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NEWS
By Joyce S. Brown | June 30, 1995
For all the history of griefAn empty doorway anda maple leaf.--MacleishFor all the history of love,a boy's hand waving$ in a baseball glove.on the side of a truck,two foot letters in fadedorange,startle me at the stop light.Evangelism on wheels, likebloodand books and meals? Then Iseethe smaller print: GuaranteedOvernight Delivery. Ah --the world is fallen indeed,for even summer sun's rising,though probable, can't beguaranteed,nor human breath, when# night delivers day.
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SPORTS
By Tribune newspapers | June 10, 2011
Last December, Bobby Wilson married a woman he met in 2004 while playing minor league baseball in Cedar Rapids, Iowa. But the Angels' reserve catcher readily admits she was not his first love. Wilson wistfully recalled that his first soul mate had a nice tan, leathery skin and a musky scent he found intoxicating. The two were inseparable for five years. And his wife isn't even jealous. That's because the object of Wilson's affection was a Rawlings infielder's mitt he got when he was 5 years old. "I don't think that glove left my side for five years," says Wilson, 28. "I carried it to school with me. As soon as we got home, we played baseball until dinner.
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FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | April 11, 1992
I was in the middle of getting the air out of the house water pipes, when one of my kids wanted me to play catch with him in the alley.Getting the air hammer or "bang" out of the pipes turned out to be pretty easy. I shut the main water feed off, then opened one cold water faucet on the third floor, the highest point in our house. Next I turned on another faucet in the basement sink, the lowest point in our plumbing system. This drained all the water out of the pipes. Finally I closed both faucets, and turned the main water feed back on. It worked.
SPORTS
By Matt Vensel | June 7, 2011
In case you missed it, Kevin Cowherd wrote a column for Monday’s newspaper on proper fan etiquette at Camden Yards. To sum it up, don’t drop your kid if a ball is hit to you. Don’t throw elbows and box out someone else’s kid to catch a foul ball. And whatever you do, don’t ever bring your baseball glove to the ballpark if you are legally old enough to drive yourself there. All no-brainers, right? But I would like to make one amendment to Cowherd’s list : If a fly ball is hit toward your seat, it is totally acceptable use a popcorn bucket to catch it like this Kansas City Royals fan did on Monday . It might not be as manly as catching it with your bare hand -- wearing jorts and a tank top will help compensate for that -- but you will score points with old guys wearing Tommy Bahama shirts.
SPORTS
March 10, 2009
1 Familiar faces: Look in the stands at the Orioles-Red Sox exhibition game (1 p.m., MASN), and you might see some of the same Boston fans who come to Camden Yards. 2 Shining moments: Tonight's conference finals are connected, sort of: the Summit (8, ESPN2), Horizon (9, ESPN) and Sun Belt (10, ESPN2). 3 Sour notes: The Capitals are skidding a bit, but they're in Nashville (8 p.m., Comcast SportsNet), so someone can write a sad song about it if they lose again. 4 Run carefully: Three World Baseball Classic games are on TV (5 p.m., ESPN2; 6:30 and 10 p.m., MLB Network)
FEATURES
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 15, 1999
Thanks to technology and a retired baseball coach with an engineering degree, kids have a new way to answer one of life's most pressing questions: How fast can they throw a baseball?The coach, Albert E. Dilz, 68, has created a tiny radar device that attaches to the back of a baseball glove and measures the velocity of an incoming ball. Dilz, of Cincinnati, calls his invention Glove Radar and plans to start selling it for $79.95.Glove Radar will sell for less than half the price of radar guns.
