.S. Labor Department said yesterday. That's significantly lower than the national rate, which remained at 4.6 percent last month. Employment grew last month by about 3,300 jobs, according to preliminary estimates adjusted for seasonal variations. Nationally, employers cut 4,000 jobs - the first drop in four years, when the country was still suffering from the effects of the 2001 recession.
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