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By Karol V. Menzie and Karol V. Menzie,Sun Staff Writer | April 20, 1994
When grains -- breads, cereals, rice and pasta -- moved from the back of the breakfast table to star billing as the foundation of the new food-guide pyramid a couple of years ago, some people were pretty startled.2 Whisk all ingredients in a bowl until blended.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By John Lindner, Special To The Baltimore Sun | February 12, 2012
With all the hot spices at work, the first couple forkfuls of Chicken Biryani ($7.99) are liable to leave your lips tingling. But the downtown Thousand Kabobs packs in flavor with the flame — strips of scarlet tomato and glossy onion relieved the monotone texture, and the rice also helped mellow the heat. So does the naan. You get way more than enough rice and spice for 8 bucks with this biryani and you can still pick up a freshly tandoori-ed naan round for $1.50 and stay under $10. Thousand Kabobs' tandoori bread is a lighter weight than some with a charred bottom and a soft, chewy topside.
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NEWS
By ROB KASPER | April 9, 2008
Saag paneer, a dish that blends chopped spinach, spices and cheese, is a fixture on the takeout menus of many Indian and Pakistani restaurants. The three dishes I retrieved from Baltimore-area restaurants were all bargains, delivering large servings of basmati rice, topped with vegetables and chunks of cheese. All served up enough food for two meals. Indigma Address --802 N. Charles St. Phone --410-605-1212 Hours --Lunch 11:30 a.m.-2:30 p.m. Tuesday-Friday, noon-3 p.m. Saturday-Sunday; dinner 5 p.m.-9:30 p.m. Tuesday-Thursday, 5 p.m.-10:30 p.m. Friday-Saturday, 5 p.m.-9:30 p.m. Sunday.
NEWS
By ROB KASPER | April 9, 2008
Saag paneer, a dish that blends chopped spinach, spices and cheese, is a fixture on the takeout menus of many Indian and Pakistani restaurants. The three dishes I retrieved from Baltimore-area restaurants were all bargains, delivering large servings of basmati rice, topped with vegetables and chunks of cheese. All served up enough food for two meals. Indigma Address --802 N. Charles St. Phone --410-605-1212 Hours --Lunch 11:30 a.m.-2:30 p.m. Tuesday-Friday, noon-3 p.m. Saturday-Sunday; dinner 5 p.m.-9:30 p.m. Tuesday-Thursday, 5 p.m.-10:30 p.m. Friday-Saturday, 5 p.m.-9:30 p.m. Sunday.
NEWS
September 20, 2006
"Rinsing isn't necessary with packaged brands of American-grown rice. But if your rice comes from a bulk tin, is imported from Asia or comes in a burlap-type bag, do rinse the rice before cooking. (It's best to rinse all basmati, too.)" From "Quick & Delicious," a recipe collection from Fine Cooking magazine arabicslice.com Ramadan is expected to begin this weekend. This "online cookbook" offers cooking tips and handy step-by-step instructions for recipes from throughout the Arab world for breaking the daily fast.
NEWS
By Jody K. Vilschick and Jody K. Vilschick,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 11, 2002
Some say that there are two kinds of Iranian cuisine: the kind you eat outside the home, and the kind you can eat only in private homes. The "public" Iranian food is what you usually find at Iranian restaurants in the West, and in Iran at the kababi or "kabob houses." Shish Kabob, which opened about four months ago in the Columbia Market Place shopping center on Snowden River Parkway, is styled on one of these kabob houses, specializing, of course, in kabobs. "We are very similar to those kabob places," said Vahid Taghvaei, one of the restaurant's owners.
NEWS
By Steve Petusevsky and Steve Petusevsky,South Florida Sun-Sentinel | January 23, 2008
I need to downsize. I'm not talking about just my car and my home but also my pantry. Don't misunderstand me; I still enjoy experimenting with new recipes and ingredients, but I have condiments, pastas and canned and packaged goods that hit their expiration dates before I use them. People give me stuff and I get samples that I give away because there is only so much I can cook. So now that it's the new year, I'm thinking about those ingredients that I must have. Here's a list of some of them: Dried red-pepper flakes: I carry individual packets of these with me at all times in case I need an emergency endorphin rush when traveling.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John Lindner, Special To The Baltimore Sun | February 12, 2012
With all the hot spices at work, the first couple forkfuls of Chicken Biryani ($7.99) are liable to leave your lips tingling. But the downtown Thousand Kabobs packs in flavor with the flame — strips of scarlet tomato and glossy onion relieved the monotone texture, and the rice also helped mellow the heat. So does the naan. You get way more than enough rice and spice for 8 bucks with this biryani and you can still pick up a freshly tandoori-ed naan round for $1.50 and stay under $10. Thousand Kabobs' tandoori bread is a lighter weight than some with a charred bottom and a soft, chewy topside.
