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Bass Season

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NEWS
By Capt. Bob Spore | November 1, 1991
The Striped Bass Advisory Board met Wednesday evening at Matapeake and recommended that the state reopen the recreational striped bass season beginning tomorrow and Sunday and next Friday, Saturday and Sunday.The daily creel limit will be one fish per angler, and all size limits will remain the same. But the daily closing time has been pushed back to 6 p.m. instead of 8 p.m.Charter boats will be permitted to carry family and friends fishing but not run striped bass charters during the extended season.
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SPORTS
By Don Markus, The Baltimore Sun | October 1, 2011
After tons more striped bass were found to be caught illegally on Maryland's waterways this year — and 60 recreational fishermen were recently contacted by officials of the Department of Natural Resources informing them they could face the prospect of losing their licenses — two open houses have been scheduled for this week so the public and other interested parties can learn of new regulations being considered. Gina Hunt, deputy director of the Fisheries Service for the DNR, said Friday that the open houses are a more relaxed setting "similar to a show at an art gallery" than a public hearing, at which officials take questions and hear comments from interested parties.
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NEWS
By Capt. Bob Spore | March 8, 1991
Maryland's Striped Bass Advisory Board met Monday evening in Annapolis to review briefly a decision by the Department of Natural Resources on the spring striped bass season and begin work on the regulation for the fall season.The DNR has decided to go with a 17-day spring striped bass season beginning May 11 and ending May 27.Anglers will be permitted one striped bass, or rockfish, 36 inches or larger (per person) during the 17-day season. All striped bass fishing must be below the Bay Bridge.
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | April 15, 2011
The state says it's OK to eat more striped bass, but the question today, the opening of the spring season, is whether you'll be able to catch them. In a repeat of last year, high winds are expected to rake the bay, generating three- to five-foot waves and convincing many anglers to remain in safe harbor. For those who love the taste of the firm, white flesh of morone saxatilis , being so close but so far from piscatorial paradise is, well, a form of purgatory. After all, it's been four months since the 2010 season closed.
NEWS
By Capt. Bob Spore | October 19, 1990
The 1990 recreational striped bass season is over, the charter boat season ends tomorrow evening and the commercial season will start later this year.What happened?Why was the season so short? Who caught all the fish? How many fish were caught? These are but a few of the questions I'm receiving from both recreational and charter captains. Most have adopted a cynical attitude: "the state did it to us again." I disagree.I'll admit that I do not have any of the answers, but I have talked to the Department of Natural Resources staff I have known and respected for years.
SPORTS
By CANDUS THOMSON | August 17, 2007
A regional fisheries management board yesterday approved Maryland's request for a two-week spring striped bass season in a shallow area at the mouth of the Susquehanna River. The Maryland Department of Natural Resources proposed the Susquehanna Flats season to give local anglers an opportunity to catch and keep striped bass, also known as rockfish. A similar proposal last spring for a season was rejected by the Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission because it failed to follow review procedures.
NEWS
By Capt. Bob Spore | March 29, 1991
The Administrative, Executive and Legislative Review Committee conducted a hearing Monday as the last stop for the emergency regulation authorizing the trophy striped bass season proposed for May 11-27.The AELR Committee, a standing committee composed of nine members of the Maryland Senate and nine members of the House of Delegates, must approve or disapprove emergency regulations submitted for approval.About 40 charter boat captains and watermen lined up with the Department of Natural Resources for the regulation.
NEWS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,SUN STAFF | April 18, 2004
Long before dawn yesterday, thousands of folks were filling coolers with ice, searching for a lucky hat and envisioning dinner on the grill. After the coldest winter in memory and endless days of rain, the promise of a brilliant spring day on the water proved an irresistible tonic. And it came with a chaser. Yesterday was the opening of the spring striped bass season. When the bright orange sun popped up between the Chesapeake Bay and low-slung clouds about 6:30, it illuminated hundreds of boats, all on a quest for the same thing: silver-sided monsters with black racing stripes.
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | April 15, 2011
The state says it's OK to eat more striped bass, but the question today, the opening of the spring season, is whether you'll be able to catch them. In a repeat of last year, high winds are expected to rake the bay, generating three- to five-foot waves and convincing many anglers to remain in safe harbor. For those who love the taste of the firm, white flesh of morone saxatilis , being so close but so far from piscatorial paradise is, well, a form of purgatory. After all, it's been four months since the 2010 season closed.
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,Sun reporter | May 1, 2007
Anglers will get an extra week of catch-and-release striped bass fishing on the Susquehanna Flats, the sportsmen's paradise where the river meets the Chesapeake Bay. The season, which was supposed to end Thursday, has been extended until midnight May 10, said Marty Gary, a fisheries biologist with the Department of Natural Resources. A cool spring has kept the water well below 65 degrees, the temperature at which fish begin to die more quickly after being caught. Gary said a look at the long-range forecast and consultations with fishing and conservation groups, guides and Natural Resources Police convinced DNR that the catch-and-release season could continue with little harm to the striped bass, also known as rockfish.
