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NEWS
By Norris P. West and Norris P. West,Staff Writer | July 2, 1992
The nation's largest rotisserie baseball statistics keeper has filed a "computer programming malpractice" lawsuit, claiming faulty software caused it to suspend its operations early in the 1992 Major League Baseball season.USA Stats Inc. of Baltimore filed the $500,000 suit Monday in U.S. District Court in Baltimore against Bradley T. Marshall, who operated the Bradley T. Marshall Co. in Washington. Mr. Marshall said yesterday that his software program was not responsible for the shutdown in April.
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BUSINESS
By Chris Korman, The Baltimore Sun | October 6, 2012
The opening scene of the movie "Moneyball" is a grainy close-up of Johnny Damon batting for the Oakland Athletics. Damon becomes the movie's pivotal point, a primary example of a player paid more than stats say he is worth. That surprised Loyola University Maryland economics professor Stephen Walters. He used the sort of advanced statistical analysis championed by the film and the book that inspired it to advise then-Boston Red Sox general manager, Dan Duquette, that signing Damon in fact made a great deal of financial sense.
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NEWS
By Norris P. West and Norris P. West,Staff Writer | July 1, 1992
The nation's largest rotisserie baseball statistics keeper has filed a "computer programming malpractice" lawsuit, claiming faulty software caused it to suspend its operations early in the 1992 Major League Baseball season.USA Stats Inc. of Baltimore filed the $500,000 suit Monday in U.S. District Court in Baltimore against Bradley T. Marshall, who operated the Bradley T. Marshall Co. in Washington.But even if USA Stats wins, it may have a tough time collecting. Mr. Marshall said yesterday that his software program was not responsible for the shutdown in April.
SPORTS
By Kevin Van Valkenburg, The Baltimore Sun | April 11, 2011
Matt Wieters, the man Baseball Prospectus dubbed one of the "most disappointing prospects of all time," leaned against his locker recently and chuckled as he listened to the question. Is it possible, the Orioles catcher was asked, that you've been called overrated and over-hyped so frequently in your brief career that the pendulum has swung back and you can now be considered underrated? "I don't know," Wieters said, breaking into a thin smile. "I don't think you can really worry about it, because once that first pitch is thrown, all those ratings don't really mean much.
SPORTS
By Norris P. West and Norris P. West,Staff Writer | February 21, 1992
While major-league pitchers are just limbering up for spring training, the legal fastballs are already flying in the competitive business of "Rotisserie league" baseball statistics.Baltimore-based USA Stats Inc. fired a strike yesterday when it won an injunction in U.S. District Court in Baltimore that temporarily stops a New York competitor from marketing its Rotisserie stat service.U.S. District Judge William N. Nickerson issued the restraining order yesterday against Rotisserie League Baseball Association Inc., which the Baltimore company says stole its marketing ideas by duplicating its sales literature.
FEATURES
By Mike Royko and Mike Royko,Tribune Media Services | October 19, 1990
AT THIS MOMENT, the most feverish baseball fan in America has to be Ron Berler, a Chicago writer and teacher.No one has more at stake on this World Series. Others may have big bets or a psychological attachment. But Berler's claim to baseball immortality hangs in the balance.Berler is something like a mad scientist. He loves to pore over heaps of baseball statistics and history, trying to find hidden truths and secret meanings, looking for that great discovery.A few years ago, he did it. He discovered the Ex-Cub Factor, one of the most amazing baseball statistics in modern times.
SPORTS
By CHILDS WALKER and CHILDS WALKER,SUN REPORTER | May 21, 2006
For those who delight in baseball statistics like a gourmand savors fine cuisine, Barry Bonds equals a heavenly lobster mousse laced with the bitter aftertaste of brussels sprouts. He gave many of us the greatest ecstasy we've known, and yet we can't reconcile him. When Bonds was going great guns a few years back, each week seemed to produce another statistical revelation. My favorite came from Dayn Perry of Baseball Prospectus, who figured that for a starting pitcher to reproduce Bonds' value in 2004, he would have to post a 0.77 ERA over 247 innings.
BUSINESS
By Chris Korman, The Baltimore Sun | October 6, 2012
The opening scene of the movie "Moneyball" is a grainy close-up of Johnny Damon batting for the Oakland Athletics. Damon becomes the movie's pivotal point, a primary example of a player paid more than stats say he is worth. That surprised Loyola University Maryland economics professor Stephen Walters. He used the sort of advanced statistical analysis championed by the film and the book that inspired it to advise then-Boston Red Sox general manager, Dan Duquette, that signing Damon in fact made a great deal of financial sense.
