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By MIKE KLINGAMAN | May 18, 1991
Dallas Green is bushed. The former baseball manager has planted 250 pine trees and 200 azaleas on his land in recent weeks, and now it's time to sow the corn. Moreover, here comes his wife, Sylvia, with some dahlias that ought to be planted today.The asparagus needs picking and the lawn needs trimming. Dallas Green rattles off the lineup of chores and sighs. In the spring, every day demands extra innings for diligent gardeners."It's a madhouse this time of year. The grass grows so fast it's mind-boggling.
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TRAVEL
By Michelle Deal-Zimmerman, The Baltimore Sun | January 19, 2013
Famed Orioles baseball manager Earl Weaver died early Saturday aboard a cruise ship after spending nearly a week sailing the Caribbean surrounded by fans, friends and family. The 82-year-old Weaver was taking part in The Original Baltimore Baseball Cruise aboard the Celebrity Silhouette cruise ship, which departed from Fort Lauderdale last Sunday with an itinerary that included stops in Cozumel, Grand Cayman, Jamaica and Haiti. Cruisecritic.com, a website specializing in cruises and a gathering place for cruise-goers, reported that Weaver collapsed in his cabin and never regained consciousness.
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BUSINESS
By PETER H LEWIS and PETER H LEWIS,New York Times News Service | May 4, 1992
WARNING: This column is about obsession. It is also about using the personal computer to pursue a late-night hobby so addictive (and so stupid, some would say) that thousands of otherwise normal people are willing to risk friendships, jobs and even marriages to pursue it.The hobby is fantasy baseball on the Prodigy computer network.In its most benign manifestation, Prodigy Baseball Manager is an opportunity for armchair managers to assemble and manipulate a dream team of major-league athletes for a summer of fun.Would-be managers from across the continental United States can pit their teams against others in a computer-network league that uses real-life statistics, from the previous night's Major League Baseball games, to determine the outcome of their fantasy contests.
SPORTS
By Dan Connolly, The Baltimore Sun | September 29, 2011
No official decisions have been announced involving the futures of Orioles president of baseball operations Andy MacPhail or manager Buck Showalter. MacPhail and Showalter met with team owner Peter Angelos for several hours Thursday, but any resolution that might have resulted was not disclosed. One club source said a resolution is getting closer but nothing has been finalized. It is expected that MacPhail will resign from the post he has held since June 2007, but Angelos apparently wanted to talk with MacPhail about his decision and whether he would consider staying on in another capacity.
NEWS
December 4, 2007
Joseph Leo Mills Sr., a retired tool designer and semiprofessional baseball manager, died of congestive heart failure Thursday at his Overlea home. He was 96. Born in Hagerstown, he moved to Baltimore in 1939 and became a Glenn L. Martin Co. machinist. He attended night school and earned a mechanical drawing degree from the Maryland Institute. In 1943, he was awarded the Peabody Prize for design. He later worked at the Diecraft Corp. in Sparks. At his retirement 30 years ago, it was a Bausch & Lomb division.
TRAVEL
By Michelle Deal-Zimmerman, The Baltimore Sun | January 19, 2013
Famed Orioles baseball manager Earl Weaver died early Saturday aboard a cruise ship after spending nearly a week sailing the Caribbean surrounded by fans, friends and family. The 82-year-old Weaver was taking part in The Original Baltimore Baseball Cruise aboard the Celebrity Silhouette cruise ship, which departed from Fort Lauderdale last Sunday with an itinerary that included stops in Cozumel, Grand Cayman, Jamaica and Haiti. Cruisecritic.com, a website specializing in cruises and a gathering place for cruise-goers, reported that Weaver collapsed in his cabin and never regained consciousness.
SPORTS
By RICK MAESE | October 27, 2005
Houston --The Chicago White Sox were getting ready to play for a championship, eschewing critics and ghosts and curses. Their general manager, Ken Williams, sat in the dugout talking about his team's roster. He sees talent everywhere, but who's the most important? The team lacks the superstar, the future Hall of Famer. "Ozzie talks about team MVPs and such," Williams says. "I can't find one." I can't either, but I do know who the most valuable member of the team is. He doesn't swing a bat, he doesn't throw a pitch and he doesn't turn double plays.
SPORTS
By John Steadman | May 24, 1991
Racial serpents who wanted to maintain the status quo, keeping everything lily white, always insisted the reason you couldn't dare hire a black baseball manager is because it would be difficult, eventually, to fire him. The same with old heroes.Frank Robinson was representative of both segments of society to the Baltimore Orioles. He was black and a Hall of Fame member, after making profound contributions as a player to two world championship teams. He broke new ground, becoming the Orioles' first black manager and also was a hero-turned-manager.
SPORTS
By PHIL JACKMAN | April 25, 1995
There are probably as many Howard Cosell stories floating around as there are number of days the man trod the earth, which was in excess of 28,000 when he died Sunday.Here are a few of them, none of which either individually or collectively are designed to give us insight as to what manner of man Cosell was. If we couldn't come up with a satisfactory answer between 1953 and 1993, the years of his extremely public life, there's little chance of it occurring now.Of his oft-stated suggestion that he was the first person since Aristotle "To tell it like it is," New York columnist Jimmy Cannon wrote, "He's the first guy to put on a toupee and change his name [from Cohen]
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck,SUN STAFF | February 24, 1998
It is pushing 9 p.m. and the lights are still burning at The Law Offices of Peter Angelos. The Orioles principal owner has to work overtime to keep up with his burgeoning business empire, which stretches from his successful law practice to his baseball team to a proposed Inner Harbor hotel complex and beyond.The baseball team, predictably, gets the most public attention, providing enough headlines and headaches to make Angelos wonder why he ponied up $173 million to bail out the struggling franchise in 1993, but he has steered it into regular contention and -- it appears -- into a new era of stability and tranquility.
