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By Glenn Graham, The Baltimore Sun | February 9, 2011
Harford Tech sophomore Isaiah Gills is all about quality and quantity. A three-sport athlete who also plays four musical instruments, Gills has a 3.3 GPA and would like to study engineering when he goes to college. But Gills has plenty of time left at Harford Tech, and he’s putting it to good use. In football, he plays quarterback, wide receiver, cornerback and safety. For the track and field team, he runs the 400-meter relay and 800 relay, and competes in the high jump and triple jump events.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 30, 2014
Sometimes fate plays a hand that is so unmistakably evident that ignoring the sign seems completely ludicrous. For chief musician Rory Cherry, it was when he got his first bass guitar. The 37-year-old plays the electric bass for the U.S. Naval Academy band Electric Brigade, which will perform at the Inner Harbor Amphitheater for the Fourth of July Celebration at 7 p.m. Friday. He began playing music in the summer of 1989, and started learning to read music by playing trombone in middle school.
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NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,jacques.kelly@baltsun.com | December 11, 2008
Joseph Leo Flaherty III, a telecommunications worker who played bass guitar in local bands, died of esophageal cancer Friday at Gilchrist Hospice Center. The former Medfield resident was 56. Born in Baltimore and raised on Garrison Boulevard and on Mohawk Avenue in Forest Park, he began playing at age 12 on a guitar he received at Christmas. While attending Cardinal Gibbons High School, he added art to his interests. Family members said that in the late 1960s, school officials ordered him to cut his hair.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Brandon Weigel, Special to The Baltimore Sun | September 2, 2012
First was the heavy rain, forcing Maryland State Fair attendees awaiting the Band Perry to take cover in the grandstand of the racetrack and delaying the popular country band's set for more than an hour. Then, seven songs into the show Saturday night, flashes of lightning sent Kimberly Perry and her brothers Neil and Reid, along with their four-piece backing band, searching for cover. Following another delay of about 20 minutes, it was announced that the remainder of the show would be canceled, drawing a smattering of boos from the disappointed crowd.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | March 31, 2002
Robert M. Baum, who played bass guitar with O'Malley's March and was known for his rollicking renditions of traditional Irish music and an especially spirited "Brown Eyed Girl," died of a stroke Wednesday at his Columbia home. He was 51. Mr. Baum, who was born in Baltimore, and raised in Northwood and Lutherville, started playing bass guitar as an 11-year-old in garage bands. "I guess we've been playing together for 40 years," said electric guitarist and fellow band member Ralph J. Reinoldi, a boyhood friend who also grew up in Lutherville.
NEWS
By [MICHELLE DEAL-ZIMMERMAN] | June 24, 2007
When the sky gets cloudy and gray, WJZ-TV weather expert Marty Bass doesn't sing the blues. Instead, he plays them on his bass guitar. "It's a hobby. ... I've been playing since high school. I'm in a garage band at the Music Workshop," says Bass, who's probably best known as the co-host of WJZ's Morning Edition. "I like to play blues, like Bonnie Raitt." Originally from Louisville, Ky., Bass has been in Baltimore for almost 30 years. He's married and lives in Brooklandville with his wife, Sharon, and two kids: a daughter, Savannah, 16, and a son, Jake, 12. 1 Cord of firewood "Really good, aged, almost-ready-to-go firewood.
ENTERTAINMENT
By SAM SESSA | August 31, 2006
Hometown -- College Park Current members --Nick Hitchens, vocals; Jared Rosenbaum, keyboards; Tony Amoyal, guitar; Randy Coleman, bass guitar; Adam Soffrin, drums; Jason Budman, percussion; Mike Martin, baritone sax; Mario D'Ambrosio, tenor sax; Daniel Davis, trumpet; Erik Pearson, trumpet Founded in --2004 Style --funk and soul Influenced by --Earth, Wind and Fire, Blood, Sweat and Tears, Curtis Mayfield, Sly and the Family Stone Notable --Though he...