SPORTS
By Kevin Van Valkenburg, The Baltimore Sun | April 11, 2011
Matt Wieters, the man Baseball Prospectus dubbed one of the "most disappointing prospects of all time," leaned against his locker recently and chuckled as he listened to the question. Is it possible, the Orioles catcher was asked, that you've been called overrated and over-hyped so frequently in your brief career that the pendulum has swung back and you can now be considered underrated? "I don't know," Wieters said, breaking into a thin smile. "I don't think you can really worry about it, because once that first pitch is thrown, all those ratings don't really mean much.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | June 13, 2010
By his own calculations, David Rubenstein, the Baltimore-born businessman and philanthropist, has just a couple of short decades left to make his mark on the planet. "I'm 60 now," Rubenstein says." "I'm running out of time. The average white man my age can expect to live to age 81, and before I die, I'd like to make an impact on the world. I'd like to have been truly transformative in at least one area." The sense of urgency is striking, if somewhat puzzling. Rubenstein is the son of a postal carrier and homemaker who grew up in a blue-collar enclave in Northwest Baltimore.
SPORTS
By CHILDS WALKER and CHILDS WALKER,SUN REPORTER | May 21, 2006
For those who delight in baseball statistics like a gourmand savors fine cuisine, Barry Bonds equals a heavenly lobster mousse laced with the bitter aftertaste of brussels sprouts. He gave many of us the greatest ecstasy we've known, and yet we can't reconcile him. When Bonds was going great guns a few years back, each week seemed to produce another statistical revelation. My favorite came from Dayn Perry of Baseball Prospectus, who figured that for a starting pitcher to reproduce Bonds' value in 2004, he would have to post a 0.77 ERA over 247 innings.
NEWS
By Norris P. West and Norris P. West,Staff Writer | July 2, 1992
The nation's largest rotisserie baseball statistics keeper has filed a "computer programming malpractice" lawsuit, claiming faulty software caused it to suspend its operations early in the 1992 Major League Baseball season.USA Stats Inc. of Baltimore filed the $500,000 suit Monday in U.S. District Court in Baltimore against Bradley T. Marshall, who operated the Bradley T. Marshall Co. in Washington. Mr. Marshall said yesterday that his software program was not responsible for the shutdown in April.
NEWS
By Norris P. West and Norris P. West,Staff Writer | July 1, 1992
The nation's largest rotisserie baseball statistics keeper has filed a "computer programming malpractice" lawsuit, claiming faulty software caused it to suspend its operations early in the 1992 Major League Baseball season.USA Stats Inc. of Baltimore filed the $500,000 suit Monday in U.S. District Court in Baltimore against Bradley T. Marshall, who operated the Bradley T. Marshall Co. in Washington.But even if USA Stats wins, it may have a tough time collecting. Mr. Marshall said yesterday that his software program was not responsible for the shutdown in April.
SPORTS
By Norris P. West and Norris P. West,Staff Writer | February 21, 1992
While major-league pitchers are just limbering up for spring training, the legal fastballs are already flying in the competitive business of "Rotisserie league" baseball statistics.Baltimore-based USA Stats Inc. fired a strike yesterday when it won an injunction in U.S. District Court in Baltimore that temporarily stops a New York competitor from marketing its Rotisserie stat service.U.S. District Judge William N. Nickerson issued the restraining order yesterday against Rotisserie League Baseball Association Inc., which the Baltimore company says stole its marketing ideas by duplicating its sales literature.
FEATURES
By Mike Royko and Mike Royko,Tribune Media Services | October 19, 1990
AT THIS MOMENT, the most feverish baseball fan in America has to be Ron Berler, a Chicago writer and teacher.No one has more at stake on this World Series. Others may have big bets or a psychological attachment. But Berler's claim to baseball immortality hangs in the balance.Berler is something like a mad scientist. He loves to pore over heaps of baseball statistics and history, trying to find hidden truths and secret meanings, looking for that great discovery.A few years ago, he did it. He discovered the Ex-Cub Factor, one of the most amazing baseball statistics in modern times.
SPORTS
July 8, 1993
The Western Maryland College women's softball team, along with its standout pitcher Marilyn Naas of Bethesda (Walter Johnson High), earned spots in several categories in the final 1993 NCAA Division III statistics.Naas, a junior right-hander and the team's Most Valuable Player, averaged 4.5 strikeouts per seven innings to place 18th in that department.The three-time Middle Atlantic Conference All-Star struck out 59 batters in 91 innings as she won 11 times in 13 decisions. Her 1.00 ERA was instrumental in the team's final 1.74 earned run average, good for 24th in Division III.Western Maryland, which won its first MAC title in 1993, endedup 17th in triples after slugging 12 three-baggers in 21 games for an average of 0.57 per contest.
NEWS
June 29, 2010
As a loyal O's fan, I urge you to stop your daily printing of "The bottom line." It prominently displays how our 2010 Orioles compare with the worst teams in franchise and major league history. Nobody could have predicted how several key injuries and a lack of timely offensive support would translate into our current miserable record. Printing this reminder every day hurts the community and its sense of pride in the local team. It hurts ticket sales and tax revenue for a city struggling to make ends meet.
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