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By TOM DUNKEL and TOM DUNKEL,SUN REPORTER | April 3, 2006
No one is going to write a Broadway musical titled "Damn Ravens!" Something about the sport of baseball lends itself to song. Strains of "Take Me Out to the Ball Game" were regularly echoing in parks as early as 1910. The up-down ritual of the seventh-inning stretch, an interlude seemingly tailor-made for sing-alongs, was cemented in fans' psyches by the Roaring Twenties. Today, in this era of Jumbotron and MTV, ballparks rock from batting practice till final out. Spectators abhor a vacuum - and silence.
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SPORTS
By Don Markus and The Baltimore Sun | October 1, 2014
Frank Fried was born a few months before the Orioles won their last World Series, so the 31-year-old mechanical engineer's memories of his favorite baseball team are mostly painful. Like many fans, Fried believes that the drought will end this month, a result that would not only thrill the city but also boost the local economy. A partial season-ticket holder, Fried will be at Camden Yards for Thursday's Game 1 of the American League Division Series against the Detroit Tigers, as he was nearly three dozen times during a regular season when the Orioles were one of the best teams in baseball.
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NEWS
By James H. Bready | April 3, 1992
AL KERMISCH, gazing out across the baseball diamonds of long ago, has made a discovery. He's made it as he sits there staring into a microfilm screen at the Library of Congress. The discovery is like a beer vendor's making a sale at an Oriole home game: It keeps happening.But this one stands out. It's the worst slaughter ever.In the history of baseball, particularly as played professionally in Baltimore and Washington, Al Kermisch has been everywhere. He has inspected the box score of every game ever played by the teams, major league and minor, of both cities.
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | September 12, 2014
For reporters, writing online must seem like admission to heaven. No space limits, no damn copy editor ruthlessly cutting forty lines of burnished prose to make it fit the page. Little interference from an editor, or even, bless us and save us, no editor at all .  Unfortunately, the online writer falls victim to the same fallacy entertained by the print writer: Because it's published , people read my stuff.* A couple of days ago, Craig Schmidt, formerly of the Star-Ledger , posted this comment on Facebook to the link to my post "Wait, wait, don't hang all the editors" : "What we've really lost -- especially online -- is making every word count.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and The Baltimore Sun | October 1, 2014
Frank Fried was born a few months before the Orioles won their last World Series, so the 31-year-old mechanical engineer's memories of his favorite baseball team are mostly painful. Like many fans, Fried believes that the drought will end this month, a result that would not only thrill the city but also boost the local economy. A partial season-ticket holder, Fried will be at Camden Yards for Thursday's Game 1 of the American League Division Series against the Detroit Tigers, as he was nearly three dozen times during a regular season when the Orioles were one of the best teams in baseball.
BUSINESS
By Jeff Barker, The Baltimore Sun | August 4, 2014
It already has a famous name, but Ripken Baseball says it is looking for a naming-rights sponsor for Ripken Stadium, home of the minor-league Aberdeen IronBirds. The family name of Orioles Hall of Famer Cal Ripken Jr. would not disappear from the 6,300-seat stadium. Rather, it would be paired with that of a new business partner. "We're looking to take the iconic Ripken name and partner with another iconic, established brand," said Colin Clark, vice president of brand marketing for Ripken Baseball, which Ripken chairs.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Peter Schmuck, The Baltimore Sun | March 18, 2013
Another day, another inquiring mind wanting to know what it's like to be baseball's next big thing. Manny Machado is ushered into the large conference room at the Orioles' Ed Smith Stadium training complex, his attention quickly drawn to the portraits on the far wall. Brooks Robinson. Frank Robinson. Boog Powell. Cal Ripken. All in a row. "Someday," he says almost sheepishly, "I want to be up on that wall. " Someday, he probably will, but first things first. There is the small matter of living up to the advance billing and Machado instinctively knows that he won't be able to do that if he takes his eye off the ball.
SPORTS
By Jamison Hensley and Jamison Hensley,Contributing Writer | May 14, 1995
Many young athletes don't believe they have to stretch before playing baseball.Baseball doesn't require constant running like basketball or soccer. It doesn't include the physical play of such sports as football or lacrosse.Young players spend their time before their soccer and football games in a formal pre-game workout with teammates. Young players spend their time before baseball games mainly playing catch while chattering with a buddy.And besides the pitcher and catcher, the rest of the team spends its time waiting to catch a fly ball or sitting until a turn at the plate.
NEWS
August 20, 1992
The Hamburg Street bridge will remain closed during Oriole baseball games -- despite an appeal from the South Baltimore business community that the bridge be reopened in midgame.City transportation officials say a month-long traffic study determined that opening the bridge during games presented too great a hazard to pedestrians.Since Oriole Park at Camden Yards opened in April, the bridge stays closed from two hours before the game until traffic clears after the game to accommodate baseball fans walking to and from the stadium.
SPORTS
By Kevin Van Valkenburg and Kevin Van Valkenburg,SUN STAFF | April 19, 2003
For Navy football coach Paul Johnson, spring practice has been a welcome opportunity to tweak and tinker with an offense that last season - when it didn't turn the ball over - wasn't that bad. For defensive coordinator Buddy Green, retooling the defense this spring has been nothing short of a complete restoration project. "We aren't anywhere close to where we need to be," said Green earlier this week. "We are moving a lot of guys around, taking a look at a lot of young faces. We are hoping individuals get better at certain positions, whether we've moved them [somewhere]
BUSINESS
By Jeff Barker, The Baltimore Sun | August 4, 2014
It already has a famous name, but Ripken Baseball says it is looking for a naming-rights sponsor for Ripken Stadium, home of the minor-league Aberdeen IronBirds. The family name of Orioles Hall of Famer Cal Ripken Jr. would not disappear from the 6,300-seat stadium. Rather, it would be paired with that of a new business partner. "We're looking to take the iconic Ripken name and partner with another iconic, established brand," said Colin Clark, vice president of brand marketing for Ripken Baseball, which Ripken chairs.