ENTERTAINMENT
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | May 3, 1991
POWER OF LOVELuther Vandross (Epic 46789)What makes Luther Vandross seem a cut above all the other satin-voiced soul men crowding the airwaves these days isn't his vocal range or technical ability -- it's his taste. Spend some time with "Power of Love," and what stands out about the album isn't Vandross' voice so much as his sense of melody and rhythm. That maybe why his performances seem deceptively effortless; because he knows how to shape his phrases to match the groove, his voice seems almost to float into those high notes.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 30, 2014
Sometimes fate plays a hand that is so unmistakably evident that ignoring the sign seems completely ludicrous. For chief musician Rory Cherry, it was when he got his first bass guitar. The 37-year-old plays the electric bass for the U.S. Naval Academy band Electric Brigade, which will perform at the Inner Harbor Amphitheater for the Fourth of July Celebration at 7 p.m. Friday. He began playing music in the summer of 1989, and started learning to read music by playing trombone in middle school.
FEATURES
By Ernest F. Imhoff and Ernest F. Imhoff,Evening Sun Staff | January 22, 1991
A BALTIMORE psychiatrist who composes electronic music on the side can sip coffee some mornings and hear his pieces played on National Public Radio's news program "Morning Edition."Andrew Brent Rudo, who practices medicine in Woodlawn, and NPR just signed a contract for the network's use of six minute-long pieces of jazz and big-band styles and another 20 shorter "musical bleebles, buttons and stingers." That's radio talk for filler, introductions and background. Hints of rock and country also sneak into Rudo's stuff.
SPORTS
By Glenn Graham, The Baltimore Sun | February 9, 2011
Harford Tech sophomore Isaiah Gills is all about quality and quantity. A three-sport athlete who also plays four musical instruments, Gills has a 3.3 GPA and would like to study engineering when he goes to college. But Gills has plenty of time left at Harford Tech, and he’s putting it to good use. In football, he plays quarterback, wide receiver, cornerback and safety. For the track and field team, he runs the 400-meter relay and 800 relay, and competes in the high jump and triple jump events.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,jacques.kelly@baltsun.com | December 11, 2008
Joseph Leo Flaherty III, a telecommunications worker who played bass guitar in local bands, died of esophageal cancer Friday at Gilchrist Hospice Center. The former Medfield resident was 56. Born in Baltimore and raised on Garrison Boulevard and on Mohawk Avenue in Forest Park, he began playing at age 12 on a guitar he received at Christmas. While attending Cardinal Gibbons High School, he added art to his interests. Family members said that in the late 1960s, school officials ordered him to cut his hair.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,Special to The Baltimore Sun | September 11, 2008
Rachel Franklin brings musical insight and passion to her jazz playing and her pre-concert lectures at the Annapolis Symphony Orchestra. The musicologist has prepared symphony audiences in pre-concert lectures since 1996. Franklin provides a deeper understanding of the music, and the lectures proved so popular that they outgrew Maryland Hall meeting rooms and moved to the main auditorium two seasons ago. Some lucky ASO concertgoers heard Franklin, a concert pianist, at the 2006 chamber music program she created in the first collaboration between the symphony and St. John's Mitchell Gallery, combining visual art with classical music selections.
NEWS
By [MICHELLE DEAL-ZIMMERMAN] | June 24, 2007
When the sky gets cloudy and gray, WJZ-TV weather expert Marty Bass doesn't sing the blues. Instead, he plays them on his bass guitar. "It's a hobby. ... I've been playing since high school. I'm in a garage band at the Music Workshop," says Bass, who's probably best known as the co-host of WJZ's Morning Edition. "I like to play blues, like Bonnie Raitt." Originally from Louisville, Ky., Bass has been in Baltimore for almost 30 years. He's married and lives in Brooklandville with his wife, Sharon, and two kids: a daughter, Savannah, 16, and a son, Jake, 12. 1 Cord of firewood "Really good, aged, almost-ready-to-go firewood.
