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By Hanah Cho, The Baltimore Sun | August 19, 2010
Nike made its mark with Michael Jordan sneakers in the 1980s, eventually wresting near-total control of the U.S. basketball shoe market from Adidas, Reebok and other smaller players. Now, Baltimore sports apparel company Under Armour Inc. is trying to gain a foothold in the fiercely competitive business with its first-ever basketball shoe collection, which was unveiled Thursday and will hit stores in limited numbers in November. The step is a crucial one for Under Armour, whose footwear business has been struggling even as executives consider it a key part of the corporate growth strategy.
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SPORTS
By Glenn Graham and The Baltimore Sun | March 4, 2013
John Carroll junior forward Lionel Owona has started a project to collect used basketball shoes that will be sent to Cameroon to benefit underprivileged young basketball players.   Owona is asking anybody who has used basketball shoes that can still be worn to please donate them to help grow the sport in the African country.  Any donations can be left with John Carroll coach Tony Martin at the school in Bel Air .  The shoes will...
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SPORTS
By Glenn Graham and The Baltimore Sun | March 4, 2013
John Carroll junior forward Lionel Owona has started a project to collect used basketball shoes that will be sent to Cameroon to benefit underprivileged young basketball players.   Owona is asking anybody who has used basketball shoes that can still be worn to please donate them to help grow the sport in the African country.  Any donations can be left with John Carroll coach Tony Martin at the school in Bel Air .  The shoes will...
BUSINESS
By Hanah Cho, The Baltimore Sun | August 19, 2010
Nike made its mark with Michael Jordan sneakers in the 1980s, eventually wresting near-total control of the U.S. basketball shoe market from Adidas, Reebok and other smaller players. Now, Baltimore sports apparel company Under Armour Inc. is trying to gain a foothold in the fiercely competitive business with its first-ever basketball shoe collection, which was unveiled Thursday and will hit stores in limited numbers in November. The step is a crucial one for Under Armour, whose footwear business has been struggling even as executives consider it a key part of the corporate growth strategy.
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | February 19, 1994
I am a straight-laced, low-tech kind of guy. When the brave new world of technology presents me with new and varied options, I pretend they are not there.The kids and their college-age sitter have programmed our kitchen telephone. They phone friends by hitting two buttons. I call by staring at the printed number in the telephone book, while slowly punching the seven digits on the telephone dial.When I accidentally hit the "menu" button on the television's remote control device, I take a deep breath and try to remain calm.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | September 10, 1997
BEAVERTON, Ore. -- Nike Inc. and basketball star Michael Jordan yesterday announced a new line of basketball shoes and sportswear to be made and sold by Nike under the "Jordan" brand name.The first Jordan products are expected to be on store shelves Nov. 1, in time for the holiday selling season.The line, which will include the current Air Jordan brand, is expected to generate more than $300 million in revenue in fiscal 1998, analysts said.The move allows Nike, the world's largest maker of athletic shoes and sportswear, to gain even more of the basketball-shoe market through another brand, analysts said.
NEWS
By Darren M. Allen and Darren M. Allen,Sun Staff Writer | May 22, 1994
A 17-year-old boy playing with two friends in his Northeast Baltimore neighborhood was shot fatally early yesterday after he bumped into a parked car and set off its alarm, police reported.Vernon Alexander "Beethoven" Williams of the 4000 block of Sinclair Lane was standing next to a red 1987 Toyota Forerunner when as many as six shots were fired from a window in the 4300 block of Clareway St. At least one shot hit him in the back, and he died instantly, police said.Police charged the car's owner, William Norman Jr., 29, of the 1800 block of E. Belvedere Ave. with first-degree murder and two counts of attempted murder.
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | November 4, 1995
I WENT TO a sporting goods store with a couple of teen-age boys, one of them mine. The teens regarded this trip as a chance to buy "cool" sweat shirts and other guy stuff. For me this trip wasn't about male bonding, it was about bandaging.I was there to check out the knee braces, ankle braces, to look at any device that could help keep my joints aligned. While I was at it, I planned to scout around for some basketball shoes. I didn't care if the shoes were stylish. I just didn't want the shoes to pinch my feet when I put in my custom-made foot braces.
FEATURES
October 21, 1998
Did you have a favorite article of clothing or stuffed animal as a kid?Julie Foudy, midfielder, U.S. soccer team: "I used to have a pair of hot-pink Vans [skateboard sneakers] when I was in junior high. I loved them because they were kind of crazy."Jonny Moseley, Olympic gold medalist, freestyle skiing: "My grandmother gave me a Snoopy doll when I was 3 years old. Snoopy was dressed like a skier. I still have Snoopy on my bed at home."Shareef Abdur-Rahim, forward, Vancouver Grizzlies: "My first pair of basketball shoes.
BUSINESS
By Timothy J. Mullaney and Timothy J. Mullaney,Sun Staff Writer | August 18, 1995
Fila USA said yesterday it has a tentative, five-year deal with former University of North Carolina basketball star Jerry Stackhouse to endorse sneakers and athletic clothing, winning out over industry rivals Nike Inc., Reebok International Ltd. and .. Converse Inc."We got him [Wednesday] night," said Howe Burch, vice president for advertising at Hunt Valley-based Fila USA, which accounts for more than 60 percent of its Italian parent company's sales. "What we have right now is a letter of agreement, pending completion of a formal contract."