SPORTS
By Matt Vensel | June 7, 2011
In case you missed it, Kevin Cowherd wrote a column for Monday’s newspaper on proper fan etiquette at Camden Yards. To sum it up, don’t drop your kid if a ball is hit to you. Don’t throw elbows and box out someone else’s kid to catch a foul ball. And whatever you do, don’t ever bring your baseball glove to the ballpark if you are legally old enough to drive yourself there. All no-brainers, right? But I would like to make one amendment to Cowherd’s list : If a fly ball is hit toward your seat, it is totally acceptable use a popcorn bucket to catch it like this Kansas City Royals fan did on Monday . It might not be as manly as catching it with your bare hand -- wearing jorts and a tank top will help compensate for that -- but you will score points with old guys wearing Tommy Bahama shirts.
NEWS
By NICK SHIELDS and NICK SHIELDS,SUN REPORTER | March 19, 2006
About 8 a.m. yesterday, Lisa Magness learned from a TV news report that the Baltimore Orioles had scheduled tryouts for ballboys and ballgirls in an hour. She and her father, John, scoured their home for a baseball glove. By 9:15 a.m., they were in the visitors' dugout at Camden Yards. Magness, 21, of Severna Park was one of only 11 people who braved the crisp morning winds for the tryouts. Heather Bressler, in-game entertainment coordinator for the Orioles, said 75 people showed up two years ago for tryouts.
NEWS
By Andrew Ratner | October 4, 2001
HOW MY collection began I'm not quite sure. A miniature copy of Cal Ripken's bat, including his signature on the barrel, about the size of your pinky. A toy bus that plays part of the speech he gave the night he broke Lou Gehrig's record when you push down its front wheels. A lamp switch that resembles a Wheaties box with Cal's picture on it. Why I began accumulating this stuff I'm not sure either. I've always been a bit of a pack rat. Part of me figured the stuff might have value someday, like the ads and trinkets from the 1920s and '30s bearing Babe Ruth's image that are displayed at his birthplace museum in Baltimore's Ridgely's Delight.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann, The Baltimore Sun | November 10, 2010
The midshipman put his mark on his Rawlings Primo right-handed baseball glove, embroidering his name onto the thumb. A U.S. Naval Academy classmate wrote the number "5" and a reference to religious scripture — Philippians 4:13 — on the pinky of his Rawlings Pro Preferred. The person who authorities believe stole the gloves and hawked them on eBay didn't try to obscure the tell-tale markings, and that made it easy for undercover agents with the Naval Criminal Investigative Service to hop on the Internet auction site and buy back the gloves.
SPORTS
By Katherine Dunn, The Baltimore Sun | April 27, 2011
Santina Busch started playing softball after she found a glove when she was 8. Since then, she has played three sports, including 12 varsity seasons at Patapsco. In her senior year, she has been the captain of the soccer, basketball and softball teams. For Busch, however, sports have played such a pivotal role that she says they changed her life. Last month, Busch received one of two Courage Awards at the 48th annual Scholar Athlete Awards Dinner for overcoming personal challenges on and off the field.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann, The Baltimore Sun | November 10, 2010
The midshipman put his mark on his Rawlings Primo right-handed baseball glove, embroidering his name onto the thumb. A U.S. Naval Academy classmate wrote the number "5" and a reference to religious scripture — Philippians 4:13 — on the pinky of his Rawlings Pro Preferred. The person who authorities believe stole the gloves and hawked them on eBay didn't try to obscure the tell-tale markings, and that made it easy for undercover agents with the Naval Criminal Investigative Service to hop on the Internet auction site and buy back the gloves.
