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NEWS
By Michael Cross-Barnet | October 20, 2012
"The Orioles will finish fifth in the American League East. Only because they can't finish sixth. " - Grant Brisbee, baseball blogger, writing in SB Nation on April 5, 2012 Midafternoon on Thursday, Sept. 6, I got off the No. 11 bus near Light and Pratt streets, adjusted my orange and white cap, and followed a small but growing crowd to Oriole Park at Camden Yards . When I got there, the place was buzzing. Long lines of the faithful waited to get inside for the unveiling of a statue honoring one of their heroes, Cal Ripken Jr. , 17 years to the day since he broke Lou Gehrig's record for consecutive games played.
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SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina and The Baltimore Sun | October 13, 2012
Most of the Orioles had already cleaned out their lockers at Camden Yards by Saturday afternoon, when just a few stragglers were tossing their possessions into cardboard boxes to mark the symbolic end to baseball in Baltimore this season. Outside, a few dozen fans still lingered for one final sight of their favorite players. Executive vice president Dan Duquette stopped by to sign autographs. The Orioles had a remarkable turnaround in 2012 - going from 93 losses in 2011 to 93 wins in the regular season, then falling just one win short of playing for the American League title - but the finality had hit manager Buck Showalter.
SPORTS
Kevin Cowherd | October 9, 2012
Orioles fans, take a bow. You deserve it. That was some show you put on at Camden Yards the past two nights. I've never seen anything like it. And I've been around sports in this town for a long time. For two wonderful nights in October, you showed the entire country this could still be a great baseball town, no matter how big the Ravens are. For two nights, in the kind of dreary weather that makes London look like a terrific place, you filled the Orioles' jewel of a downtown ballpark, twirling your orange-and-white rally towels and making enough noise to shake the place - literally.
NEWS
October 4, 2012
No sport carries more superstition than baseball. Whether it's really the mistreatment of a goat that has doomed the Chicago Cubs or the sale of Babe Ruth's contract that forced Boston into decades of World Series exile is irrelevant. Fans know it might be true, and that's enough. Thus, we are going to acknowledge that Friday is very big day for Baltimore baseball fans, but we are not going to name the team or the players involved. Not that it isn't a great name with a proud tradition, and not that we don't have every confidence that the professional baseball team in question is going to win tomorrow night, but why take the chance?
SPORTS
Peter Schmuck | September 4, 2012
Let's try to put this in proper perspective. The last time the Orioles were in first place in September, your college freshman was just starting to walk with any degree of confidence, your phone wasn't smarter than you and "Seinfeld" was entering its farewell season. It has been 15 years since the Orioles were on top of the American League East this late, so you can be forgiven if you don't want to let go of the strange and wonderful feeling that engulfed you on Tuesday night. That's when the Tampa Bay Rays defeated the first-place Yankees and the Orioles hammered the Toronto Blue Jays to move into a tie with the Yankees for the top spot in the division.
SPORTS
Peter Schmuck | August 25, 2012
It's no secret why new Orioles Hall of Famer Mike Mussina evokes mixed feelings from the baseball fans of the Baltimore area. He is a controversial figure in Orioles history - the guy who left here in the prime of his career to pitch for the rival Yankees  and, some might say, left the Orioles to wallow in defeat and despair for the next decade. He is also the guy who played a very pivotal role on the last Orioles team that made this city proud and the pitcher who ranks third on the club's all-time win list.
SPORTS
By Mike Klingaman, The Baltimore Sun | June 24, 2012
June 25, 1997: For the second time in 27 days, the Orioles' Mike Mussina (9-2) flirts with a no-hitter before surrendering an eighth-inning single in a 9-1 victory over the Milwaukee Brewers. Earlier, in a 3-0 win over the Cleveland Indians, he had carried a perfect-game bid into the ninth before allowing a hit. "I took a run at it. It didn't happen, again," Mussina said afterward. "Maybe I'll get another chance. " June 26, 1978: The Orioles set a record for futility with a 24-10 loss at Toronto.
SPORTS
By Mike Klingaman, The Baltimore Sun | May 11, 2012
There's the Hall of Fame plaque, the World Series ring and the hardware he won for Rookie of the Year, Most Valuable Player (twice) and countless other accomplishments. Sometimes, Cal Ripken Jr. looks at that stuff and wonders: Is it really mine? "The farther removed [from playing] that I get, the more it all seems like another lifetime. But I'm pretty sure it all happened to me," said Ripken, 51, who spent 21 seasons with the Orioles before retiring in 2001. "When you're not playing baseball, day to day, in many ways your career is like looking back on a dream.
SPORTS
By Dan Connolly and The Baltimore Sun | May 9, 2012
Here are a couple thoughts on Josh Hamilton's four-home run night against the Orioles - only the 16 th in major league baseball history, the first at Camden Yards and only the second in Baltimore. The other was at Memorial Stadium on June 10, 1959, when Rocky Colavito of the Cleveland Indians did it. After Hamilton reached the milestone - a blast to center on a 0-2 pitch from Darren O'Day - the Orioles fans reacted appropriately. I know he is on the opposing team, but it was fantastic to see the fans - there were only 11,263 of you, so I don't want to see 20,000 stories next year about how all of you were there - jump to their feet and applaud this guy. And when Hamilton went out to the outfield after the eighth, he received another ovation - that apparently was especially cool for the Raleigh, N.C., native, who says he gets “worn out” by heckling Orioles fans, presumably about his well-publicized battle against addictions.
SPORTS
Peter Schmuck | May 9, 2012
Making history is becoming a habit during the 2012 baseball season. We're little more than a month into it, and we've seen both a perfect game and one so imperfect that it ended with two position players as the pitchers of record Sunday in Boston. So why should anyone be surprised that Texas Rangers center fielder Josh Hamilton slammed four home runs Tuesday night at Oriole Park to etch his name into the record books? Hamilton, whose story of drug addiction and redemption is the stuff of sermons and script writers, hit two home runs off Orioles starter Jake Arrieta, one off newly arrived reliever Zach Phillips and one off sidearmer Darren O'Day to become the 16th player in major league history to go deep four times in a game and only the second to do it against the Orioles.
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