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By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 16, 2000
Two contrasting works by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart will be performed by the Annapolis Chorale at Maryland Hall at 8 p.m. Saturday. For rollicking good fun, there is the Concerto for Bassoon, to be conducted by J. Ernest Green and played by the chorale's chamber orchestra and soloist Danny Phipps, principal bassoon of the Air Force Band, which has its headquarters in Washington. A graduate of Philadelphia's Curtis Institute and Catholic University, Phipps, a faculty member at Shenandoah University in Winchester, Va., is one of the region's most-sought-after bassoonists.
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NEWS
By Janice D'Arcy and Janice D'Arcy,SUN STAFF | March 5, 2005
Dr. Arthur L. Gudwin, a vascular surgeon and professional bassoonist who was also a sailor, stunt pilot and crab cake connoisseur, died Tuesday of complications from surgery to remove a brain tumor. The Severna Park resident was 67. "He found his passion in everything," said Dr. Paul Rosoff, his longtime friend and fellow surgeon. Dr. Gudwin's first career was surgery. He retired in 1999 as chief of vascular surgery at North Arundel Hospital, and also served as president of the Anne Arundel County Medical Society.
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FEATURES
By Peter Krask and Peter Krask,Special to the Evening Sun | August 15, 1991
SOME PEOPLE think of the bassoon as the Rodney Dangerfield of concert instruments. It seldom gets any respect. Something about its sound and shape makes it hard to take seriously.The approximately 300 bassoonists who are mem- bers of the International Double Reed Society would like you to think otherwise. They are not kidding. Look in their bible and you'll find a warning, strict as any federal law or edict. This bible -- all five volumes of it -- takes up half of a library shelf."Bassoons should be kept out of the hands of children and unauthorized persons; they are not toys for the ignorant."
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | March 5, 2004
As the Baltimore Chamber Orchestra continues grading music-director candidates - four finalists, out of 177 applicants, are guest-conducting this season - I wonder if any will get extra-credit points. Apo Hsu, who led Wednesday's concert at Kraushaar Auditorium, deserves a few for her programming choices. Three of the four items were from the corners of the repertoire, a couple far out in left field. Given all the play-it-safe concerts these days, such departures cannot be praised enough.
NEWS
December 2, 1990
The Susquehanna Symphony Orchestra, under the direction of Sheldon Bair, will present "Music for the Season" at 8 p.m. Saturday, Dec. 8, at Fallston High School.In addition to seasonal favorites, the program will include Vivaldi's "Concerto in E Minor for Bassoon and Orchestra," featuring Judith Brand.The conclusion of the concert will be excerpts from Handel's "Messiah," with the Harford Choral Society joining the symphony.Proceeds will benefit Holy Family House.Information: 838-6465.
NEWS
By Janice D'Arcy and Janice D'Arcy,SUN STAFF | March 5, 2005
Dr. Arthur L. Gudwin, a vascular surgeon and professional bassoonist who was also a sailor, stunt pilot and crab cake connoisseur, died Tuesday of complications from surgery to remove a brain tumor. The Severna Park resident was 67. "He found his passion in everything," said Dr. Paul Rosoff, his longtime friend and fellow surgeon. Dr. Gudwin's first career was surgery. He retired in 1999 as chief of vascular surgery at North Arundel Hospital, and also served as president of the Anne Arundel County Medical Society.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | March 5, 2004
As the Baltimore Chamber Orchestra continues grading music-director candidates - four finalists, out of 177 applicants, are guest-conducting this season - I wonder if any will get extra-credit points. Apo Hsu, who led Wednesday's concert at Kraushaar Auditorium, deserves a few for her programming choices. Three of the four items were from the corners of the repertoire, a couple far out in left field. Given all the play-it-safe concerts these days, such departures cannot be praised enough.
FEATURES
December 16, 1998
Editor's note: Ten instruments take their parts one by one in a musical performance.With mournful moan and silken tone,Itself alone comes ONE TROMBONE.Gliding, sliding, high notes go low;ONE TROMBONE is playing SOLO.Next, a TRUMPET comes along,And sings and stings its swinging song.It joins TROMBONE, no more alone,And ONE and TWO-O, they're a DUO.Fine FRENCH HORN, its valves all oiled,Bright and brassy, loops all coiled,Golden yellow; joins its fellows.TWO, now THREE-O, what a TRIO!Now, a mellow friend, the CELLO,Neck extended, bows a "hello";End pin set upon the floor,It makes up a QUARTET - that's FOUR.
NEWS
By Rafael Alvarez | December 24, 1990
The attorneys are in evening dress, nibbling rare roast beef and Oriental chicken in the stately grandeur of Baltimore's Peabody Library.The mood is set by aged volumes asleep in six floors of stacks that rise to the ceiling in shelves set behind iron grillwork worthy of an opera house.Mary Pat Hughes, squeezed into a little black dress set off by silver high heels, scans the crowd and thinks, perhaps, that a change of pace is in order.What this party needs, she decides, is a right good dose of Little Richard.
FEATURES
By David Donovan and David Donovan,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 22, 1999
"Le Sacre du Printemps" ("The Rite of Spring") is this century's "Eroica" Symphony. After its premiere in Paris in 1913, the musical universe has changed forever. Robert Spano and the Baltimore Symphony gave a very lean and vivacious account of the landmark score Thursday night. It is a great shame that they are only playing this work twice this week because this was one of the BSO's better performances.The tone was perfectly set by the opening bassoon solo played by principal bassoonist Phillip Kolker.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 16, 2000
Two contrasting works by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart will be performed by the Annapolis Chorale at Maryland Hall at 8 p.m. Saturday. For rollicking good fun, there is the Concerto for Bassoon, to be conducted by J. Ernest Green and played by the chorale's chamber orchestra and soloist Danny Phipps, principal bassoon of the Air Force Band, which has its headquarters in Washington. A graduate of Philadelphia's Curtis Institute and Catholic University, Phipps, a faculty member at Shenandoah University in Winchester, Va., is one of the region's most-sought-after bassoonists.
