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NEWS
By Jeff Barker and Jeff Barker,SUN STAFF | March 17, 2005
WASHINGTON - A House committee refused yesterday to grant immunity to any of a half-dozen current and former baseball stars expected as mostly reluctant witnesses today for a hearing aimed at uncovering the truth about steroid use in their sport. The House Committee on Government Reform hearing was to go on as scheduled even though most of the players initially wavered about appearing and hired lawyers either to win immunity from prosecution or get them excused. "No witnesses have been or will be offered immunity," committee spokesman David Marin said.
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SPORTS
By Childs Walker, The Baltimore Sun | July 12, 2014
Nelson Cruz presents a deep rooting dilemma for the modern baseball fan. Is the Orioles outfielder the well-mannered son of teachers who built himself into a slugger step by painstaking step? In this version of the story, Cruz is the perfect baseball hero - a humble guy from the northwest coast of the Dominican Republic with Popeye forearms and a beatific countenance, one who belts home runs at a league-leading pace and still takes time to say hello to his young fans. Or is he just another in the stained mass of baseball stars who seemingly took the easy way out by turning to performance-enhancing drugs?
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SPORTS
By MIKE LITTWIN | March 24, 1991
If Bo Jackson's sporting career is over, that would make him the last of the great baseball stars, and even he didn't exactly qualify. He was a hybrid, a baseball-football freak whose like we hadn't seen since Jim Thorpe. And it took a shoe commercial to make him really famous anyway.Where are the great baseball stars? I mean real stars, Ruthian stars, where-have-you-gone-Joe-DiMaggio stars? Mickey Mantle, Willie Mays, Hammerin' Hank stars?As far as I can tell, there aren't any, even though baseball, as a game, is bigger, grander, more popular than ever, or haven't you tried pricing baseball cards lately?
SPORTS
By Dan Connolly, The Baltimore Sun | June 3, 2014
When baseball commissioner Bud Selig said recently that Baltimore was a "very, very viable candidate" to host the 2016 All-Star Game at Camden Yards, those who have sought for the Midsummer Classic's return to the city for years received a boost to their hopes. The Orioles organization isn't commenting publicly on Selig's words, however, because it doesn't want to be viewed as campaigning for the annual event, which has been held in Baltimore twice. The American League won, 9-3, in 1993 at Camden Yards in the second season of the stadium's existence.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 25, 2007
Off to see the `Wicked' Yep, I think we're in Oz. Subtitled "The Untold Story of the Witches of Oz," the blockbuster musical Wicked is taking up residence at the Hippodrome through Feb. 18, starring Victoria Matlock as Elphaba, as the Wicked Witch of the West is known; Christina DeCicco as Glinda, the Good Witch; and P.J. Benjamin as the Wizard. Based on Gregory Maguire's 1995 novel - a prequel to The Wizard of Oz -Wicked has a score by Stephen Schwartz and a book by Winnie Holzman.
SPORTS
By Ruth Sadler and Ruth Sadler,Staff Writer | July 10, 1993
At Upper Deck All-Star FanFest, collectors will see a lot of memorabilia -- of baseball's past, international baseball, the minor leagues -- and they'll be able to see memorabilia being made.The exhibit is called Making of the Game, and Major League Baseball licensees will make items fans can buy, everything from baseball equipment to souvenir T-shirts.Rawlings will be making bats, gloves and balls. Wilson will be making balls.Curious about how spiked shoes are made? See Nike. Russell will demonstrate uniform-making.
TOPIC
By Jonathan Pitts and Jonathan Pitts,SUN STAFF | March 20, 2005
WASHINGTON -- Congressman Mark Souder had had enough. It was late in the afternoon of an unexpectedly long day in Room 2154 of the Sam Rayburn Building, and the Indiana Republican, along with his colleagues on the House Committee on Government Reform, had just heard the testimony of five current and former big-league baseball stars on steroid use. Top baseball executives wouldn't take the stand until later, but two things were already clear. First, the use of illicit performance-enhancing drugs is an urgent problem in America.
NEWS
By SALLY BUCKLER | July 22, 1993
It was the midsummer classic in Baltimore last week. Folks flocked to Oriole Park at Camden Yards to see some great ballplayers and to watch the annual All-Star game. Here in western Howard County, we have baseball stars, too.At the top of the list of local heroes is third baseman Brian Boteler, who just finished his junior year at Glenelg High School. Brian won kudos from the local newspapers and he was the outstanding player on the Glenelg High School varsity baseball team, which won the state championship in its 2A Division.
SPORTS
By Childs Walker, The Baltimore Sun | July 12, 2014
Nelson Cruz presents a deep rooting dilemma for the modern baseball fan. Is the Orioles outfielder the well-mannered son of teachers who built himself into a slugger step by painstaking step? In this version of the story, Cruz is the perfect baseball hero - a humble guy from the northwest coast of the Dominican Republic with Popeye forearms and a beatific countenance, one who belts home runs at a league-leading pace and still takes time to say hello to his young fans. Or is he just another in the stained mass of baseball stars who seemingly took the easy way out by turning to performance-enhancing drugs?
NEWS
By VICKI WELLFORD | January 31, 1995
The Arundel Senior High School Wildcat baseball team is holding a baseball card show from 9:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday in the cafeteria.The event features former Arundel High ace Denny Neagle, who now pitches for the Pittsburgh Pirates. Denny will autograph flat items for $2 and ball or bats for $3.Denny will be joined by former Arundel players -- now minor leaguers -- Josh Bullock, Brian Rolocut and Zach Collins and former Old Mill star Mark Foster. Autographs will cost $1. A silent auction of sport memorabilia will be held.
