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By Michael Pakenham | November 22, 1998
"Baseball in Baltimore: The First 100 Years," by James H. Bready (Johns Hopkins. 246 pages. $34.95)."Gaining a Yard: The Building of Baltimore's Football Stadium," by Jon Morgan, photography by Doug Kapustin (Baltimore Sun. 157 pages. $29.95).Out of concern for credibility and fairness, these pages recognize books written by staff members of The Sun, but we do not attempt to scrutinize them as with books by outsiders. We wish our colleagues well. The fact that they write for this newspaper may be taken to mean that we admire their professionalism and artfulness.
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NEWS
August 29, 2014
Ever notice that wan and languid look worn by Major League Baseball players and fans this year? That is not the lingering affects of steroid withdrawal. It is the unmistakable sign that baseball is dying. The lifeblood of wonderment and argument is passing from the game with every challenge and replay. Recently, Adam Jones closed on a ground ball single with the alacrity of a cheetah on the hunt. He picked up the ball and dead aimed it at home plate where the catcher snagged it. The glove was thrust at the runner who had dared to test the arm of the outfielder: Bang, bang, out!
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NEWS
March 26, 1995
Two former Baltimore Orioles players top the list of participants in a public panel discussion on the major league baseball strike at 7:30 p.m. April 4 in McDaniel Hall Lounge on the Western Maryland College campus.Entitled "When the Cheering Stopped: Can Baseball Recover from the Strike?" the discussion will center on the strike's impact on baseball fans.Featured panel members include Larry Sheets, an outfielder and designated hitter with the Orioles from 1984 to 1989 who was voted the club's Most Valuable Player after the 1987 season.
SPORTS
By Childs Walker, The Baltimore Sun | October 8, 2012
After 15 years of waiting for playoff baseball at Camden Yards, Orioles fans had to endure an extra 21/2 hours as chilly rain pushed back the start of Sunday's division series opener against the hated New York Yankees. A mighty roar shook the stadium when the grounds crew peeled away the protective tarp at 8 p.m., conveying just how badly Baltimore fans wanted their October moment. The crowd didn't grow quiet until the Yankees scored five runs in the ninth inning on their way to a 7-2 victory.
NEWS
By Andrew Ratner | May 11, 1996
BASEBALL IN Baltimore, as we have known it, has been threatened this season, and the blame doesn't lie with millionaire ballplayers, greedy owners or even the home-plate ump. In fact, we have been asking for this all along:Home Team Sports on basic cable.Area fans have long pined to have the local sports-cable channel, which carries most of the Orioles' games, included in their regular cable package. You could always buy it extra, for $15 or so a month. But most folks feel their cable bill is high enough and couldn't convince themselves (or their spouses)
FEATURES
By WAYNE HARDIN | July 24, 1994
There still might be a ballpark down there.Beneath the tons of dirt and landfill that rise up into a great flat hill off Old Annapolis Road once sat Westport Stadium, a baseball park where Negro League teams played."
NEWS
By Mark Hyman and John W. Frece Peter Schmuck of The Sun's sports staff and Gelareh Asayesh of The Sun's metropolitan staff contributed to this article | June 7, 1991
William Donald Schaefer found out the way most Baltimore Orioles fans did. He read it in the morning paper.Kurt L. Schmoke didn't get any notice either.But when the two high-ranking fans heard yesterday that Orioles principal owner Eli S. Jacobs had decided to consider offers for his baseball team, they said they weren't totally surprised."You have to understand Mr. Jacobs. He's a brilliant businessman. He's possibly the most intense businessman I have ever known in my life," Governor Schaefer said.
SPORTS
By JOHN EISENBERG | April 7, 1991
This city's loyal and many baseball fans should think of th Orioles' upcoming season as the sweet before the stomachache, a today to be savored before a tomorrow that could get unpleasant. Call it the Last Innocent Season.The lines of the matter are all straight for right now. The 1991 Orioles are more potent than 1990, capable of winning the AL East. The players are young, appealing. The front office upgraded the product over the winter. Everyone is happy. It should be an entertaining season.
NEWS
By Jon Morgan and Jon Morgan,Evening Sun Staff NjB | June 7, 1991
`TC Forget the Orioles' young players, the allure of the new stadium, and the possible end of the region's economic slump. The profitability of baseball -- especially baseball in Baltimore -- has entered a season of uncertainty that may very well make this the perfect time to sell.Oriole owner Eli S. Jacobs has hired an investment banker to consider some offers for the team he bought in 1988. He says he was unprepared for the demands of owning a major-league team, and the spotlight it focuses on him.But Jacobs is also a savvy businessman, and some experts in baseball economics think the spectacular growth in baseball's popularity during the 1980s may have reached a plateau.
SPORTS
By John Steadman | June 3, 1994
His passion for the sport is such that Tim Nordbrook, who played his way to the major leagues and stayed for parts of six seasons, is eager to make a contribution of his own."I just want kids to have a chance to fall in love with baseball," is how he explained the desire. When the words are measured for their significance there's a realization they couldn't be said with more eloquence or sensitivity.Nordbrook heads a project involving inner-city youth that surely will serve a need. He's embarking on the establishment of organized leagues to introduce youngsters, ages 7 to 10, to the ABCs of the game -- how to throw, catch and swing the bat.The fields will be scaled to size to fit their physical abilities because there's no reason to have the normal base-line dimensions of 90 feet and the pitching distance of 60 feet, six inches, overwhelm them.
