Advertisement
HomeCollectionsBass Player
IN THE NEWS

Bass Player

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
August 9, 2005
On August 7, 2005, JANE LAMAR-SPICKA, beloved wife of George F. Spicka, sister of John R. Brown Jr. Jane was a vocalist and bass player, wrote for Music Monthly Magazine, and performed in the Fabulous 50+ Players. Friends may call at the Mac Nabb Funeral Home, 301 Frederick Rd., Catonsville, MD (at Beltway Exit 13) on Tuesday and Wednesday from 3 to 5 and 7 to 9 P.M. where services will be held on Thursday at 11 A.M. Interment will be private.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
By SAM SESSA | February 7, 2008
Hometown -- Baltimore Current members --Damon Marrow, drums; Pat Jenkins, bass; Billy Redfield, guitar and vocals Founded in --2005 Style --acoustic pop rock Influenced by --Dave Matthews, Bruce Springsteen, Jimmy Buffett, Jack Johnson Notable --Since releasing his debut full-length album Two Steps Closer in 2006, Redfield has won a number of awards for his music and independently sold almost 15,000 copies of his music, including hard-copy and digital...
Advertisement
NEWS
By Shirley Leung and Shirley Leung,Sun Staff Writer | June 27, 1995
Married with children, and they're still rocking.They're Deja Vu, a six-member band that plays the hits of their youth.The average age is 44, and the average number of children is 1.6. The drummer has three grandchildren.On Saturday, the hometown band will headline Crofton's Fourth of July Celebration on Hardy Field."We had them last year, and we thought they were great," said Michelle Devine, president of the Bowie-Crofton Jaycees, which is organizing the event. "They wanted the publicity, and they were inexpensive."
NEWS
August 9, 2005
On August 7, 2005, JANE LAMAR-SPICKA, beloved wife of George F. Spicka, sister of John R. Brown Jr. Jane was a vocalist and bass player, wrote for Music Monthly Magazine, and performed in the Fabulous 50+ Players. Friends may call at the Mac Nabb Funeral Home, 301 Frederick Rd., Catonsville, MD (at Beltway Exit 13) on Tuesday and Wednesday from 3 to 5 and 7 to 9 P.M. where services will be held on Thursday at 11 A.M. Interment will be private.
ENTERTAINMENT
By SAM SESSA | February 7, 2008
Hometown -- Baltimore Current members --Damon Marrow, drums; Pat Jenkins, bass; Billy Redfield, guitar and vocals Founded in --2005 Style --acoustic pop rock Influenced by --Dave Matthews, Bruce Springsteen, Jimmy Buffett, Jack Johnson Notable --Since releasing his debut full-length album Two Steps Closer in 2006, Redfield has won a number of awards for his music and independently sold almost 15,000 copies of his music, including hard-copy and digital...
NEWS
By Amy L. Miller and Amy L. Miller,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 22, 2001
Get more than two bass guitar players together for a gig, and chances are the booking agent made a mistake. Unless the billing includes Western Maryland College's electric bass ensemble, which organizers say is one of two such groups in the country. "I had a good group of college students in the studio that year," said adjunct lecturer Bo Eckard of 1987, when he started offering the group as a course. "When you have musicians, it's natural to combine them. The more the merrier." The result has been a collection of six electric bass guitarists, including Eckard, who meet as a class once a week to practice and share ideas on how to improve their skills.
FEATURES
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,Pop Music Critic | March 7, 1993
"TC It isn't the sort of job you're likely to find listed in the want ads. For one thing, they don't want just anybody sending in a resume; only applicants of the highest caliber will be seriously considered. Besides, they've gotten enough free publicity since the job opened that there hasn't been any real need to advertise.But if there were an ad running somewhere, it would probably look like this:"BASS PLAYER WANTED for established English rock band with recording contract. Good pay, reasonable hours, high visibility.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Linell Smith and By Linell Smith,Sun Staff | February 9, 2003
Bass player Montell Poulson arrived a bit late -- he had just come in from another gig. Poulson used to play the Royal Theatre in Baltimore and the Howard Theatre in Washington. He roamed the East Coast with the Rivers Chambers Orchestra, playing for "heavy pockets" society events. He played with Eubie. He toured with Billie, Fats and Ethel. However, he began his set last Sunday by acknowledging another bass player seated near the front of the audience. "My mentor's Charlie Harris, who played with Nat King Cole," Poulson said, pointing him out. Then he waved to saxophone player Whit Williams: "I see you back there, too, 'Police Dog!