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | February 28, 2011
First, poachers took away their livelihoods. Then Maryland watermen battled two days of brutal weather as they tried to salvage the final days of February's striped bass gill net season. The double whammy proved too much. Friday's harvest was 32,346 pounds — about half the daily catch before the season was closed Feb. 4. Monday's tally won't be known until Tuesday afternoon, but traffic was light at check stations up and down the Chesapeake Bay. United Shellfish Co. at Kent Narrows was processing a small amount of fish from other wholesalers to keep workers busy.
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | February 4, 2011
State officials announced Friday that they have raised the stakes in their fight against striped bass poachers who netted 10 tons of fish this week. They closed down the commercial gill net season three weeks early, offered a $7,000 reward and filed legislation to give the Department of Natural Resources more enforcement authority. For two days, Natural Resources Police officers pulled up thousands of yards of submerged net illegally anchored in the fish-rich waters around Kent Island and in the Choptank and Chester rivers.
SPORTS
By From Sun staff and news services | November 1, 2008
Fans roar as Phillies parade through city baseball Manager Charlie Manuel hoisted the World Series trophy yesterday while players basked in a swarm of confetti, the Phanatic mascot danced and hundreds of thousands of Philadelphia Phillies fans roared in celebration of the city's first major sports championship in 25 years. The Phillies, who beat the Tampa Bay Rays in five games to claim this year's championship, won their only other World Series in 1980. Brewers:: Star left-handed pitcher CC Sabathia will soon be receiving a contract offer from the team, general manager Doug Melvin said.
SPORTS
By CANDUS THOMSON | April 20, 2008
ABOARD THE DRIZZLE BAR-- --At 6:08 yesterday morning as he powered up the twin diesels and nosed his 46-foot charter boat toward the Chesapeake Bay, Capt. George Bentz declared the striped bass season open for business. Sadly, it took most of the day for word to filter down to the fish. Not our fault. As Bentz turned into the bay from Bodkin Creek, the sun began its climb above the Eastern Shore, turning from orange to yellow and adding a touch of glitter to the water. The surface was as smooth as a roll of plastic wrap stretched tight below the Bay Bridge, from Matapeake to Annapolis.
SPORTS
By CANDUS THOMSON | August 17, 2007
A regional fisheries management board yesterday approved Maryland's request for a two-week spring striped bass season in a shallow area at the mouth of the Susquehanna River. The Maryland Department of Natural Resources proposed the Susquehanna Flats season to give local anglers an opportunity to catch and keep striped bass, also known as rockfish. A similar proposal last spring for a season was rejected by the Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission because it failed to follow review procedures.
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,Sun reporter | May 9, 2007
State fisheries officials will not extend the catch-and-release striped bass season on the Susquehanna Flats beyond midnight tomorrow. Biologists said yesterday that the water temperature was closing in on the 65-degree threshold where fish begin to die faster when they are removed even briefly from the water. The area, known as "The Flats," is where the river meets the Chesapeake Bay between Harford and Cecil counties. It sits in the middle of the East Coast's largest striped bass nursery, where the large migratory fish stop each spring to spawn on their way north.
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,Sun reporter | May 9, 2007
State fisheries officials will not extend the catch-and-release striped bass season on the Susquehanna Flats beyond midnight tomorrow. Biologists said yesterday that the water temperature was closing in on the 65-degree threshold where fish begin to die faster when they are removed even briefly from the water. The area, known as "The Flats," is where the river meets the Chesapeake Bay between Harford and Cecil counties. It sits in the middle of the East Coast's largest striped bass nursery, where the large migratory fish stop each spring to spawn on their way north.
NEWS
By Capt.Bob Spore | May 10, 1991
"Hooray, hooray, the 11th of May, and outdoor sex begins that day!"We used to sing it, "the first of May," but you get the idea. The trophy rockfish season begins at 5 a.m. tomorrow, the 11th of May, and not a minute sooner.Bureaucrats are not the right folks to be controlling brush fires, and this rockfish situation is burning out of control.Some of it is laughable, and some of it makes you want to cry. It is time to take the Department of Natural Resources out of the rockfish game. Thebureaucrats are panicking.
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,Sun reporter | May 1, 2007
Anglers will get an extra week of catch-and-release striped bass fishing on the Susquehanna Flats, the sportsmen's paradise where the river meets the Chesapeake Bay. The season, which was supposed to end Thursday, has been extended until midnight May 10, said Marty Gary, a fisheries biologist with the Department of Natural Resources. A cool spring has kept the water well below 65 degrees, the temperature at which fish begin to die more quickly after being caught. Gary said a look at the long-range forecast and consultations with fishing and conservation groups, guides and Natural Resources Police convinced DNR that the catch-and-release season could continue with little harm to the striped bass, also known as rockfish.
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