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SPORTS
May 26, 1991
Pete Rose has asked baseball writers not to use the Hall of Fame induction ceremonies in July as a vehicle for protesting changes in the balloting procedure.In a letter to Jack Lang, secretary of the Baseball Writers Association of America, Rose also askee the writers not bo boycott the voting.The Hall of Fame's board of directors voted in kFebruary, over the objection of Lang and many of his colleagues, to remove from the ballot any player banned for life from baseball.Rose was barred in 1989 for betting on baseball games and subsequently served prison time for failing to pay taxes on money made from gambling and selling memorabilia.
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SPORTS
By Dan Connolly and The Baltimore Sun | January 8, 2014
The national buzz surrounding Wednesday's 2 p.m. Hall of Fame announcement centers on whether the Baseball Writers' Association of America will elect someone - or several players - this year after swinging and missing in 2013. The best sense is yes, considering the influx of impressive first-year candidates, such as pitchers Greg Maddux and Tom Glavine and slugger Frank Thomas, as well as solid holdovers Craig Biggio, Mike Piazza and Jack Morris, among others. For Orioles fans, though, the intrigue surrounds two players who almost assuredly won't be named on the required 75 percent of submitted ballots: starting pitcher Mike Mussina and first baseman Rafael Palmeiro.
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SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck,Staff Writer | October 28, 1992
Oakland Athletics manager Tony La Russa was named American League Manager of the Year by the Baseball Writers' Association of America yesterday, finishing well ahead of Milwaukee Brewers manager Phil Garner and Orioles manager Johnny Oates.La Russa, who guided a bruised and battered A's team to the American League West title, received 25 first-place votes and 132 points. Garner, whose Brewers club made a late run at the AL East title, got two first-place votes and 76 points to finish second.
SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina and The Baltimore Sun | November 15, 2013
It looks as though 53 homers and 138 RBIs doesn't go as far as it used to these days . Orioles first baseman Chris Davis' remarkable season earned him recognition in every major offseason postseason award, but Davis netted just one trophy - a Silver Slugger award - for his effort. And in the race for the American League Most Valuable Player Award, Davis finished third behind back-to-back winner Miguel Cabrera of the Tigers and Angels outfielder Mike Trout. The MVP is one of eight annual postseason award selected by the members of the Baseball Writers' Association of America.
SPORTS
June 17, 2006
Summer of discontent for 9th year in a row Summer is upon us, a third of the baseball season has whizzed by, and the Orioles' dwindling faithful are desperately searching for ways to avert our attention from the team's record. We as fans have been through this drill so long now, we seem steeled by the team's performance. We keep hearing this will be "year nine" for consecutive losing seasons. It makes .500 baseball sound like horsehide nirvana. It shouldn't be like this. Mr. Angelos seems to accept this team's mediocrity as some form of overachievement.
SPORTS
By LAURA VECSEY | January 8, 2003
WE KNOW EDDIE Murray could be a grouch -- to the media, not to his teammates or coaches, who seem to universally revere Murray's professionalism. But how do we describe the 73 baseball writers who failed to vote for Murray as a first-ballot Hall of Famer? Maybe Murray was right about sportswriters. We can't be trusted. That is certainly one way to read the voting results of the 2003 Hall of Fame inductees, announced by the Baseball Writers' Association of America yesterday. Only the switch-hitting first baseman Murray and catcher Gary Carter passed through baseball writers' purgatory into the immortal realm, but there is something slightly foul about this winter's balloting.
NEWS
December 12, 2006
Baseball writers received their Hall of Fame ballots recently, and some of them have sworn to do the job usually performed by custodians: They have promised to keep the hall clean. The housecleaning has become an issue because, along with worthy candidates such as Tony Gwynn and Cal Ripken Jr., the sportswriters must consider Mark McGwire. In 1998, Mr. McGwire hit a then-record 70 home runs, a feat that since has been tarnished by allegations that he used steroids. He had a chance last spring to refute those charges before a House committee investigating steroid use in Major League Baseball; he refused, saying, "I'm not here to discuss the past."
SPORTS
June 26, 2012
Many character issues Juan C. Rodriguez Sun Sentinel It won't happen soon. Clemens' acquittal probably sways some voters on the fence about his candidacy. It won't put a big enough dent into the broader cross-section of writers who aren't prepared to induct anyone with strong links, circumstantial or otherwise, to the steroid era. The government did not fail to prove Clemens took steroids or human growth hormone. It failed to prove he perjured himself in front of Congress.
SPORTS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 20, 1998
NEW YORK -- Sammy Sosa finally found a way to get ahead of Mark McGwire and stay ahead.After losing out to McGwire in the historic race for the home run record this past season, Sosa yesterday beat his friendly adversary in the race for National League Most Valuable Player.The result brought a conclusion to the scintillating competition between the two sluggers that raged throughout the summer and captivated the American public. In their race to break Roger Maris' record of 61 homers, Sosa held only two short-lived leads.
SPORTS
By Dan Shaughnessy and Dan Shaughnessy,Boston Globe | February 5, 1991
We're supposed to feel insulted, those of us who vote in the annual election for baseball's Hall of Fame. It's clear that the Lords of Baseball don't trust us to do the right thing when it comes to Pete Rose.Bowie Kuhn, Jim Campbell and another 10 barely breathing members of the Hall's board of directors yesterday unanimously voted to keep all the permanently ineligible players (Rose is the only living member of this Bad Boy Club) off the Hall of Fame ballot.Baseball writers across the land are up in arms.
