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NEWS
September 6, 2010
Through thin and thin Phil Rogers Chicago Tribune Every night you'll hear a local broadcaster praise his audience for being "the best fans in baseball. " From New York to both sides of Chicago, in Los Angeles, St. Louis and even places like Detroit and Houston, the distinction is thrown around cheaply. But the fans who truly deserve the distinction are the ones who still show up at PNC Park in Pittsburgh. The Pirates are on pace to finish 54-108, their 18th consecutive losing season and second-worst in franchise history, yet they still average 20,070, more than the Marlins, Athletics and Indians.
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SPORTS
By Jon Meoli and The Baltimore Sun | October 7, 2014
Davey Johnson was the last Orioles manager to lead the team to the ALCS, and he managed four other clubs, including most recently the Washington Nationals. He seemed to pick Baltimore over his most recent stop in an MLB Network Radio interview this morning. Johnson was asked about seeing baseball revived in Baltimore, and said it's “wonderful” to see. “I think the best fans in baseball are right around that Baltimore area,” Johnson said. “Now we're getting baseball fans in Washington, which has mostly been a football town, but I love the people in that area.
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NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | December 28, 2011
Talk baseball with Washington native David Paulson for a few minutes, and his obsessive lifelong fandom pours out in facts, figures and lore. He recalls how he loved the most obscure of Washington Senators players, like outfielder Stan Spence. How he admired third baseman Cecil Travis less for his career average (.314) than his combat service in World War II. And how he got to see Frank Howard, a soft-hearted, 300-pound slugger from Ohio, hit 34 homers a year for the hometown team even as they cemented their reputation as one of baseball's perennial doormats.
NEWS
September 17, 2014
Not long ago, it was suggested by more than one sportswriter that the Baltimore Orioles would never again win the American League East. Not merely because they were bad (although during the post-1997 cellar-dwelling years, they certainly were) but because the checkbook-advantaged franchises in New York and Boston had too great an advantage in the age of free agency. So that raucous celebration by players and fans alike Tuesday evening at Camden Yards after the Orioles clinched the division with an 8-2 victory over the Toronto Blue Jays was understandable and well-deserved.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | February 6, 2011
Fans of all ages headed to Mercy Medical Center on Sunday for a rare opportunity to hold the bat used by baseball legend and Baltimore native Babe Ruth during his historic season in 1927, when he set the single-season home run record. Partnering with Mercy Medical Center, the Babe Ruth Birthplace Foundation and Museum offered fans the opportunity to hold a piece of sports history to commemorate Ruth's Feb. 6 birthday. He would have been 116 years old. In the first public display of the record-setting bat — which has been kept in the private archives of the Babe Ruth museum — baseball fans put on protective gloves and struck their most exemplary batting poses, emulating the cutout of Ruth that served as a backdrop for souvenir photographs that fans could have taken for a $10 donation to Mercy's neonatal intensive care unit.
SPORTS
By BILL TANTON | August 1, 1995
Here in Baltimore, you can hardly tell what's really happening in baseball.At Camden Yards, the crowds once again are at or near capacity. With Bobby Bonilla now in harness, Orioles fans have wild card fever.But even here there are telltale signs of trouble."We went to the game the other night," a friend was telling me yesterday, "and it's no problem getting tickets now from scalpers. Good tickets. Sometimes for less than face value."A year ago we'd go down there and pay $20 or $30 for a $15 ticket.
SPORTS
By Mark Hyman | February 11, 1992
The Orioles and the state's Department of Economic and Employment Development are inviting fans to a day of baseball on June 6. Actually, a day and a night.Yesterday, team and DEED officials formally announced "Maryland Marathon Baseball Day," an unusual statewide tour that will take fans to three professional baseball games throughout the state in a frenzied, tightly scheduled 24 hours.On the baseball tour, fans will see two Orioles' minor-league teams in action before winding up at Oriole Park at Camden Yards.
FEATURES
By Michael Hill | October 4, 1991
After baseball fans spend Sunday afternoon saying goodbye to Memorial Stadium, they can spend Sunday evening with another of Baltimore's contributions to our national pastime -- Babe Ruth.NBC is saying goodbye to baseball's regular season -- and to male viewers for a while, to cater to non-baseball fans for the rest of the month while post-season play dominates CBS' prime time -- with "Babe Ruth," which will air Sunday night at 9 o'clock on Channel 2 (WMAR).This is a movie for baseball fans, not for movie fans.
