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By Ian Johnson and Ian Johnson,Special for The Sun | January 16, 1991
BERLIN -- Despite Germany's re-emergence as a major power, people here do not want their country to get involved in world events, especially not the Persian Gulf conflict.Recent opinion polls, as well as interviews with experts and ordinary people, show that Germans are suspicious of involvement in world trouble spots, such as the Middle East.Although the polls indicate support for continuing the country's alliance with the United States, this doesn't mean Germans want to support U.S. causes too strongly.
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NEWS
By TRUDY RUBIN | October 4, 2005
PHILADELPHIA -- While the United States is promoting democracy as the best global political model, China is holding up a competitive theory to the world. A September trip to Beijing, Shanghai, Xian and Hong Kong gave me a chance to examine the Chinese model. Here is its essence: If you develop a state-directed version of capitalism and keep the economy booming, the population won't care about democratic freedoms. People will choose stability and growth over messy democracy that could lead to chaos.
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NEWS
By New York Times News Service | December 1, 1992
BEIJING -- China significantly raised the stakes yesterday in its dispute with Britain over Hong Kong by declaring that all contracts signed by the territorial government and not approved by Beijing will become invalid when London ends its rule there in 1997.The Hong Kong government responded immediately that the declaration violated the Chinese-British Joint Declaration of 1984 and the Basic Law, the documents that govern the transition period and guarantee the territory's economic and political freedoms for 50 years.
TOPIC
By Ronald Brownstein and Ronald Brownstein,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 7, 2002
THE DEBATE about President Bush's latest posture on the Middle East boils down to a dispute over his sincerity. At home and abroad, his supporters argue that his call for fundamental political and social reform offers Palestinians a defined path not only to statehood but more prosperous, stable and orderly lives. His critics believe Bush has established a set of conditions that he knows the Palestinians cannot meet as a pretext to indefinitely freeze negotiations toward independence. From that angle, the real goal isn't reform, but delay.
NEWS
By Robert Benjamin and Robert Benjamin,Beijing Bureau | October 23, 1992
BEIJING -- Hong Kong Gov. Chris Patten leaves here today the same as he arrived three days ago: at loggerheads with Chinese officials over his proposals for expanding democracy in the British colony prior to its 1997 takeover by China.After almost 12 hours of meetings with Chinese officials, Mr. Patten last night reported no progress in selling them on his plans to increase the number of elected members of Hong Kong's legislature in the colony's 1995 elections, its last before Chinese rule.
NEWS
By Robert Benjamin and Robert Benjamin,Beijing Bureau | October 23, 1992
BEIJING -- Hong Kong Governor Chris Patten leaves here today the same as he arrived three days ago: at loggerheads with Chinese officials over his proposals for expanding democracy in the British colony prior to its 1997 takeover by China.After almost 12 hours of meetings with Chinese officials, Mr. Patten last night reported no progress in selling them on his plans to increase the number of elected members of Hong Kong's legislature in the colony's 1995 elections, its last before Chinese rule.
NEWS
By Robert Benjamin and Robert Benjamin,Beijing Bureau | March 18, 1993
BEIJING -- China vowed yesterday to begin preparations soon for dissolving the Hong Kong legislature in 1997 if the colony's British governor proceeds with his proposed political reforms.Lu Ping, China's top official for Hong Kong affairs, said China will replace the legislature with a new one if Hong Kong's 1995 elections are held under Gov. Chris Patten's proposals to expand the colony's voting franchise and the number of elected legislators.Under previous Chinese-British plans for a smooth transition of power, the colonial legislature elected in 1995 is supposed to hold office until 1999, two years after the colony reverts to Chinese rule.
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | February 16, 1999
BEIJING -- When Hong Kong returned to China 19 months ago in a blaze of fireworks and tearful farewells, many feared that the mainland would trample free speech and human rights in the free-wheeling former British colony.Instead, the territory and its motherland now find themselves on the brink of a constitutional crisis over a matter even dearer to the hearts of Hong Kong's business-minded people: the rule of law.The conflict, the biggest since the July 1997 handover, revolves around a ruling last month by Hong Kong's Court of Final Appeal that would allow tens of thousands of mainland children with Hong Kong parents to live in the territory.
NEWS
By Ian Johnson and Ian Johnson,Special to The Sun | March 10, 1991
BERLIN -- With the Persian Gulf war over, German leaders are preparing changes that would allow wider participation in military actions.Government and opposition parties are slowly coming to an agreement that the country's basic law should be changed to allow German troops to be sent overseas. In anticipation of this, the armed forces have started to develop division-level mobile units that can be deployed on short notice, according to confidential military documents that became available last week.
NEWS
By TRUDY RUBIN | October 4, 2005
PHILADELPHIA -- While the United States is promoting democracy as the best global political model, China is holding up a competitive theory to the world. A September trip to Beijing, Shanghai, Xian and Hong Kong gave me a chance to examine the Chinese model. Here is its essence: If you develop a state-directed version of capitalism and keep the economy booming, the population won't care about democratic freedoms. People will choose stability and growth over messy democracy that could lead to chaos.