FEATURES
April 5, 1999
Good morning. Today is the eighth Opening Day at Oriole Park at Camden Yards. But this spring ritual is much more than a stat.Meet Josh Barmer, a 12-year-old from Aberdeen, who breaks in a new glove every season. Larry Schulmeister, a hospital chaplain, lives close enough to Camden Yards to hear the crack of the bat. A bell captain at Harbor Court Hotel, Joe Kennick can literally smell Opening Day. And there's Vince Poist at Pickles Pub, where today is a national holiday. Camden Yards is their livelihood, their love, their passion and their pastime.
FEATURES
By Michael Pakenham | November 22, 1998
"Baseball in Baltimore: The First 100 Years," by James H. Bready (Johns Hopkins. 246 pages. $34.95)."Gaining a Yard: The Building of Baltimore's Football Stadium," by Jon Morgan, photography by Doug Kapustin (Baltimore Sun. 157 pages. $29.95).Out of concern for credibility and fairness, these pages recognize books written by staff members of The Sun, but we do not attempt to scrutinize them as with books by outsiders. We wish our colleagues well. The fact that they write for this newspaper may be taken to mean that we admire their professionalism and artfulness.
NEWS
By TAMARA IKENBERG | October 19, 1997
It's over. World Series dreams have shattered. Time to reflect on a glorious season and a special Sunday afternoon at Camden Yards:It was about a million degrees, I couldn't smoke, I had a wicked hangover and, though I'd been in Baltimore six months, this was my first Orioles game. Utter blasphemy in the eyes of this baseball-obsessed city.I only bought the tickets because an Oriole-worshiping friend was visiting from out of town.We had great seats."These are great seats!""I know; I paid $50 for them."
FEATURES
By Ken Fuson and Ken Fuson,SUN STAFF Sun theater critic (and Cleveland native) J. Wynn Rousuck contributed to this article | October 8, 1997
We have the bay. They have the lake.We have "Homicide." They have "Drew Carey."We had the Colts. They had the Browns (and will again some day).This is difficult. The cities of Baltimore and Cleveland have so much in common that tonight's first game of the American League Championship Series resembles a family reunion softball game.We're the 18th largest metropolitan area. They're the 20th.We have Fells Point. They have The Flats.We have Roberto Alomar. They have his brother, Sandy.This is hard.
NEWS
By Rafael Alvarez | October 20, 1996
Sixteen years ago I wandered Manhattan for The Sun to ask 100 New Yorkers a simple question: "What is the first thing that comes to mind when you think of Baltimore?"Two recurring answers emerged. One-fifth said "nothing" occurred to them regarding Baltimore. More than a third said "the Orioles," who then reigned as champions of the American League.I was back in Gotham last weekend, hopeful that the Birds would regain that title as they met the Yankees for the right to represent the American League in the coming World Series.
NEWS
By Andrew Ratner | May 11, 1996
BASEBALL IN Baltimore, as we have known it, has been threatened this season, and the blame doesn't lie with millionaire ballplayers, greedy owners or even the home-plate ump. In fact, we have been asking for this all along:Home Team Sports on basic cable.Area fans have long pined to have the local sports-cable channel, which carries most of the Orioles' games, included in their regular cable package. You could always buy it extra, for $15 or so a month. But most folks feel their cable bill is high enough and couldn't convince themselves (or their spouses)
NEWS
By Rafael Alvarez | October 20, 1996
Sixteen years ago I wandered Manhattan for The Sun to ask 100 New Yorkers a simple question: "What is the first thing that comes to mind when you think of Baltimore?"Two recurring answers emerged. One-fifth said "nothing" occurred to them regarding Baltimore. More than a third said "the Orioles," who then reigned as champions of the American League.I was back in Gotham last weekend, hopeful that the Birds would regain that title as they met the Yankees for the right to represent the American League in the coming World Series.
SPORTS
By PETER SCHMUCK | October 4, 1992
The 1992 baseball season has gone by in a blur. The Oriole have excelled on the field and at the box office. The new ballpark is an unparalleled success. The fans even woke up briefly on Monday night. What a way to start a new era of baseball in Baltimore.What better time to pause and reflect. Indeed, what better time for the Fifth Annual Golden Schmuck Awards, which are presented each year for dubious achievement on and off the field.This is the only major awards program that is prestigious enough to be conducted on a last-name basis.
NEWS
March 26, 1995
Two former Baltimore Orioles players top the list of participants in a public panel discussion on the major league baseball strike at 7:30 p.m. April 4 in McDaniel Hall Lounge on the Western Maryland College campus.Entitled "When the Cheering Stopped: Can Baseball Recover from the Strike?" the discussion will center on the strike's impact on baseball fans.Featured panel members include Larry Sheets, an outfielder and designated hitter with the Orioles from 1984 to 1989 who was voted the club's Most Valuable Player after the 1987 season.
FEATURES
By WAYNE HARDIN | July 24, 1994
There still might be a ballpark down there.Beneath the tons of dirt and landfill that rise up into a great flat hill off Old Annapolis Road once sat Westport Stadium, a baseball park where Negro League teams played."
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