Advertisement
HomeCollectionsBassist
IN THE NEWS

Bassist

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
By RASHOD D. OLLISON | April 3, 2008
Marcus Miller is in a happy space these days, and the jazz-pop bassist didn't even have to tell me so. Just listen to his new album, simply titled Marcus. Practically every note glows. "There's a lot of joy in this album," he says. "Every album has a different flavor. This one is more upbeat. I don't know. That's just where I am right now." The two-time Grammy winner, who plays Rams Head Tavern in Annapolis on Monday night, says no particular personal event inspired the mood. At 49, with an acclaimed, lucrative career spanning nearly 30 years, Miller says he just feels more settled, and his musical scope is sharper.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
September 12, 2013
Tizer Quartet plays jazz fusion at Montpelier Arts Center The Tizer Quartet is live in concert Friday, Sept. 13, at 8 p.m. at the Montpelier Arts Center, 9652 Muirkirk Road. This jazz fusion group is led by keyboardist, composer and a Best New Jazz Artist nominee Lao Tizer, and the lineup includes Cheikh N'Doye, a Senagalese bassist now based in Alexandria, Va.; Raul Pineda on drums; and Steve Nieves on sax, percussion and vocals. Tickets are $25 per person. Montpelier members and seniors (60 and older)
Advertisement
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 22, 2002
Jazz, at its heart, may be one of the most improvised of art forms, but some of its most distinguished practitioners believed in maintaining a decorous balance between the written and the unwritten. One such jazzman was John Kirby (1908-1952), a Baltimore-born bassist who joined the celestial Fletcher Henderson Orchestra in 1929 and wound up leading his own marvelously disciplined sextet in some pretty iconoclastic directions. For this ensemble would not only swing, but bridge the gap between popular and classical music thanks to Kirby's ingeniously breezy arrangements of melodies by Beethoven, Schubert, Tchaikovsky and other greats.
NEWS
By Adam Bernstein, The Washington Post | March 8, 2012
Joe Byrd, a bassist who was best known for collaborations with his guitarist brother Charlie and who helped introduce bossa nova-inflected jazz to the United States, died March 6 at Anne Arundel Medical Center from injuries suffered in a car accident that day. He was 78. Mr. Byrd, who also played guitar and was billed early in his career under his given name, Gene, was the youngest of four musical brothers who grew up in Virginia's Tidewater region....
FEATURES
By MINNEAPOLIS STAR TRIBUNE | April 14, 2006
Everything else could be going wrong, and like for that hour and an half, I feel all right. Pete Wentz, bassist for the band Fall Out Boy, on how he feels on stage.
NEWS
September 12, 2013
Tizer Quartet plays jazz fusion at Montpelier Arts Center The Tizer Quartet is live in concert Friday, Sept. 13, at 8 p.m. at the Montpelier Arts Center, 9652 Muirkirk Road. This jazz fusion group is led by keyboardist, composer and a Best New Jazz Artist nominee Lao Tizer, and the lineup includes Cheikh N'Doye, a Senagalese bassist now based in Alexandria, Va.; Raul Pineda on drums; and Steve Nieves on sax, percussion and vocals. Tickets are $25 per person. Montpelier members and seniors (60 and older)
ENTERTAINMENT
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | November 23, 1995
Alternative rock may not have produced much in the way of jam bands, but it does have its share of groups for whom the playing's the thing. Primus and the Meat Puppets are both members of that camp, but each approaches improvisation in a different way.As much as the Meat Puppets might enjoy the acid-rock meanderings that season their live shows, their stock in trade is songwriting, not soloing. Kurt Cobain recognized that before most of America did, and included three Meat Puppets songs ("Lake of Fire," "Oh Me" and "Plateau")
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,Special to The Baltimore Sun | October 18, 2009
A spectacular sold-out concert ushered in the seventh year of Jazz at the Powerhouse, hosted by Elana Byrd. She welcomed audience members Celia Pearson and Karen Fazekas, daughters of Paul Pearson, who first brought jazz to Annapolis in the 1970s at Maryland Inn's King of France Tavern, showcasing for over two decades such artists as Charlie Byrd, Ethel Ennis and Teddy Wilson. Family ties play a part in the continuance of classic jazz in Annapolis. It was bassist Joe Byrd (Charlie's brother)
NEWS
By Adam Bernstein, The Washington Post | March 8, 2012
Joe Byrd, a bassist who was best known for collaborations with his guitarist brother Charlie and who helped introduce bossa nova-inflected jazz to the United States, died March 6 at Anne Arundel Medical Center from injuries suffered in a car accident that day. He was 78. Mr. Byrd, who also played guitar and was billed early in his career under his given name, Gene, was the youngest of four musical brothers who grew up in Virginia's Tidewater region....