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | February 16, 1999
BEIJING -- When Hong Kong returned to China 19 months ago in a blaze of fireworks and tearful farewells, many feared that the mainland would trample free speech and human rights in the free-wheeling former British colony.Instead, the territory and its motherland now find themselves on the brink of a constitutional crisis over a matter even dearer to the hearts of Hong Kong's business-minded people: the rule of law.The conflict, the biggest since the July 1997 handover, revolves around a ruling last month by Hong Kong's Court of Final Appeal that would allow tens of thousands of mainland children with Hong Kong parents to live in the territory.
NEWS
By Robert Benjamin and Robert Benjamin,Beijing Bureau | March 18, 1993
BEIJING -- China vowed yesterday to begin preparations soon for dissolving the Hong Kong legislature in 1997 if the colony's British governor proceeds with his proposed political reforms.Lu Ping, China's top official for Hong Kong affairs, said China will replace the legislature with a new one if Hong Kong's 1995 elections are held under Gov. Chris Patten's proposals to expand the colony's voting franchise and the number of elected legislators.Under previous Chinese-British plans for a smooth transition of power, the colonial legislature elected in 1995 is supposed to hold office until 1999, two years after the colony reverts to Chinese rule.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | December 1, 1992
BEIJING -- China significantly raised the stakes yesterday in its dispute with Britain over Hong Kong by declaring that all contracts signed by the territorial government and not approved by Beijing will become invalid when London ends its rule there in 1997.The Hong Kong government responded immediately that the declaration violated the Chinese-British Joint Declaration of 1984 and the Basic Law, the documents that govern the transition period and guarantee the territory's economic and political freedoms for 50 years.
NEWS
By Robert Benjamin and Robert Benjamin,Beijing Bureau | October 23, 1992
BEIJING -- Hong Kong Gov. Chris Patten leaves here today the same as he arrived three days ago: at loggerheads with Chinese officials over his proposals for expanding democracy in the British colony prior to its 1997 takeover by China.After almost 12 hours of meetings with Chinese officials, Mr. Patten last night reported no progress in selling them on his plans to increase the number of elected members of Hong Kong's legislature in the colony's 1995 elections, its last before Chinese rule.
NEWS
By Robert Benjamin and Robert Benjamin,Beijing Bureau | October 23, 1992
BEIJING -- Hong Kong Governor Chris Patten leaves here today the same as he arrived three days ago: at loggerheads with Chinese officials over his proposals for expanding democracy in the British colony prior to its 1997 takeover by China.After almost 12 hours of meetings with Chinese officials, Mr. Patten last night reported no progress in selling them on his plans to increase the number of elected members of Hong Kong's legislature in the colony's 1995 elections, its last before Chinese rule.
NEWS
By Ian Johnson and Ian Johnson,Special to The Sun | March 10, 1991
BERLIN -- With the Persian Gulf war over, German leaders are preparing changes that would allow wider participation in military actions.Government and opposition parties are slowly coming to an agreement that the country's basic law should be changed to allow German troops to be sent overseas. In anticipation of this, the armed forces have started to develop division-level mobile units that can be deployed on short notice, according to confidential military documents that became available last week.
TOPIC
By Ronald Brownstein and Ronald Brownstein,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 7, 2002
THE DEBATE about President Bush's latest posture on the Middle East boils down to a dispute over his sincerity. At home and abroad, his supporters argue that his call for fundamental political and social reform offers Palestinians a defined path not only to statehood but more prosperous, stable and orderly lives. His critics believe Bush has established a set of conditions that he knows the Palestinians cannot meet as a pretext to indefinitely freeze negotiations toward independence. From that angle, the real goal isn't reform, but delay.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | October 29, 1992
HONG KONG -- Britain and China yesterday made public the texts of secret diplomatic exchanges on the subject of Hong Kong elections, each side trying to prove it was in the right in a bitter dispute over political changes in this British colony before it reverts to China in 1997.Beijing asserted that the documents showed that a confidential deal had been reached on key elements in the next legislative election in Hong Kong in 1995.But Hong Kong's governor, Christopher Patten, who has proposed a series of changes to broaden the voter base of the 1995 elections, said the 50-page exchange proved just the opposite -- that no deal had been made.
NEWS
By Ian Johnson and Ian Johnson,Special for The Sun | January 16, 1991
BERLIN -- Despite Germany's re-emergence as a major power, people here do not want their country to get involved in world events, especially not the Persian Gulf conflict.Recent opinion polls, as well as interviews with experts and ordinary people, show that Germans are suspicious of involvement in world trouble spots, such as the Middle East.Although the polls indicate support for continuing the country's alliance with the United States, this doesn't mean Germans want to support U.S. causes too strongly.
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