NEWS
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Sun Restaurant Critic | March 4, 2001
Do you have a soft spot in your heart for funky little restaurants? Do you wish there were more places that serve intriguing food for under $15? And do you have a forgiving nature? Then Genevieve's, the full-service Fells Point restaurant that Margaret's Cafe Open has metamorphosed into, may be just the place for you. But if you're the kind of person who'll be bothered that the miniature bathroom sink is in the hallway, not the bathroom, then read no further. This is not the place for you. If you order your beef tenderloin medium rare and then expect it to arrive at the table medium rare, this may not be the place for you either.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch and Arthur Hirsch,SUN STAFF | March 19, 2003
As if to say that everything old is new again, here comes Marie Simmons writing about something ancient: rice. As dates are sketchy, suffice to say that rice was probably first cultivated in South Asia several thousand years ago, making it even older than the tomato aspic at the Woman's Industrial Exchange. So, what's new? Ingredient combinations, perhaps, as in Corn, Tomato and Rice Pudding With Chipotle Chile-Cheddar Custard or Fried Red Rice With Shiitakes and Bok Choy. In The Amazing World of Rice (William Morrow, 2003, $19.95)
NEWS
By Steve Petusevsky and Steve Petusevsky,South Florida Sun-Sentinel | January 23, 2008
I need to downsize. I'm not talking about just my car and my home but also my pantry. Don't misunderstand me; I still enjoy experimenting with new recipes and ingredients, but I have condiments, pastas and canned and packaged goods that hit their expiration dates before I use them. People give me stuff and I get samples that I give away because there is only so much I can cook. So now that it's the new year, I'm thinking about those ingredients that I must have. Here's a list of some of them: Dried red-pepper flakes: I carry individual packets of these with me at all times in case I need an emergency endorphin rush when traveling.
NEWS
September 20, 2006
"Rinsing isn't necessary with packaged brands of American-grown rice. But if your rice comes from a bulk tin, is imported from Asia or comes in a burlap-type bag, do rinse the rice before cooking. (It's best to rinse all basmati, too.)" From "Quick & Delicious," a recipe collection from Fine Cooking magazine arabicslice.com Ramadan is expected to begin this weekend. This "online cookbook" offers cooking tips and handy step-by-step instructions for recipes from throughout the Arab world for breaking the daily fast.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch and Arthur Hirsch,SUN STAFF | March 19, 2003
As if to say that everything old is new again, here comes Marie Simmons writing about something ancient: rice. As dates are sketchy, suffice to say that rice was probably first cultivated in South Asia several thousand years ago, making it even older than the tomato aspic at the Woman's Industrial Exchange. So, what's new? Ingredient combinations, perhaps, as in Corn, Tomato and Rice Pudding With Chipotle Chile-Cheddar Custard or Fried Red Rice With Shiitakes and Bok Choy. In The Amazing World of Rice (William Morrow, 2003, $19.95)
NEWS
By Jody K. Vilschick and Jody K. Vilschick,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 11, 2002
Some say that there are two kinds of Iranian cuisine: the kind you eat outside the home, and the kind you can eat only in private homes. The "public" Iranian food is what you usually find at Iranian restaurants in the West, and in Iran at the kababi or "kabob houses." Shish Kabob, which opened about four months ago in the Columbia Market Place shopping center on Snowden River Parkway, is styled on one of these kabob houses, specializing, of course, in kabobs. "We are very similar to those kabob places," said Vahid Taghvaei, one of the restaurant's owners.
NEWS
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Sun Restaurant Critic | March 4, 2001
Do you have a soft spot in your heart for funky little restaurants? Do you wish there were more places that serve intriguing food for under $15? And do you have a forgiving nature? Then Genevieve's, the full-service Fells Point restaurant that Margaret's Cafe Open has metamorphosed into, may be just the place for you. But if you're the kind of person who'll be bothered that the miniature bathroom sink is in the hallway, not the bathroom, then read no further. This is not the place for you. If you order your beef tenderloin medium rare and then expect it to arrive at the table medium rare, this may not be the place for you either.
FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie and Karol V. Menzie,Sun Staff Writer | April 20, 1994
When grains -- breads, cereals, rice and pasta -- moved from the back of the breakfast table to star billing as the foundation of the new food-guide pyramid a couple of years ago, some people were pretty startled.2 Whisk all ingredients in a bowl until blended.
FEATURES
By Rita Calvert and Rita Calvert,Contributing Writer | October 27, 1993
Q: I have a problem freezing my freshly-baked fruit pies. How can I prevent them from getting watery when they thaw?A: Judith Choate, author of "The Great American Pie Book," recommends freezing fruit pies only if unbaked. If preparing a pie that calls for a pre-baked filling, such as a berry filling, let that cool before placing the unbaked pie in a plastic bag and sealing. Otherwise, for such pies as apple or pear pie, prepare entire pie up to baking point. Some frozen unbaked pies can actually be baked while still frozen.
FEATURES
By KATE SHATZKIN | July 1, 2006
What it is -- A one-serving package of rice that can be microwaved or stir-fried. What we like about it --For a packaged convenience item, this rice is surprisingly rich in aroma and flavor; we detected plenty of evidence of its signature spices. It made a fine partner for tandoori chicken and couldn't have been easier to prepare. Other flavors in the line include basmati, coconut and yellow rice. What it costs --$5.99 for two 8.82-ounce pouches Where to buy it --worldfood.com Per serving (1 package)
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