ENTERTAINMENT
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | May 30, 1996
It's really kind of hard to describe what, precisely, Chris Ballew does in the Presidents of the United States of America.Some of it is fairly obvious. He jumps around a lot. He does most of the singing. He plays one of the instruments.Ask which one, though, and things start to get tricky.At first glance, Ballew would seem to be the bass player, inasmuch as his instrument has fewer strings than that of bandmate Dave Dederer. But that really only works out as two strings vs. three (instead if the usual four vs. six)
FEATURES
By Jean Marbella and Jean Marbella,Sun Staff Writer | July 25, 1995
Two seminal moments in rock and roll history:The Beatles. On the Ed Sullivan Show. Feb. 9, 1964.Dogstar. At Bohager's Bar & Grill. July 24, 1995.Maybe you had to be there. It's not just the way the band sounds, which is basically loud and, well, loud. It's also the way it looks. Or, more specifically, the way its bass player looks.Just like Keanu Reeves.Which he is. Which is why some 600 people jammed into the cavernous Fells Point-area club to see a band that has yet to record its first album.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | September 14, 2003
Charles Pervis Harris, a Baltimore bass player who performed with the Lionel Hampton Orchestra during the 1940s and later with the Nat King Cole Trio, died of cancer Tuesday at Bon Secours Hospital. He was 87 and lived in Northwest Baltimore. Born in Alexandria, Va,, one of eight children, Mr. Harris moved in 1917 with his family to the city's Perkins Square neighborhood. He was 11 years old when he began studying violin and later played in his junior high school orchestra. He switched to bass while attending Douglass High School and started playing in local jazz clubs, where he earned $2 or $3 a night.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Linell Smith and By Linell Smith,Sun Staff | February 9, 2003
Bass player Montell Poulson arrived a bit late -- he had just come in from another gig. Poulson used to play the Royal Theatre in Baltimore and the Howard Theatre in Washington. He roamed the East Coast with the Rivers Chambers Orchestra, playing for "heavy pockets" society events. He played with Eubie. He toured with Billie, Fats and Ethel. However, he began his set last Sunday by acknowledging another bass player seated near the front of the audience. "My mentor's Charlie Harris, who played with Nat King Cole," Poulson said, pointing him out. Then he waved to saxophone player Whit Williams: "I see you back there, too, 'Police Dog!
NEWS
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | June 29, 2001
Actor Jack Lemmon, who died Wednesday at age 76 of complications related to cancer, turned from a comic wild card into a warm and crinkly Everyman, cushioning Walter Matthau's spikiness with his own testy sweetness in the "Grumpy Old Men" movies and dispensing life lessons as the dying academic in "Tuesdays With Morrie." Forty-one years ago, in "The Apartment," when Lemmon played a young company man who lent his modest pad to bosses who needed a love nest, his doctor neighbor kept urging him to be "a mensch."
NEWS
By Amy L. Miller and Amy L. Miller,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 22, 2001
Get more than two bass guitar players together for a gig, and chances are the booking agent made a mistake. Unless the billing includes Western Maryland College's electric bass ensemble, which organizers say is one of two such groups in the country. "I had a good group of college students in the studio that year," said adjunct lecturer Bo Eckard of 1987, when he started offering the group as a course. "When you have musicians, it's natural to combine them. The more the merrier." The result has been a collection of six electric bass guitarists, including Eckard, who meet as a class once a week to practice and share ideas on how to improve their skills.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | May 30, 1996
It's really kind of hard to describe what, precisely, Chris Ballew does in the Presidents of the United States of America.Some of it is fairly obvious. He jumps around a lot. He does most of the singing. He plays one of the instruments.Ask which one, though, and things start to get tricky.At first glance, Ballew would seem to be the bass player, inasmuch as his instrument has fewer strings than that of bandmate Dave Dederer. But that really only works out as two strings vs. three (instead if the usual four vs. six)
FEATURES
By Jean Marbella and Jean Marbella,Sun Staff Writer | July 25, 1995
Two seminal moments in rock and roll history:The Beatles. On the Ed Sullivan Show. Feb. 9, 1964.Dogstar. At Bohager's Bar & Grill. July 24, 1995.Maybe you had to be there. It's not just the way the band sounds, which is basically loud and, well, loud. It's also the way it looks. Or, more specifically, the way its bass player looks.Just like Keanu Reeves.Which he is. Which is why some 600 people jammed into the cavernous Fells Point-area club to see a band that has yet to record its first album.
NEWS
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | June 29, 2001
Actor Jack Lemmon, who died Wednesday at age 76 of complications related to cancer, turned from a comic wild card into a warm and crinkly Everyman, cushioning Walter Matthau's spikiness with his own testy sweetness in the "Grumpy Old Men" movies and dispensing life lessons as the dying academic in "Tuesdays With Morrie." Forty-one years ago, in "The Apartment," when Lemmon played a young company man who lent his modest pad to bosses who needed a love nest, his doctor neighbor kept urging him to be "a mensch."
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | September 14, 2003
Charles Pervis Harris, a Baltimore bass player who performed with the Lionel Hampton Orchestra during the 1940s and later with the Nat King Cole Trio, died of cancer Tuesday at Bon Secours Hospital. He was 87 and lived in Northwest Baltimore. Born in Alexandria, Va,, one of eight children, Mr. Harris moved in 1917 with his family to the city's Perkins Square neighborhood. He was 11 years old when he began studying violin and later played in his junior high school orchestra. He switched to bass while attending Douglass High School and started playing in local jazz clubs, where he earned $2 or $3 a night.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kendall Morgan and Kendall Morgan,Dallas Morning News | July 21, 1995
Dogstar is another name for Sirius, the brightest star in the sky. It's also, rather coincidentally, the name of a band that features actor Keanu Reeves, one of the brightest stars in Hollywood.But Dogstar differs from other actor-turned-musician projects such as Lou Diamond Phillips' Pipefitters and the late River Phoenix's Aleka's Attic in that Mr. Reeves is just a member of the group -- and not even the lead singer."Keanu just loves playing bass," says guitarist Gregg Miller, who shares vocal duties with guitarist Bret Domrose and drummer Rob Mailhouse.
NEWS
By Shirley Leung and Shirley Leung,Sun Staff Writer | June 27, 1995
Married with children, and they're still rocking.They're Deja Vu, a six-member band that plays the hits of their youth.The average age is 44, and the average number of children is 1.6. The drummer has three grandchildren.On Saturday, the hometown band will headline Crofton's Fourth of July Celebration on Hardy Field."We had them last year, and we thought they were great," said Michelle Devine, president of the Bowie-Crofton Jaycees, which is organizing the event. "They wanted the publicity, and they were inexpensive."
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.