SPORTS
June 22, 2011
New senior circuit Phil Rogers Chicago Tribune Jack McKeon didn't get a four-year contract when the Marlins hired him to be their interim manager, so why not do what they're doing? McKeon is clearly a bridge guy to Ozzie Guillen, Bobby Valentine or someone else with marketing appeal, and his love of life and passion for baseball will help make the rest of 2011 as enjoyable as possible for South Florida fans. Hiring him as a 72-year-old seemed crazy, and he helped the Marlins win a championship.
SPORTS
By Jeff Zrebiec, The Baltimore Sun | March 31, 2011
They sat for hours, discussing the mutual acquaintances they've made over many years in the game, their philosophies on building a roster and what had become of the once-proud Orioles franchise. In a secluded cabin situated on a golf course about 45 minutes from where the floundering Orioles were playing a road game against the Texas Rangers last July, Andy MacPhail and Buck Showalter, polar opposites on the surface, found common ground. MacPhail, the Orioles' president of baseball operations whose rebuilding project was bursting at the seams, wanted a manager with a big persona and a lot of swagger, somebody to get the attention of a youthful and underachieving roster and inspire a defeated fan base.
NEWS
December 4, 2007
Joseph Leo Mills Sr., a retired tool designer and semiprofessional baseball manager, died of congestive heart failure Thursday at his Overlea home. He was 96. Born in Hagerstown, he moved to Baltimore in 1939 and became a Glenn L. Martin Co. machinist. He attended night school and earned a mechanical drawing degree from the Maryland Institute. In 1943, he was awarded the Peabody Prize for design. He later worked at the Diecraft Corp. in Sparks. At his retirement 30 years ago, it was a Bausch & Lomb division.
SPORTS
By RICK MAESE | October 27, 2005
Houston --The Chicago White Sox were getting ready to play for a championship, eschewing critics and ghosts and curses. Their general manager, Ken Williams, sat in the dugout talking about his team's roster. He sees talent everywhere, but who's the most important? The team lacks the superstar, the future Hall of Famer. "Ozzie talks about team MVPs and such," Williams says. "I can't find one." I can't either, but I do know who the most valuable member of the team is. He doesn't swing a bat, he doesn't throw a pitch and he doesn't turn double plays.
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck,SUN STAFF | February 24, 1998
It is pushing 9 p.m. and the lights are still burning at The Law Offices of Peter Angelos. The Orioles principal owner has to work overtime to keep up with his burgeoning business empire, which stretches from his successful law practice to his baseball team to a proposed Inner Harbor hotel complex and beyond.The baseball team, predictably, gets the most public attention, providing enough headlines and headaches to make Angelos wonder why he ponied up $173 million to bail out the struggling franchise in 1993, but he has steered it into regular contention and -- it appears -- into a new era of stability and tranquility.
NEWS
By Jon Morgan and Jon Morgan,SUN STAFF | August 2, 1996
They don't throw a pitch, drive in a run or snag a fly ball. But they're often the first blamed when the game is lost.Major-league baseball managers are held responsible for the performance of dozens of highly trained, sometimes idiosyncratic professionals, any one of whom may tip the scales from win to loss with a single play or lapse of concentration.Managers' scalps are demanded when the club falls short of expectations. And when their teams go on extended hot streaks, they are hailed as masters of the nuanced game.
SPORTS
June 22, 2011
New senior circuit Phil Rogers Chicago Tribune Jack McKeon didn't get a four-year contract when the Marlins hired him to be their interim manager, so why not do what they're doing? McKeon is clearly a bridge guy to Ozzie Guillen, Bobby Valentine or someone else with marketing appeal, and his love of life and passion for baseball will help make the rest of 2011 as enjoyable as possible for South Florida fans. Hiring him as a 72-year-old seemed crazy, and he helped the Marlins win a championship.
SPORTS
By John Steadman | November 2, 1992
Baseball's best manager, without even a semblance o discussion or debate, is Dave Johnson. And he doesn't have a job. A sad commentary and certainly a sorry indictment in an endeavor where teams supposedly are trying to win. That a man of his extraordinary skills remains among the unemployed is an embarrassment to a business that prefers to call itself a sport.Johnson has intelligence and credibility. He doesn't deal in a two-faced manner with players. They are kept aware of what's expected but, at the same time, not dunned.
SPORTS
By Pat O'Malley and Pat O'Malley,SUN STAFF | May 5, 1996
Strength up the middle with pitching as the anchor is where you win in baseball. Chesapeake's baseball team returned its top two pitchers this season, but graduated the rest of the main ingredients to success.All-County shortstop Billy Dierker, second-team All-County selections in catcher Luis Falcon and center fielder Matt Michalowicz, and second baseman Rob Redmond moved on, leaving returning junior All-County pitcher Jared Vogt and No. 2 man Ryan Moore to carry a huge load.Vogt is 5-2 including Thursday's crucial 3-2 victory over top-ranked Old Mill.
SPORTS
By PHIL JACKMAN | April 25, 1995
There are probably as many Howard Cosell stories floating around as there are number of days the man trod the earth, which was in excess of 28,000 when he died Sunday.Here are a few of them, none of which either individually or collectively are designed to give us insight as to what manner of man Cosell was. If we couldn't come up with a satisfactory answer between 1953 and 1993, the years of his extremely public life, there's little chance of it occurring now.Of his oft-stated suggestion that he was the first person since Aristotle "To tell it like it is," New York columnist Jimmy Cannon wrote, "He's the first guy to put on a toupee and change his name [from Cohen]
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