SPORTS
March 10, 2009
1 Familiar faces: Look in the stands at the Orioles-Red Sox exhibition game (1 p.m., MASN), and you might see some of the same Boston fans who come to Camden Yards. 2 Shining moments: Tonight's conference finals are connected, sort of: the Summit (8, ESPN2), Horizon (9, ESPN) and Sun Belt (10, ESPN2). 3 Sour notes: The Capitals are skidding a bit, but they're in Nashville (8 p.m., Comcast SportsNet), so someone can write a sad song about it if they lose again. 4 Run carefully: Three World Baseball Classic games are on TV (5 p.m., ESPN2; 6:30 and 10 p.m., MLB Network)
NEWS
By NICK SHIELDS and NICK SHIELDS,SUN REPORTER | March 19, 2006
About 8 a.m. yesterday, Lisa Magness learned from a TV news report that the Baltimore Orioles had scheduled tryouts for ballboys and ballgirls in an hour. She and her father, John, scoured their home for a baseball glove. By 9:15 a.m., they were in the visitors' dugout at Camden Yards. Magness, 21, of Severna Park was one of only 11 people who braved the crisp morning winds for the tryouts. Heather Bressler, in-game entertainment coordinator for the Orioles, said 75 people showed up two years ago for tryouts.
NEWS
By Andrew Ratner | October 4, 2001
HOW MY collection began I'm not quite sure. A miniature copy of Cal Ripken's bat, including his signature on the barrel, about the size of your pinky. A toy bus that plays part of the speech he gave the night he broke Lou Gehrig's record when you push down its front wheels. A lamp switch that resembles a Wheaties box with Cal's picture on it. Why I began accumulating this stuff I'm not sure either. I've always been a bit of a pack rat. Part of me figured the stuff might have value someday, like the ads and trinkets from the 1920s and '30s bearing Babe Ruth's image that are displayed at his birthplace museum in Baltimore's Ridgely's Delight.
FEATURES
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 15, 1999
Thanks to technology and a retired baseball coach with an engineering degree, kids have a new way to answer one of life's most pressing questions: How fast can they throw a baseball?The coach, Albert E. Dilz, 68, has created a tiny radar device that attaches to the back of a baseball glove and measures the velocity of an incoming ball. Dilz, of Cincinnati, calls his invention Glove Radar and plans to start selling it for $79.95.Glove Radar will sell for less than half the price of radar guns.
SPORTS
By Katherine Dunn, The Baltimore Sun | April 27, 2011
Santina Busch started playing softball after she found a glove when she was 8. Since then, she has played three sports, including 12 varsity seasons at Patapsco. In her senior year, she has been the captain of the soccer, basketball and softball teams. For Busch, however, sports have played such a pivotal role that she says they changed her life. Last month, Busch received one of two Courage Awards at the 48th annual Scholar Athlete Awards Dinner for overcoming personal challenges on and off the field.
SPORTS
By Tribune newspapers | June 10, 2011
Last December, Bobby Wilson married a woman he met in 2004 while playing minor league baseball in Cedar Rapids, Iowa. But the Angels' reserve catcher readily admits she was not his first love. Wilson wistfully recalled that his first soul mate had a nice tan, leathery skin and a musky scent he found intoxicating. The two were inseparable for five years. And his wife isn't even jealous. That's because the object of Wilson's affection was a Rawlings infielder's mitt he got when he was 5 years old. "I don't think that glove left my side for five years," says Wilson, 28. "I carried it to school with me. As soon as we got home, we played baseball until dinner.
NEWS
By Joyce S. Brown | June 30, 1995
For all the history of griefAn empty doorway anda maple leaf.--MacleishFor all the history of love,a boy's hand waving$ in a baseball glove.on the side of a truck,two foot letters in fadedorange,startle me at the stop light.Evangelism on wheels, likebloodand books and meals? Then Iseethe smaller print: GuaranteedOvernight Delivery. Ah --the world is fallen indeed,for even summer sun's rising,though probable, can't beguaranteed,nor human breath, when# night delivers day.
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | April 11, 1992
I was in the middle of getting the air out of the house water pipes, when one of my kids wanted me to play catch with him in the alley.Getting the air hammer or "bang" out of the pipes turned out to be pretty easy. I shut the main water feed off, then opened one cold water faucet on the third floor, the highest point in our house. Next I turned on another faucet in the basement sink, the lowest point in our plumbing system. This drained all the water out of the pipes. Finally I closed both faucets, and turned the main water feed back on. It worked.
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