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NEWS
June 4, 1996
FOOTBALL is not baseball. There's less time to plan a new home for the Baltimore Ravens than was allotted to create Oriole Park at Camden Yards. There's only one B&O Warehouse. The South Baltimore waterfront can't be linked easily to the stadium because it's a couple of football fields away and separated by railroad tracks.Indeed, those defenses offered by the groups designing the National Football League stadium downtown -- the Maryland Stadium Authority, the Ravens and HOK Sports Facilities Group, the architects who planned Oriole Park -- are all true.
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SPORTS
By Sports Digest | June 27, 2010
Baseball Severna Park's Banks takes loss in his Astros debut Right-hander Josh Banks (Severna Park) took the loss for the Houston Astros on Saturday after being called up from Triple-A Round Rock and giving up six runs and eight hits in four-plus innings. The Rangers' Ian Kinsler ended a career-long 32-game homerless drought with a three-run tiebreaking shot off Banks in the fourth inning en route to a 7-2 victory as host Texas rebounded from its first loss in two weeks.
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NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | April 6, 1993
So this is where we have arrived: It is 25 years since Martin Luther King Jr.'s murder, and his spiritual heir, the Rev. Jesse L. Jackson, spends yesterday picketing outside Oriole Park at Camden Yards because he thinks the front-office integration of baseball is one of the most pressing problems facing black America.Memo to Jackson: If you'd walked just a few blocks slightly northwest of the baseball park yesterday, you'd have seen a street ironically called Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard, and a couple of blighted housing projects called Lexington Terrace and Poe Homes.
SPORTS
By BILL ORDINE and BILL ORDINE,SUN REPORTER | December 23, 2005
As contention builds, new D.C. stadium deal in danger Baseball's return to Washington was born in turmoil, and now - even after a giddy inaugural season - the wrangling just won't go away. America's simple game has been bedeviled by a host of complications in the nation's capital. There is debate over who pays for how much of a new stadium. The D.C. Council has engaged in political infighting, highlighted by Council member Marion Barry's trying to broker his own stadium agreement. The specter of a coming mayoral election hangs over the process.
SPORTS
By BILL ORDINE and BILL ORDINE,SUN REPORTER | December 23, 2005
As contention builds, new D.C. stadium deal in danger Baseball's return to Washington was born in turmoil, and now - even after a giddy inaugural season - the wrangling just won't go away. America's simple game has been bedeviled by a host of complications in the nation's capital. There is debate over who pays for how much of a new stadium. The D.C. Council has engaged in political infighting, highlighted by Council member Marion Barry's trying to broker his own stadium agreement. The specter of a coming mayoral election hangs over the process.
NEWS
April 12, 1992
Improved FormatYour newspaper is to be congratulated on improving the format of the index of death notices.It is much more readable with larger type, lower case for first names and space between the listing of names.Maurice F. LevieBaltimoreStadium FailingsIt is extremely rare for me to agree with your architecture writer, Edward Gunts. Of his two review articles in The Sunday Sun, March 22, it's 50-50.I agree wholeheartedly with Mr. Gunt's criticism of the design for the Teflon tent at the Christopher Columbus Center.
SPORTS
By Sports Digest | June 27, 2010
Baseball Severna Park's Banks takes loss in his Astros debut Right-hander Josh Banks (Severna Park) took the loss for the Houston Astros on Saturday after being called up from Triple-A Round Rock and giving up six runs and eight hits in four-plus innings. The Rangers' Ian Kinsler ended a career-long 32-game homerless drought with a three-run tiebreaking shot off Banks in the fourth inning en route to a 7-2 victory as host Texas rebounded from its first loss in two weeks.
SPORTS
By Ruth Sadler and Ruth Sadler,SUN STAFF | December 10, 1995
As a boy, Steve Wolf had two passions -- baseball and model trains.He used to draw pictures of ballparks and built working models of bridges and other structures for his train layout.Now the suburban Chicago graphic artist builds models of baseball parks, complete with working scoreboards and lights."I've been drawing pictures of ballparks since I can remember," he says. "I decided, why not build one? . . . I adore all the old ballparks of the past. Fields are all different. The outfields, the stands are all different."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Stroh and Michael Stroh,Sun Staff | April 12, 1999
It's spring, PC fans, and you know what that means: computer baseball.The national pastime inspires more computer geeks to create more entertainment software than any other subject save killing. In a given year, nearly a dozen baseball titles line store shelves. And the '99 season is no different.Among the first games out of the chute this season are two of the best on the market: Triple Play 2000 (Electronic Arts; $39.95) and High Heat Baseball 2000 (3DO; $29.95).Triple Play is an arcade-style baseball game with more emphasis on adrenalin than simulating every nuance of the game.
NEWS
By Dan Morse and Dan Morse,SUN STAFF | August 4, 1996
BOSTON -- For Columbia homemaker Donna Greenwald, who aims to sing the national anthem in every Major League Baseball stadium, tension is part of the game.Audiences swell to 50,000. Microphones and acoustics are unpredictable. And there is the song itself -- a nightmare of a 13-note range that can crack the best of voices.But even trips to 15 of the 28 ballparks over the past four years didn't prepare the woman dubbed "Anthem Annie" for Friday night's trip to Boston's Fenway Park, stadium 16. Greenwald, 41, a dinner theater veteran with a golden soprano, almost didn't make it to the 7: 05 p.m. game.