SPORTS
By Jon Meoli and The Baltimore Sun | June 9, 2014
I'm taking the Coffee Companion, where I recap the day and weekend's sports headlines, on the road today. I'm in Charlottesville, Va,. for Maryland's NCAA super regional in accommodations that provide neither coffee nor complimentary shampoo, and yet I'm still willing to deliver this summary goodness for you all this morning. I'm a modern-day Karl Malone if you ask me. - Manny Machado drew the ire of the baseball world Sunday when he knocked Oakland catcher Derek Norris out of the game when he hit him with a couple bat swings, then lost his grip on his bat after a couple inside pitches.
NEWS
By Elizabeth Heubeck | June 2, 2014
Parents of child athletes, take this quiz: Does your child receive lessons from a professional, paid coach in addition to a team coach? Do you routinely travel more than 30 minutes, one way, to your child's sporting events? Does your child's sport schedule conflict with other family commitments? If you answered yes to any of the questions above, chances are your family has also been ensnared in the sport-centric web that's now so much a part of childhood. I know mine has. It's tough to pinpoint how it happens or who is to blame.
NEWS
By Cal Thomas | March 15, 2014
Every year we are subjected to lists. Forbe's magazine lists the world's wealthiest individuals. Time magazine lists the most "influential" people, though real influence is difficult to define or quantify. What I've never seen is a list of satisfied people, much less stories about how they attained satisfaction. Arianna Huffington is trying to fill that gap. One of the world's biggest Type A personalities, Huffington, who launched The Huffington Post in 2005 and whose picture appears alongside celebrities, politicians and business icons, is now asking a question popularized in an old song by the late Peggy Lee: "Is that all there is?"
SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina and The Baltimore Sun | September 15, 2013
After seeing starting pitcher Miguel Gonzalez limp off the field with a right groin strain in the sixth inning Sunday afternoon, the Orioles were able to finally grind out a win fitting of a playoff contender with their 3-1 victory over the Toronto Blue Jays at the Rogers Centre.   The Orioles -- held without a hit after the fourth inning -- overcame several obstacles in front of an announced 22,331, receiving 3 2/3 scoreless innings from their bullpen and holding an early lead created by the game's only hit in 17 combined at-bats with runners in scoring position between the two teams.
SPORTS
By Dan Connolly and The Baltimore Sun | August 20, 2013
Welcome back to the bar. Sorry we hadn't been open for a while, but I figured most of Baltimore needed a shot -- or 15 -- after Monday's 4-3 loss to the Tampa Bay Rays. Pull up a barstool and try not to weep into the peanuts. I'll pour you a stiff drink. I'd make it a double, but there might be someone on base. Yes, Monday was a particularly fist-pounding loss for the Orioles. And it was fairly typical these days. They knocked out 15 hits and chased one of baseball's best pitchers, David Price, after five innings.
SPORTS
By Dan Connolly and The Baltimore Sun | August 20, 2013
Welcome back to the bar. Sorry we hadn't been open for a while, but I figured most of Baltimore needed a shot -- or 15 -- after Monday's 4-3 loss to the Tampa Bay Rays. Pull up a barstool and try not to weep into the peanuts. I'll pour you a stiff drink. I'd make it a double, but there might be someone on base. Yes, Monday was a particularly fist-pounding loss for the Orioles. And it was fairly typical these days. They knocked out 15 hits and chased one of baseball's best pitchers, David Price, after five innings.
SPORTS
By Milton Kent | December 7, 1999
As proof that money can salve even the most substantial hurt feelings, Major League Baseball and ESPN put aside their squabbling over Sunday night baseball telecasts and announced the settlement of a lawsuit filed by ESPN.The two parties reached agreement on a new six-year deal to run through 2005 that the Associated Press reports is worth $800 million. It will boost the number of hours of coverage on ESPN channels from about 500 to more than 800 annually, with a new package of Wednesday games, select Sunday games and a Sunday highlight show, "Baseball 2Day," on ESPN2.
SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina and The Baltimore Sun | August 13, 2013
PHOENIX -   The Orioles' night ended Monday with Arizona Diamondbacks left fielder Adam Eaton hitting a ball into the swimming pool in right-center at Chase Field then and running into a pile of teammates at home plate. On a night in which two teams chasing playoff spots traded five ties or lead changes in the final 2 ½ innings, the Orioles fell just short in a 7-6, walk-off series-opening loss in the desert. The Orioles, who made baseball history by going 29-9 in one-run games on their way to the playoffs last season, are 14-19 in contests decided by one-run this season, including 4-12 on the road.
SPORTS
By Ryan Hood, The Baltimore Sun | July 25, 2013
Growing up, Terrence Turner-Blair wasn't like the other kids. While others wanted to be the next Kobe Bryant or Peyton Manning, he wanted to be the next Barry Bonds or Ken Griffey Jr. At this weekend's Big 26 Baseball Classic in Harrisburg, Pa., Turner-Blair again won't be like the other kids. Sure, the 52 high school baseball players from Maryland and Pennsylvania taking the field for the three-game series are all pursuing baseball careers. But Turner-Blair (Northwestern) is the only participant from Baltimore.
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