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SPORTS
November 22, 2010
Great player, better guy Peter Schmuck Baltimore Sun There is a lot people don't know about Stan "The Man" Musial because he spent his entire amazing career out of the national media spotlight. He was the most prolific hitter of his era in the National League, he was a champion of racial justice in baseball and he played for the St. Louis Cardinals, which meant he was never going to have the same big-city appeal as Mickey Mantle or some of the other greats from the middle of the 20th Century.
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NEWS
October 4, 2010
Before Baltimore becomes swept up entirely in Ravens football (as impossible as that may be given the first place team's comeback win against the dread Steelers on the road), a tip of the cap is due Buck Showalter and the Orioles. A baseball season that started out as an epic disaster in the making turned into something not so embarrassing after all. We knew of Mr. Showalter's legendary turnaround skills before he took over the team this summer. He worked baseball magic in New York, Texas and Arizona.
NEWS
September 6, 2010
Through thin and thin Phil Rogers Chicago Tribune Every night you'll hear a local broadcaster praise his audience for being "the best fans in baseball. " From New York to both sides of Chicago, in Los Angeles, St. Louis and even places like Detroit and Houston, the distinction is thrown around cheaply. But the fans who truly deserve the distinction are the ones who still show up at PNC Park in Pittsburgh. The Pirates are on pace to finish 54-108, their 18th consecutive losing season and second-worst in franchise history, yet they still average 20,070, more than the Marlins, Athletics and Indians.
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck , peter.schmuck@baltsun.com | December 9, 2009
NDIANAPOLIS - - INobody cares about baseball anymore. That's why ESPN spent the entire day Tuesday doing incremental updates on the slow-developing three-team deal that will put - if you want to just hit the high notes - Curtis Granderson in the New York Yankees' outfield and Edwin Jackson in the Arizona Diamondbacks' rotation. I know, Granderson and Jackson are real good players, and the five other guys involved make it a very big deal, but it's not like any of them are dating Kate Hudson.
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck | December 9, 2009
Nobody cares about baseball anymore. That's why ESPN spent the entire day Tuesday doing incremental updates on the slow-developing three-team deal that will put - if you want to just hit the high notes - Curtis Granderson in the New York Yankees' outfield and Edwin Jackson in the Arizona Diamondbacks' rotation. I know, Granderson and Jackson are real good players, and the five other guys involved make it a very big deal, but it's not like any of them are dating Kate Hudson. Nobody cares about the Orioles anymore.
NEWS
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,michael.sragow@baltsun.com | May 15, 2009
Sugar is a near-great movie with qualities more unusual than some all-time classics. It resists cliche at every turn and puts something solid in its place: raw yet controlled observation that gives the film the form of a flexing muscle. The writing-directing team of Anna Boden and Ryan Fleck tell the fresh, enlivening story of a baseball player, Miguel "Sugar" Santos (Algenis Perez Soto), who progresses from a Dominican Republic training camp to spring training in Arizona and then to Single-A ball in Bridgetown, Iowa.
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck | April 12, 2009
News item: The Maryland Senate has given preliminary approval to a bill that would authorize the state to acquire the rights to the Preakness and Maryland's two major horse racing facilities by eminent domain or in a bankruptcy auction. My take: This is the logical end to the tragic bungling of the slots issue by the legislature. Great, let's use taxpayer-backed bonds to buy the failing horse racing industry right after making Pimlico Race Course and Laurel Park economically inviable under the poorly conceived slots plan that is five years and about $2 billion late to the budget-balancing party.
SPORTS
By DAVID STEELE and DAVID STEELE,david.steele@baltsun.com | February 16, 2009
Pitchers and catchers are reporting, which means it's time once again to ask how much longer fans plan to put up with what baseball is doing with performance-enhancing drugs. Maybe this is the year, and this is the moment, they stop, with Alex Rodriguez's failed drug test stinking up spring training. But if last year wasn't it - after the Mitchell Report, after the Roger Clemens circus, after Barry Bonds' numbers still taunted everybody even as he was being blackballed from the game - then it will never happen.
SPORTS
By PETER SCHMUCK | October 9, 2008
In an SI.com story, Barry Bonds says he has had fun during his first full season out of baseball and is enjoying his freedom from the game. Barry, of course, might have to enjoy his freedom while he can. He's still awaiting trial on 14 counts of making false statements to a grand jury and one count of obstruction of justice. I also think, by and large, baseball fans have enjoyed their freedom from him. (For more, go to baltimoresun.com/schmuckblog)
NEWS
By kevin.cowherd and kevin.cowherd,kevin.cowherd@baltsun.com | August 24, 2008
Whenever things are going too well and I need a dose of misery to level off, I walk down to Camden Yards and stare at the big new hotel next door that is supposed to save this city. Sometimes I have to check the urge to bang on the lobby glass and scream: "You heartless thugs, look what you did to my ballpark!" But it's too late for that now. The thing is up and running - the ribbon-cutting was Friday, the swells are checking in - and all they'd do is call security and run me off. Or they'd have me arrested, and then you have the whole issue of calling home for bail money, which never goes over well.
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