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | December 10, 1997
Baltimore's bass line sounds a little thin these days. Some notes seem to be missing from the deep lower registers of our best local music, and the reason, I'm afraid, is written in death notices. Two of the city's finest bass players of the past two decades died within the past three months. They were young, talented, and hooked.Tony DeFontes, who played bass guitar with a lot of terrific bands in Baltimore - Mambo Combo, Gypsy Dawg, Cowboy Jazz, Patti Sullivan group - had just returned from a trip to Colorado when he died in his home in Roland Park in early September.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case, The Baltimore Sun | October 18, 2011
After nine years, one of Baltimore's most revered punk bands, Double Dagger, will call it quits Friday with one final show at the Ottobar . Almost. The group, which consists of singer Nolen Strals, drummer Denny Bowen and bassist Bruce Willen, has plans to record and release a few more songs, though the format is still to be determined. It's a fitting end, as no one expected Double Dagger to go quietly. The band's online farewell statement points out the members are "creative dudes" (Strals and Willen, for example, run the successful design studio Post Typography, whose clients include the New York Times, ESPN Magazine and Time)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sam Sessa, The Baltimore Sun | July 1, 2010
For bassist Victor Wooten, music is a language, just like English. Music should be taught the same way as any other language, and performing it should feel as natural as speaking, he said. It's a philosophy that, in the past three decades, has helped Wooten become regarded as a top bassist. Wooten's work, whether with bluegrass/jazz group Bela Fleck and the Flecktones or on a solo tour, is bringing the electric bass into the limelight and dispelling the stigma of the bass as a secondary instrument.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,Special to The Baltimore Sun | October 18, 2009
A spectacular sold-out concert ushered in the seventh year of Jazz at the Powerhouse, hosted by Elana Byrd. She welcomed audience members Celia Pearson and Karen Fazekas, daughters of Paul Pearson, who first brought jazz to Annapolis in the 1970s at Maryland Inn's King of France Tavern, showcasing for over two decades such artists as Charlie Byrd, Ethel Ennis and Teddy Wilson. Family ties play a part in the continuance of classic jazz in Annapolis. It was bassist Joe Byrd (Charlie's brother)
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,Special to The Baltimore Sun | October 30, 2008
The Joe Byrd Trio and Quartet farewell concerts at Loews Annapolis Powerhouse last weekend were sold out, filled with fans who witnessed the end of an era of authentic, sophisticated American jazz that has been at home in Annapolis the past 40 years. Joe Byrd has been playing bass for 50 years - 40 years with his world-class guitarist brother Charlie Byrd. After Charlie's death in 1999, Joe maintained his style of jazz with administrative support from Elana, his wife of 31 years. Elana Byrd, a lawyer who also acts as her husband's promoter and agent, serves as concert emcee.
ENTERTAINMENT
By RASHOD D. OLLISON | April 3, 2008
Marcus Miller is in a happy space these days, and the jazz-pop bassist didn't even have to tell me so. Just listen to his new album, simply titled Marcus. Practically every note glows. "There's a lot of joy in this album," he says. "Every album has a different flavor. This one is more upbeat. I don't know. That's just where I am right now." The two-time Grammy winner, who plays Rams Head Tavern in Annapolis on Monday night, says no particular personal event inspired the mood. At 49, with an acclaimed, lucrative career spanning nearly 30 years, Miller says he just feels more settled, and his musical scope is sharper.
NEWS
July 20, 2006
John Fenton Mathews, who had held the principal bass chair in the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra for a quarter-century, died of leukemia July 10 at his home in West Brooklin, Maine. The former Bolton Hill resident was 80. Born in Birmingham, Mich., he studied the double bass privately with Gaston Brohan, principal double bassist with the Detroit Symphony Orchestra, and attended summer music camp at Interlochen in Michigan. After two years of study, he took his first symphony job in Dallas.
NEWS
July 20, 2006
John Fenton Mathews, who had held the principal bass chair in the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra for a quarter-century, died of leukemia July 10 at his home in West Brooklin, Maine. The former Bolton Hill resident was 80. Born in Birmingham, Mich., he studied the double bass privately with Gaston Brohan, principal double bassist with the Detroit Symphony Orchestra, and attended summer music camp at Interlochen in Michigan. After two years of study, he took his first symphony job in Dallas.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Pop Music Critic | October 1, 1993
BELIEVE IN MEDuff McKagan (Geffen 46052)Want to know how to tell when a rock act has gotten too big for its britches? Just wait for the guys in the back of the band to release solo albums. So if the news that Guns N' Roses bassist Duff McKagan had an album on the way left you thinking "ego trip," that's all right -- provided you don't let that keep you from actually listening to "Believe in Me." Because instead of sounding like the work of a guy who couldn't get his other band to take his songs seriously, "Believe in Me" is as hard-rocking and credible as any recent GNR project.
FEATURES
By MINNEAPOLIS STAR TRIBUNE | April 14, 2006
Everything else could be going wrong, and like for that hour and an half, I feel all right. Pete Wentz, bassist for the band Fall Out Boy, on how he feels on stage.
FEATURES
By Ernest A. Jasmin and Ernest A. Jasmin,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 11, 2005
It seems reports of Krist Novoselic's retirement were somewhat premature. The Nirvana bassist and political activist recently discussed the possibility of releasing a solo album. In 2003, Novoselic declared that he was quitting the music business in a message posted on the Web site of his most recent group, Eyes Adrift. He was frustrated that the band's alt-country-flavored debut album, released months earlier by indie label spinART, had sold dismally. "As far as the music industry goes, I quit.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.