TRAVEL
By Josh Noel and Josh Noel,Tribune Newspapers | July 12, 2009
ST. LOUIS - -This is a great baseball town. Cardinals fans know to applaud for a sacrifice bunt, especially when laid down by their pitcher. They know not to applaud when the other team ties the score on a sacrifice fly, even though it means an out for the opponent. They dress in red as if it were the only color on the racks. And this is a terrible baseball town. The food at Busch Stadium, which opened in 2006, is especially bad; ask 10 Cardinals fans about the best grub in the park, and eight will say the nachos, which are basically the same nachos you find at every other park.
NEWS
By Glenn Graham | April 23, 2008
Talk to Oakland Mills senior pitcher-first baseman Jeff Randolph for a few minutes about baseball, and it comes as no surprise that he first began playing T-ball when he was 5. Randolph, a captain and the team's No. 1 starter on the mound, loves the game and knows it well. In his fourth season starting on varsity, he's hitting .371 with eight RBIs and is 2-1 with one save and a 1.12 ERA. Along with baseball, Randolph was the starting center on the Scorpions' basketball team last winter and has been in the school's ROTC program for four years.
SPORTS
By Dan Connolly and Dan Connolly,Sun reporter | July 12, 2007
SAN FRANCISCO -- Officially, Tuesday's 5-4 win will go down as another American League All-Star Game victory during one of the most lopsided periods in the sport's history. But it sure didn't feel like it for the AL squad, which hasn't lost to the National League since 1996 - including the infamous 2002 tie - a record-matching span of 11 games. "I have no theory at all," Minnesota Twins center fielder Torii Hunter said about the streak. "Those guys can play. You see those guys come back.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 25, 2007
Off to see the `Wicked' Yep, I think we're in Oz. Subtitled "The Untold Story of the Witches of Oz," the blockbuster musical Wicked is taking up residence at the Hippodrome through Feb. 18, starring Victoria Matlock as Elphaba, as the Wicked Witch of the West is known; Christina DeCicco as Glinda, the Good Witch; and P.J. Benjamin as the Wizard. Based on Gregory Maguire's 1995 novel - a prequel to The Wizard of Oz -Wicked has a score by Stephen Schwartz and a book by Winnie Holzman.
NEWS
By Jonathan D. Rockoff and Jonathan D. Rockoff,SUN STAFF | May 24, 2005
When Shonda Schilling, wife of baseball star Curt Schilling, recently established a $5,000 college scholarship for students graduating from her alma mater, Dundalk High School, it was much appreciated but no surprise in this close-knit, take-care-of-your own community. The high school annually dispenses as much as $200,000 in scholarships donated by alumni, residents and local businesses and civic groups, its principal said. The high school alumni association, which donates $5,000 each year, has 800 members, including several who never attended the school.
TOPIC
By Jonathan Pitts and Jonathan Pitts,SUN STAFF | March 20, 2005
WASHINGTON -- Congressman Mark Souder had had enough. It was late in the afternoon of an unexpectedly long day in Room 2154 of the Sam Rayburn Building, and the Indiana Republican, along with his colleagues on the House Committee on Government Reform, had just heard the testimony of five current and former big-league baseball stars on steroid use. Top baseball executives wouldn't take the stand until later, but two things were already clear. First, the use of illicit performance-enhancing drugs is an urgent problem in America.
NEWS
By Ross Hetrick and Ross Hetrick,Staff Writer | October 8, 1993
Dave Winfield has terrorized Major League pitchers for years, but he struck out with a Baltimore taxi driver.The wife of the black Minnesota Twins superstar has filed a complaint with the state Public Service Commission charging that the cabdriver refused to give her, her husband and relatives a ride, but moments later picked up six white men.When the Winfields asked the cabdriver for an explanation, he laughed at them, the complaint said."
SPORTS
By John Steadman | July 30, 1993
COOPERSTOWN, N.Y. -- Whether a clarion of enthusiasm or a hard-bitten cynic, every follower of baseball, the grandest game of all, should be compelled to make the pilgrimage.It's to this pristine setting in the foothills of the Catskills, on the shores of Lake Otsego, where the Seneca and Mohawk Indians once played, that the sport traces its birthright.The cradle of baseball has been established as Cooperstown, the place where Abner Doubleday chased the cows out of Elihu Phinney's pasture on an afternoon in 1839, and had the #i inspiration to invent a sport that stands irrefutably as our national pastime.
NEWS
By Jeff Barker and Jeff Barker,SUN STAFF | March 18, 2005
WASHINGTON - Some of baseball's brightest stars uneasily testified yesterday about steroid use, but a House committee saved its fire for baseball executives, going so far as to question whether their sport still deserved its treasured exemption from antitrust laws. In an all-day hearing, the Committee on Government Reform had two targets: the celebrity ballplayers - including two Orioles and a defiant Mark McGwire - and the sport's governing officials. Mostly, it threw softballs at the players while pelting commissioner Bud Selig and his aides with inside heat.
NEWS
By Jeff Barker and Jeff Barker,SUN STAFF | March 17, 2005
WASHINGTON - A House committee refused yesterday to grant immunity to any of a half-dozen current and former baseball stars expected as mostly reluctant witnesses today for a hearing aimed at uncovering the truth about steroid use in their sport. The House Committee on Government Reform hearing was to go on as scheduled even though most of the players initially wavered about appearing and hired lawyers either to win immunity from prosecution or get them excused. "No witnesses have been or will be offered immunity," committee spokesman David Marin said.
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