SPORTS
June 26, 2012
Many character issues Juan C. Rodriguez Sun Sentinel It won't happen soon. Clemens' acquittal probably sways some voters on the fence about his candidacy. It won't put a big enough dent into the broader cross-section of writers who aren't prepared to induct anyone with strong links, circumstantial or otherwise, to the steroid era. The government did not fail to prove Clemens took steroids or human growth hormone. It failed to prove he perjured himself in front of Congress.
NEWS
January 10, 2007
Every baseball fan knew this day would come, and yet yesterday's announcement that Cal Ripken Jr. has been chosen for induction into the National Baseball Hall of Fame packed an emotional wallop, particularly for this city. The two-time Most Valuable Player deserved the overwhelming first-ballot acceptance he received; his streak of 2,632 consecutive games played will likely never be broken, and his solid career numbers, 431 homers and 3,184 hits, could justify his entry alone, especially when compared with other shortstops.
NEWS
December 12, 2006
Baseball writers received their Hall of Fame ballots recently, and some of them have sworn to do the job usually performed by custodians: They have promised to keep the hall clean. The housecleaning has become an issue because, along with worthy candidates such as Tony Gwynn and Cal Ripken Jr., the sportswriters must consider Mark McGwire. In 1998, Mr. McGwire hit a then-record 70 home runs, a feat that since has been tarnished by allegations that he used steroids. He had a chance last spring to refute those charges before a House committee investigating steroid use in Major League Baseball; he refused, saying, "I'm not here to discuss the past."
SPORTS
By DAN CONNOLLY and DAN CONNOLLY,SUN REPORTER | July 16, 2006
Hours at a time, baseball writers stand in clubhouses with notebooks and tape recorders waiting for players to offer pearls of wisdom. Most times, we get nothing. Cliches. Brief answers. Nasty stares if the questions are particularly stupid or the one being interviewed is particularly surly. Occasionally, though, ballplayers and managers fill it up with introspective stuff, funny stuff, bizarre stuff. The reigning king, of course, is Chicago White Sox manager Ozzie Guillen, who already has a book of quotes published.
SPORTS
June 17, 2006
Summer of discontent for 9th year in a row Summer is upon us, a third of the baseball season has whizzed by, and the Orioles' dwindling faithful are desperately searching for ways to avert our attention from the team's record. We as fans have been through this drill so long now, we seem steeled by the team's performance. We keep hearing this will be "year nine" for consecutive losing seasons. It makes .500 baseball sound like horsehide nirvana. It shouldn't be like this. Mr. Angelos seems to accept this team's mediocrity as some form of overachievement.
SPORTS
By CHILDS WALKER | February 14, 2006
Fantasy baseball players, I give you a simple task: Ignore most of what you see and hear from baseball writers over the next six weeks. OK, so I'm overstating to get at a more general point. Come November, passionate baseball fans begin counting the days to that glorious February morning when pitchers and catchers report. By the time we reach that day, which arrives later this week, we're incredibly thirsty for new baseball content. Baseball writers are equally eager to shovel new material our way. So every little happening in spring training is magnified.
SPORTS
By KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | August 3, 1997
PHILADELPHIA -- By the end of this weekend, there could be a new name for the rustic, heretofore peaceful village of Cooperstown, N.Y.: Lasordatown.This afternoon, Norristown, Pa.'s winningest citizen, Mr. Thomas C. Lasorda, will be inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame. At last count, 38 buses full of people were expected to rampage north to be present for this historic occasion."From all indications," said Hall of Fame public relations director Jeff Idelson, "Norristown may be a very barren area Sunday."
SPORTS
By CHILDS WALKER | January 10, 2006
Free Bert Blyleven! Don't worry, the 6-foot-3 native of Holland hasn't been seized by leftist guerrillas or anything. By most standards, Blyleven, who pitched 22 seasons for the Minnesota Twins, Texas Rangers, Pittsburgh Pirates, Cleveland Indians and California Angels and now broadcasts for the Twins, has led a charmed life. But make no mistake, Blyleven resides in a kind of purgatory, that limbo of indisputably excellent ballplayers who, for whatever reason, never left strong impressions on the seamhead masses.
SPORTS
By Jeff Zrebiec and Kim Phelan and Jeff Zrebiec and Kim Phelan,SUN STAFF | August 7, 2005
The debate was supposed to have ended on that night last month in Seattle when Rafael Palmeiro stroked his 3,000th hit, a well-placed double that bounced in front of the left field fence at Safeco Field, a spot in baseball immortality landing with it. As one of four players with 500 home runs and 3,000 hits, Palmeiro - who has had a career cast in the background for so many years - appeared to be destined for baseball's Hall of Fame. That, at least, was the prevailing opinion until less than a week ago when the Orioles first baseman was suspended for 10 days on Monday after testing positive for steroids, making him - according to the results of a Tribune Publishing newspapers survey - now a long shot to gain admission to the halls of Cooperstown, N.Y. In the survey, conducted among 147 of the approximately 500 Baseball Writers' Association of America members who are eligible to vote on Hall of Fame entry, only 20 percent of the respondents said they would vote to elect Palmeiro.
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