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SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck | December 9, 2009
Nobody cares about baseball anymore. That's why ESPN spent the entire day Tuesday doing incremental updates on the slow-developing three-team deal that will put - if you want to just hit the high notes - Curtis Granderson in the New York Yankees' outfield and Edwin Jackson in the Arizona Diamondbacks' rotation. I know, Granderson and Jackson are real good players, and the five other guys involved make it a very big deal, but it's not like any of them are dating Kate Hudson. Nobody cares about the Orioles anymore.
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NEWS
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,michael.sragow@baltsun.com | May 15, 2009
Sugar is a near-great movie with qualities more unusual than some all-time classics. It resists cliche at every turn and puts something solid in its place: raw yet controlled observation that gives the film the form of a flexing muscle. The writing-directing team of Anna Boden and Ryan Fleck tell the fresh, enlivening story of a baseball player, Miguel "Sugar" Santos (Algenis Perez Soto), who progresses from a Dominican Republic training camp to spring training in Arizona and then to Single-A ball in Bridgetown, Iowa.
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck | April 12, 2009
News item: The Maryland Senate has given preliminary approval to a bill that would authorize the state to acquire the rights to the Preakness and Maryland's two major horse racing facilities by eminent domain or in a bankruptcy auction. My take: This is the logical end to the tragic bungling of the slots issue by the legislature. Great, let's use taxpayer-backed bonds to buy the failing horse racing industry right after making Pimlico Race Course and Laurel Park economically inviable under the poorly conceived slots plan that is five years and about $2 billion late to the budget-balancing party.
SPORTS
By DAVID STEELE and DAVID STEELE,david.steele@baltsun.com | February 16, 2009
Pitchers and catchers are reporting, which means it's time once again to ask how much longer fans plan to put up with what baseball is doing with performance-enhancing drugs. Maybe this is the year, and this is the moment, they stop, with Alex Rodriguez's failed drug test stinking up spring training. But if last year wasn't it - after the Mitchell Report, after the Roger Clemens circus, after Barry Bonds' numbers still taunted everybody even as he was being blackballed from the game - then it will never happen.
SPORTS
By PETER SCHMUCK | October 9, 2008
In an SI.com story, Barry Bonds says he has had fun during his first full season out of baseball and is enjoying his freedom from the game. Barry, of course, might have to enjoy his freedom while he can. He's still awaiting trial on 14 counts of making false statements to a grand jury and one count of obstruction of justice. I also think, by and large, baseball fans have enjoyed their freedom from him. (For more, go to baltimoresun.com/schmuckblog)
NEWS
By kevin.cowherd and kevin.cowherd,kevin.cowherd@baltsun.com | August 24, 2008
Whenever things are going too well and I need a dose of misery to level off, I walk down to Camden Yards and stare at the big new hotel next door that is supposed to save this city. Sometimes I have to check the urge to bang on the lobby glass and scream: "You heartless thugs, look what you did to my ballpark!" But it's too late for that now. The thing is up and running - the ribbon-cutting was Friday, the swells are checking in - and all they'd do is call security and run me off. Or they'd have me arrested, and then you have the whole issue of calling home for bail money, which never goes over well.
SPORTS
By BILL ORDINE | August 13, 2008
Baltimore baseball fans have an internal clock that normally tells them to shut it down by this time of the summer and turn their rooting interest to the Ravens and the NFL. A decade of losing seasons at Camden Yards has had its effect, though the 2008 Orioles have done a better job of holding fans' attention. But there's certainly no postseason in the offing. However, before you pack away the diamond dreams for the season, you might want to check in on the Maryland representatives in the Little League World Series.
SPORTS
By PETER SCHMUCK | July 15, 2008
First, a confession: There was a time when I thought the All-Star Home Run Derby was a great idea. The thought of bringing the best power hitters together for a batting practice slugfest summoned memories of the old black-and-white Home Run Derby television show (even though I'm really not old enough to remember 1959) and unquestionably captured the imagination of baseball fans when the All-Star version debuted in 1985 at the Metrodome in Minneapolis. It made perfect sense. Fans - and not just the chicks - loved the long ball, and home runs still were coming in reasonable numbers in the mid-1980s.
BUSINESS
By Eric Benderoff and Eric Benderoff,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | July 10, 2008
Most of us don't have the time to sit in front of the TV to enjoy each inning our favorite baseball team plays. That doesn't mean you can't keep up with the score. These days, updated scores are as close as your mobile phone, but what if you could get a score while eating dinner with the family? Or while putting a puzzle together with the kids? All you need to do is glance at the nearby desk or bookshelf where you put Liveboard, a gadget that does one thing: keep score. If you've ever gotten the evil eye from the wife when you say, "Hold on for a sec while I check the score," then Liveboard is for you. (Apologies to the wives who get such glares from their husbands; some of my most treasured memories are shivering with Mom on Opening Day.)
NEWS
By Childs Walker and Childs Walker,Sun reporter | December 15, 2007
Baseball is no stranger to scandal and unsavory history. One of its earliest superstars, Cap Anson, perpetuated a culture of fierce segregation that scarred the game for decades. Another early great, "Shoeless Joe" Jackson, was one of eight Chicago White Sox who agreed with gamblers to take a dive in the 1919 World Series. All-time hit leader Pete Rose can't enter the Hall of Fame because he bet on the sport. Some of the biggest stars of the 1980s became embroiled in cocaine trials. The 1994 World Series was lost to labor strife.
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