ENTERTAINMENT
By SAM SESSA | August 31, 2006
Hometown -- College Park Current members --Nick Hitchens, vocals; Jared Rosenbaum, keyboards; Tony Amoyal, guitar; Randy Coleman, bass guitar; Adam Soffrin, drums; Jason Budman, percussion; Mike Martin, baritone sax; Mario D'Ambrosio, tenor sax; Daniel Davis, trumpet; Erik Pearson, trumpet Founded in --2004 Style --funk and soul Influenced by --Earth, Wind and Fire, Blood, Sweat and Tears, Curtis Mayfield, Sly and the Family Stone Notable --Though he...
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | March 31, 2002
Robert M. Baum, who played bass guitar with O'Malley's March and was known for his rollicking renditions of traditional Irish music and an especially spirited "Brown Eyed Girl," died of a stroke Wednesday at his Columbia home. He was 51. Mr. Baum, who was born in Baltimore, and raised in Northwood and Lutherville, started playing bass guitar as an 11-year-old in garage bands. "I guess we've been playing together for 40 years," said electric guitarist and fellow band member Ralph J. Reinoldi, a boyhood friend who also grew up in Lutherville.
BUSINESS
By Rick Ratliff and Rick Ratliff,Knight-Ridder News Service | April 22, 1991
DETROIT -- Something amazing happens when physicist Steve Shepard plays guitar in the den of his woodsy Southfield, Mich., home. What comes out are sounds of drums, keyboards, a bass guitar, a saxophone, whatever he wants -- up to 16 instruments at once.It happens because Mr. Shepard's guitar is connected to a Macintosh computer, equipped with MIDI devices, which enable a computer to generate music, and the computer is running a program called Sybil, which he co-developed.Unlike sequencers, programs that let a musician lay one track of computer-generated music atop another, Sybil lets a musician play multiple instrument sounds simultaneously by assigning specific notes to specific computerized instrument sounds or even to groups of instrument sounds.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,Special to The Baltimore Sun | September 11, 2008
Rachel Franklin brings musical insight and passion to her jazz playing and her pre-concert lectures at the Annapolis Symphony Orchestra. The musicologist has prepared symphony audiences in pre-concert lectures since 1996. Franklin provides a deeper understanding of the music, and the lectures proved so popular that they outgrew Maryland Hall meeting rooms and moved to the main auditorium two seasons ago. Some lucky ASO concertgoers heard Franklin, a concert pianist, at the 2006 chamber music program she created in the first collaboration between the symphony and St. John's Mitchell Gallery, combining visual art with classical music selections.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | May 3, 1991
POWER OF LOVELuther Vandross (Epic 46789)What makes Luther Vandross seem a cut above all the other satin-voiced soul men crowding the airwaves these days isn't his vocal range or technical ability -- it's his taste. Spend some time with "Power of Love," and what stands out about the album isn't Vandross' voice so much as his sense of melody and rhythm. That maybe why his performances seem deceptively effortless; because he knows how to shape his phrases to match the groove, his voice seems almost to float into those high notes.
BUSINESS
By Rick Ratliff and Rick Ratliff,Knight-Ridder News Service | April 22, 1991
DETROIT -- Something amazing happens when physicist Steve Shepard plays guitar in the den of his woodsy Southfield, Mich., home. What comes out are sounds of drums, keyboards, a bass guitar, a saxophone, whatever he wants -- up to 16 instruments at once.It happens because Mr. Shepard's guitar is connected to a Macintosh computer, equipped with MIDI devices, which enable a computer to generate music, and the computer is running a program called Sybil, which he co-developed.Unlike sequencers, programs that let a musician lay one track of computer-generated music atop another, Sybil lets a musician play multiple instrument sounds simultaneously by assigning specific notes to specific computerized instrument sounds or even to groups of instrument sounds.
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