FEATURES
By David Donovan and David Donovan,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 22, 1999
"Le Sacre du Printemps" ("The Rite of Spring") is this century's "Eroica" Symphony. After its premiere in Paris in 1913, the musical universe has changed forever. Robert Spano and the Baltimore Symphony gave a very lean and vivacious account of the landmark score Thursday night. It is a great shame that they are only playing this work twice this week because this was one of the BSO's better performances.The tone was perfectly set by the opening bassoon solo played by principal bassoonist Phillip Kolker.
FEATURES
December 16, 1998
Editor's note: Ten instruments take their parts one by one in a musical performance.With mournful moan and silken tone,Itself alone comes ONE TROMBONE.Gliding, sliding, high notes go low;ONE TROMBONE is playing SOLO.Next, a TRUMPET comes along,And sings and stings its swinging song.It joins TROMBONE, no more alone,And ONE and TWO-O, they're a DUO.Fine FRENCH HORN, its valves all oiled,Bright and brassy, loops all coiled,Golden yellow; joins its fellows.TWO, now THREE-O, what a TRIO!Now, a mellow friend, the CELLO,Neck extended, bows a "hello";End pin set upon the floor,It makes up a QUARTET - that's FOUR.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 26, 1998
The program that the Annapolis Symphony offered last weekend seemed odd for its lack of pizazz.Yet, despite the absence of a popular blockbuster or large-scale symphonic work, the evening was full of eminently enjoyable fare brought off nicely by the local orchestra under the direction of Peter Rubardt, leader of the Pensacola (Fla.) Symphony.What we heard were three seldom-performed works by a trio of contemporaries from the palmy days of fledgling German Romanticism: Felix Mendelssohn, Carl Maria von Weber and Franz Schubert.
FEATURES
By David Donovan and David Donovan,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 7, 1995
The rarely performed "Messa di Gloria" of Giacomo Puccini was given a sterling presentation by the Concert Artists of Baltimore in their opening concert at LeClerc Hall on Saturday night.Artistic director Edward Polochick and his forces made a very strong case that this early Puccini work deserves a bigger place in the choral repertoire.Each of the five movements was perfectly realized.Soloists Paul Cohill, tenor, and Randal Woodfield gave thoughtful, committed performances. Mr. Cohill's voice was a little small, but conductor Polochick was careful not to let the choral and orchestral forces overpower him. The Gloria is the centerpiece of this work, and it was magnificently realized, but the Credo section was simply heavenly.
FEATURES
By Peter Krask and Peter Krask,Special to the Evening Sun | August 15, 1991
SOME PEOPLE think of the bassoon as the Rodney Dangerfield of concert instruments. It seldom gets any respect. Something about its sound and shape makes it hard to take seriously.The approximately 300 bassoonists who are mem- bers of the International Double Reed Society would like you to think otherwise. They are not kidding. Look in their bible and you'll find a warning, strict as any federal law or edict. This bible -- all five volumes of it -- takes up half of a library shelf."Bassoons should be kept out of the hands of children and unauthorized persons; they are not toys for the ignorant."
FEATURES
By David Donovan and David Donovan,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 7, 1995
The rarely performed "Messa di Gloria" of Giacomo Puccini was given a sterling presentation by the Concert Artists of Baltimore in their opening concert at LeClerc Hall on Saturday night.Artistic director Edward Polochick and his forces made a very strong case that this early Puccini work deserves a bigger place in the choral repertoire.Each of the five movements was perfectly realized.Soloists Paul Cohill, tenor, and Randal Woodfield gave thoughtful, committed performances. Mr. Cohill's voice was a little small, but conductor Polochick was careful not to let the choral and orchestral forces overpower him. The Gloria is the centerpiece of this work, and it was magnificently realized, but the Credo section was simply heavenly.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 26, 1998
The program that the Annapolis Symphony offered last weekend seemed odd for its lack of pizazz.Yet, despite the absence of a popular blockbuster or large-scale symphonic work, the evening was full of eminently enjoyable fare brought off nicely by the local orchestra under the direction of Peter Rubardt, leader of the Pensacola (Fla.) Symphony.What we heard were three seldom-performed works by a trio of contemporaries from the palmy days of fledgling German Romanticism: Felix Mendelssohn, Carl Maria von Weber and Franz Schubert.
NEWS
By Rafael Alvarez | December 24, 1990
The attorneys are in evening dress, nibbling rare roast beef and Oriental chicken in the stately grandeur of Baltimore's Peabody Library.The mood is set by aged volumes asleep in six floors of stacks that rise to the ceiling in shelves set behind iron grillwork worthy of an opera house.Mary Pat Hughes, squeezed into a little black dress set off by silver high heels, scans the crowd and thinks, perhaps, that a change of pace is in order.What this party needs, she decides, is a right good dose of Little Richard.
NEWS
December 2, 1990
The Susquehanna Symphony Orchestra, under the direction of Sheldon Bair, will present "Music for the Season" at 8 p.m. Saturday, Dec. 8, at Fallston High School.In addition to seasonal favorites, the program will include Vivaldi's "Concerto in E Minor for Bassoon and Orchestra," featuring Judith Brand.The conclusion of the concert will be excerpts from Handel's "Messiah," with the Harford Choral Society joining the symphony.Proceeds will benefit Holy Family House.Information: 838-6465.
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