SPORTS
By David Steele | September 28, 2006
Stephon Marbury calls the tour that comes to Eastpoint Mall this afternoon the Starbury Movement Tour, because he wants the basketball shoes and clothing he is promoting to clear a path to a new way of marketing and selling such popular gear to lower-income buyers. "To really be honest, this is a people story more than a basketball story," Marbury, the New York Knicks guard, said by phone yesterday. "For us, we don't see it in that [basketball] sense; we see it as being a movement for the people ... a movement for the people who want to have shoes and gear they can afford.
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | July 1, 2006
Thanks to my pair of "Chucks," Chuck Taylor Converse All Star sneakers, I might have joined the ranks of the faintly fashionable. Long regarded as the simplest of sneakers, Chucks have gone glitzy. The other day, I read an article in The Wall Street Journal saying that some styles of Chucks are being sold for top dollar at fancy stores such as Barneys New York. The term "fashionista," one I am rarely in vicinity of, was actually applied to my brand of sneakers. I confess that I felt smug about the fact that I didn't go out in search of the au courant, rather it came to me. I bought my Chucks a year or so ago at the Sports Authority in Towson.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Story by Kevin Van Valkenburg and Story by Kevin Van Valkenburg,SUN STAFF | May 30, 2004
LONG BEFORE Rayna Du-Bose became a basketball star -- and half a lifetime before the day she got sick, went to the hospital and almost never came home -- she was a dancer. Ballet, to be specific. The soft, poetic music and her long arms and legs formed a natural partnership. Dance was her first love, and as is often the case with first loves, she never forgot what it felt like, to twirl and spin and smirk at the limitations of gravity. The DuBose family was not rich, but there was money for tutus and ballet slippers, even if Rayna would outgrow them in mere months.
FEATURES
October 21, 1998
Did you have a favorite article of clothing or stuffed animal as a kid?Julie Foudy, midfielder, U.S. soccer team: "I used to have a pair of hot-pink Vans [skateboard sneakers] when I was in junior high. I loved them because they were kind of crazy."Jonny Moseley, Olympic gold medalist, freestyle skiing: "My grandmother gave me a Snoopy doll when I was 3 years old. Snoopy was dressed like a skier. I still have Snoopy on my bed at home."Shareef Abdur-Rahim, forward, Vancouver Grizzlies: "My first pair of basketball shoes.
NEWS
By Todd Richissin and Todd Richissin,SUN STAFF | February 22, 1998
Rachel Bartock is only 5 years old, and if she's not laughing today as much as she did yesterday, she can blame both Grandpa and the youth of Japan.Her grandfather, James Brown of Baltimore, sold his big, rather goofy-looking blue and black basketball sneakers, which -- to Rachel's giggles -- had once doubled as uproariously funny clown shoes.Guess a kid has to find out sometime what a grandfather will do for a quick $150.Brown surrendered the shoes, a pair of 1985 Nike Air Jordans, to a company that will sell them to kids in Japan who are trying, in desperately expensive ways, to be cool.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | September 10, 1997
BEAVERTON, Ore. -- Nike Inc. and basketball star Michael Jordan yesterday announced a new line of basketball shoes and sportswear to be made and sold by Nike under the "Jordan" brand name.The first Jordan products are expected to be on store shelves Nov. 1, in time for the holiday selling season.The line, which will include the current Air Jordan brand, is expected to generate more than $300 million in revenue in fiscal 1998, analysts said.The move allows Nike, the world's largest maker of athletic shoes and sportswear, to gain even more of the basketball-shoe market through another brand, analysts said.
NEWS
By Wiley A. Hall 3rd | March 19, 1991
My buddy Bullwinkle and I were strolling past a high school when the teen-agers there burst into laughter.At first, I thought they were laughing at me, which would have been an outrage.But then I looked down at Bullwinkle's feet."Good lord, Bullwinkle!" I exclaimed. "What happened to your basketball shoes!""Wha'?" said Bullwinkle, quick on the uptake as always. "What's wrong with my shoes?"I'll tell you what was wrong with Bullwinkle's shoes. They had burst at the seams and were held together with electric tape.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | August 1, 1997
BIELLA, Italy -- Fila Holding SpA's second-quarter earnings fell 42 percent, largely because of poor U.S. demand for its basketball shoes, the company said yesterday.Net income fell to $15 million, or 56 cents per American depositary receipt, from $25.9 million, or 98 cents, a year earlier. The average estimate was for 53 cents per ADR, based on six analysts surveyed by IBES International Inc.Revenue rose 8.85 percent to $350.5 million from $322 million.Fila, which has its U.S headquarters in Sparks, warned last month that earnings would drop because of slowing sales and order cancellations in the U.S. The Fila brand has lost its appeal in the U.S. basketball market, a key product category for the company.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | August 1, 1997
BIELLA, Italy -- Fila Holding SpA's second-quarter earnings fell 42 percent, largely because of poor U.S. demand for its basketball shoes, the company said yesterday.Net income fell to $15 million, or 56 cents per American depositary receipt, from $25.9 million, or 98 cents, a year earlier. The average estimate was for 53 cents per ADR, based on six analysts surveyed by IBES International Inc.Revenue rose 8.85 percent to $350.5 million from $322 million.Fila, which has its U.S headquarters in Sparks, warned last month that earnings would drop because of slowing sales and order cancellations in the U.S. The Fila brand has lost its appeal in the U.S. basketball market, a key product category for the company.
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