SPORTS
By Jon Morgan and Jon Morgan,SUN STAFF | June 30, 2001
DETROIT - It doesn't get much better than this for a ballgame: The sky is blue, the temperature a delightful 74 and the Tigers are in the midst of a two-run, fourth-inning rally at their new stadium. Seated in a half-empty upper deck at Comerica Park, Jeff Nail, a 45-year-old manager for the U.S. Postal Service, is at a loss to explain why more people aren't here on this Sunday afternoon to enjoy the game. "They come down for the casinos. They come down for the festivals. And the traffic is always tied up when the Red Wings play," Nail said.
FEATURES
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | April 21, 2001
In 1952, when the first baseballs of the newly formed Roland Park Midget Baseball League Inc. were sailing through the air at Gilman School, the diminutive, passing steam engines of the old Maryland & Pennsylvania Railroad proved to be a constant source of amusement to players and consternation to coaches and umpires. It was quite common for games or practices to momentarily explode in unauthorized time outs if players heard the blast of a steam whistle riding the wind. That meant only one thing, a slowly chugging Ma & Pa train was nearby and preparing to blow for the Belvedere Avenue crossing.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Stroh and Michael Stroh,Sun Staff | April 12, 1999
It's spring, PC fans, and you know what that means: computer baseball.The national pastime inspires more computer geeks to create more entertainment software than any other subject save killing. In a given year, nearly a dozen baseball titles line store shelves. And the '99 season is no different.Among the first games out of the chute this season are two of the best on the market: Triple Play 2000 (Electronic Arts; $39.95) and High Heat Baseball 2000 (3DO; $29.95).Triple Play is an arcade-style baseball game with more emphasis on adrenalin than simulating every nuance of the game.
SPORTS
By Pat O'Malley and Pat O'Malley,SUN STAFF | April 12, 1998
Baseball has been an education, on and off the field, for Severna Park senior Pat Boucher.The third-ranked Falcons' ace right-hander has learned the importance of the mental facet of pitching and how much first impressions off the field can mean.Boucher, a three-year starter for the Falcons (7-1) off to a 3-0 start this spring, has learned to think more about what he's doing in a game and not to rely solely on the strength in his 6-foot-1, 200-pound body.An All-County designated hitter/right-handed pitcher as a junior after going 5-1 on the mound with a 2.73 ERA, Boucher also batted .357 with 24 RBIs, setting a county record for homers (11)
NEWS
By Dan Morse and Dan Morse,SUN STAFF | August 4, 1996
BOSTON -- For Columbia homemaker Donna Greenwald, who aims to sing the national anthem in every Major League Baseball stadium, tension is part of the game.Audiences swell to 50,000. Microphones and acoustics are unpredictable. And there is the song itself -- a nightmare of a 13-note range that can crack the best of voices.But even trips to 15 of the 28 ballparks over the past four years didn't prepare the woman dubbed "Anthem Annie" for Friday night's trip to Boston's Fenway Park, stadium 16. Greenwald, 41, a dinner theater veteran with a golden soprano, almost didn't make it to the 7: 05 p.m. game.
NEWS
June 4, 1996
FOOTBALL is not baseball. There's less time to plan a new home for the Baltimore Ravens than was allotted to create Oriole Park at Camden Yards. There's only one B&O Warehouse. The South Baltimore waterfront can't be linked easily to the stadium because it's a couple of football fields away and separated by railroad tracks.Indeed, those defenses offered by the groups designing the National Football League stadium downtown -- the Maryland Stadium Authority, the Ravens and HOK Sports Facilities Group, the architects who planned Oriole Park -- are all true.
FEATURES
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | April 21, 2001
In 1952, when the first baseballs of the newly formed Roland Park Midget Baseball League Inc. were sailing through the air at Gilman School, the diminutive, passing steam engines of the old Maryland & Pennsylvania Railroad proved to be a constant source of amusement to players and consternation to coaches and umpires. It was quite common for games or practices to momentarily explode in unauthorized time outs if players heard the blast of a steam whistle riding the wind. That meant only one thing, a slowly chugging Ma & Pa train was nearby and preparing to blow for the Belvedere Avenue crossing.
SPORTS
By Pat O'Malley and Pat O'Malley,SUN STAFF | April 12, 1998
Baseball has been an education, on and off the field, for Severna Park senior Pat Boucher.The third-ranked Falcons' ace right-hander has learned the importance of the mental facet of pitching and how much first impressions off the field can mean.Boucher, a three-year starter for the Falcons (7-1) off to a 3-0 start this spring, has learned to think more about what he's doing in a game and not to rely solely on the strength in his 6-foot-1, 200-pound body.An All-County designated hitter/right-handed pitcher as a junior after going 5-1 on the mound with a 2.73 ERA, Boucher also batted .357 with 24 RBIs, setting a county record for homers (11)
SPORTS
By Ruth Sadler and Ruth Sadler,SUN STAFF | December 10, 1995
As a boy, Steve Wolf had two passions -- baseball and model trains.He used to draw pictures of ballparks and built working models of bridges and other structures for his train layout.Now the suburban Chicago graphic artist builds models of baseball parks, complete with working scoreboards and lights."I've been drawing pictures of ballparks since I can remember," he says. "I decided, why not build one? . . . I adore all the old ballparks of the past. Fields are all different. The outfields, the stands are all different."
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | April 6, 1993
So this is where we have arrived: It is 25 years since Martin Luther King Jr.'s murder, and his spiritual heir, the Rev. Jesse L. Jackson, spends yesterday picketing outside Oriole Park at Camden Yards because he thinks the front-office integration of baseball is one of the most pressing problems facing black America.Memo to Jackson: If you'd walked just a few blocks slightly northwest of the baseball park yesterday, you'd have seen a street ironically called Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard, and a couple of blighted housing projects called Lexington Terrace and Poe Homes.
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