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ENTERTAINMENT
By Jill Rosen, The Baltimore Sun | April 8, 2011
If you run into Walt Wagner, don't be surprised if he tells you right away, that his son — HIS SON!! — is one of two guys Major League Baseball is paying — PAYING!! — to hole up and watch every last inning of every last ball game. His boy, born in Baltimore and raised on the Orioles, beat out 10,000 people for the chance to "eat, sleep and live baseball" for the entire season — albeit behind glass in a Manhattan storefront. "I still get the shakes when I talk about it," gushes Wagner, a retired city cop. "That's my son. " Ryan Wagner, who's 25, is spending the next seven months with fellow winner Mike O'Hara, lazing on a sofa, sipping Budweisers and fixing his attention on what will turn out to be 2,430 games — a head-spinning number of pitches, countless fly balls, who knows how many stolen bases.
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SPORTS
By Matt Vensel | March 29, 2011
Most Orioles fans don't need a study to know that things have gotten pretty depressing in Birdland after 13 straight seasons of losing baseball. But in case you've had your head in a paper bag all these years, I'll pass along the findings of a recent study. Avvo.com, a website that gives out medical and legal advice , claims that Baltimore is the third most depressed baseball city in America behind Washington and Oakland. According to a press release, Avvo "evaluated the cities that are home to the 18 MLB teams that haven't won a World Series in the past 20 years, and also looked at the teams' on-field performance.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | February 6, 2011
Fans of all ages headed to Mercy Medical Center on Sunday for a rare opportunity to hold the bat used by baseball legend and Baltimore native Babe Ruth during his historic season in 1927, when he set the single-season home run record. Partnering with Mercy Medical Center, the Babe Ruth Birthplace Foundation and Museum offered fans the opportunity to hold a piece of sports history to commemorate Ruth's Feb. 6 birthday. He would have been 116 years old. In the first public display of the record-setting bat — which has been kept in the private archives of the Babe Ruth museum — baseball fans put on protective gloves and struck their most exemplary batting poses, emulating the cutout of Ruth that served as a backdrop for souvenir photographs that fans could have taken for a $10 donation to Mercy's neonatal intensive care unit.
SPORTS
November 22, 2010
Great player, better guy Peter Schmuck Baltimore Sun There is a lot people don't know about Stan "The Man" Musial because he spent his entire amazing career out of the national media spotlight. He was the most prolific hitter of his era in the National League, he was a champion of racial justice in baseball and he played for the St. Louis Cardinals, which meant he was never going to have the same big-city appeal as Mickey Mantle or some of the other greats from the middle of the 20th Century.
NEWS
October 4, 2010
Before Baltimore becomes swept up entirely in Ravens football (as impossible as that may be given the first place team's comeback win against the dread Steelers on the road), a tip of the cap is due Buck Showalter and the Orioles. A baseball season that started out as an epic disaster in the making turned into something not so embarrassing after all. We knew of Mr. Showalter's legendary turnaround skills before he took over the team this summer. He worked baseball magic in New York, Texas and Arizona.
NEWS
September 6, 2010
Through thin and thin Phil Rogers Chicago Tribune Every night you'll hear a local broadcaster praise his audience for being "the best fans in baseball. " From New York to both sides of Chicago, in Los Angeles, St. Louis and even places like Detroit and Houston, the distinction is thrown around cheaply. But the fans who truly deserve the distinction are the ones who still show up at PNC Park in Pittsburgh. The Pirates are on pace to finish 54-108, their 18th consecutive losing season and second-worst in franchise history, yet they still average 20,070, more than the Marlins, Athletics and Indians.
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck , peter.schmuck@baltsun.com | December 9, 2009
NDIANAPOLIS - - INobody cares about baseball anymore. That's why ESPN spent the entire day Tuesday doing incremental updates on the slow-developing three-team deal that will put - if you want to just hit the high notes - Curtis Granderson in the New York Yankees' outfield and Edwin Jackson in the Arizona Diamondbacks' rotation. I know, Granderson and Jackson are real good players, and the five other guys involved make it a very big deal, but it's not like any of them are dating Kate Hudson.
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck | December 9, 2009
Nobody cares about baseball anymore. That's why ESPN spent the entire day Tuesday doing incremental updates on the slow-developing three-team deal that will put - if you want to just hit the high notes - Curtis Granderson in the New York Yankees' outfield and Edwin Jackson in the Arizona Diamondbacks' rotation. I know, Granderson and Jackson are real good players, and the five other guys involved make it a very big deal, but it's not like any of them are dating Kate Hudson. Nobody cares about the Orioles anymore.
NEWS
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,michael.sragow@baltsun.com | May 15, 2009
Sugar is a near-great movie with qualities more unusual than some all-time classics. It resists cliche at every turn and puts something solid in its place: raw yet controlled observation that gives the film the form of a flexing muscle. The writing-directing team of Anna Boden and Ryan Fleck tell the fresh, enlivening story of a baseball player, Miguel "Sugar" Santos (Algenis Perez Soto), who progresses from a Dominican Republic training camp to spring training in Arizona and then to Single-A ball in Bridgetown, Iowa.
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck | April 12, 2009
News item: The Maryland Senate has given preliminary approval to a bill that would authorize the state to acquire the rights to the Preakness and Maryland's two major horse racing facilities by eminent domain or in a bankruptcy auction. My take: This is the logical end to the tragic bungling of the slots issue by the legislature. Great, let's use taxpayer-backed bonds to buy the failing horse racing industry right after making Pimlico Race Course and Laurel Park economically inviable under the poorly conceived slots plan that is five years and about $2 billion late to the budget-balancing party.
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