NEWS
By MIKE ROYKO | April 7, 1995
Because of the long strike, many baseball fans could have trouble communicating because their special language skills have grown rusty.A fan can't just plunk himself down on a bar stool and say something like: "Tell me, do you think that the Cubs are capable of winning enough baseball games this season to be considered worthy competitors or be awarded a divisional title?"There would be snickering or suspicious stares because that is not the proper way to talk baseball.Those fans who want to brush up on their baseball talk are advised to tune in to "Sports Yak Yak," the most popular round-the-clock sports radio call-in show.
NEWS
By Melody Simmons and Melody Simmons,Evening Sun Staff | November 29, 1990
Baseball fans who are disabled will find seating designed for them throughout the new Camden Yards stadium, Maryland Stadium Authority officials said.Disabled fans -- the wheelchair-bound, deaf and blind -- can purchase tickets for 428 seats. The seats are scattered throughout the new stadium's main concourse, upper deck and the exclusive club level of the 47,000-seat ballpark under construction near the Inner Harbor.The seats for the disabled can be folded aside to make way for wheelchairs or be used as regular seats.
NEWS
By Mark Puente, The Baltimore Sun | August 30, 2014
Usually awash with Orioles and Ravens fans, South Paca Street became a sea of scarlet and gray Saturday afternoon. Hundreds of Ohio State University fans filled Pickles Pub, Sliders Bar & Grille and The Bullpen to celebrate after the fifth-ranked Buckeyes beat the Navy Midshipmen at M&T Bank Stadium. Many of the 57,579 fans who left the stadium about 3:30 p.m. headed to bars as others tossed footballs and drank cold drinks in the parking lots. Hundreds of others streamed toward the newly opened Horseshoe Casino Baltimore.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 8, 2014
Matthew T. Kellermann, a computer systems analyst and lifelong baseball fan, died Aug. 1 of a heart attack at his Ellicott City home. He was 53. The son of John L. "Jack" Kellermann, an American Telephone & Telegraph worker, and Ruth Bopp Kellermann, Matthew Thomas Kellermann was born in Baltimore and spent his early years in the West Hills neighborhood before moving in 1972 with his family to the Allenford neighborhood of Ellicott City. A 1979 graduate of Mount Hebron High School, where he was an outstanding varsity pitcher, he studied for two years at the Community College of Baltimore County's Catonsville campus.
SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina, The Baltimore Sun | June 16, 2014
ST. PETERSBURG, Fla.  - While growing up in San Diego, Orioles center fielder Adam Jones idolized Tony Gwynn as a player, then later gained greater admiration for him after getting to know the Padres Hall of Famer as a person. So the news of Gwynn's death Monday at age 54, after a four-year battle with cancer, hit Jones especially hard. "I've known the man for most of my adult life, so it's tough when someone passes like that, especially the impact he'd had on not just myself, but on countless major leaguers, and just people in general, in the San Diego community," Jones said.
SPORTS
By Childs Walker and The Baltimore Sun | June 16, 2014
Cal Ripken Jr. and Tony Gwynn always will be linked by a splendid Sunday in July 2007, when baseball fans massed to celebrate all that was still good in the game. The pair went into the Hall of Fame together - Gwynn, the voluble hitting wizard, and Ripken, the indestructible shortstop. They seemed to admire each other as much as the crowd appreciated them both. So Ripken reacted with sadness Monday when news emerged that Gwynn had died at age 54 after an extended battle with cancer . “This is an extraordinarily sad day,” Ripken said in a statement.
SPORTS
By Alejandro Zuniga and The Baltimore Sun | June 4, 2014
A collection of what other media outlets are saying about the Orioles. * ESPN's Richard Durrett reflected on Nelson Cruz's return to Texas, the team for which he played for eight years. The designated hitter-outfielder hit his major league-leading 21st home run on Tuesday night, and Durrett wrote that Cruz hasn't lost his flair for the spectacular . It seems that everything with Cruz is big. Big swings. Big misses. Big streaks. Big home runs in big moments. The home run, not to mention Cruz's presence in an orange and black uniform, had some Rangers fans thinking it had been a big mistake not to re-sign him. But Cruz doesn't think about the "what if" or live in that past.
FEATURES
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | April 14, 2014
The Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual and Transgender Community Center of Baltimore is organizing to bring LGBT baseball fans together at Oriole Park at Camden Yards this summer. "Baltimore is a town that really comes together in the name of its sports teams. Whether you identify within the LGBT spectrum or not, we can all agree that when it comes down to it, we're all rooting for the same team," said Kelly Neel, the GLCCB's deputy executive director, in a statement. "This summer we are hoping to expand on that sense of unity by bringing LGBT Oriole's Outings to Camden Yards.
SPORTS
By Jeff Barker and Jeff Barker,Sun Reporter | March 27, 2007
WASHINGTON -- Sen. John Kerry plans to say at a Senate hearing today that the system that should allow fans easy access to televised baseball games from multiple markets "is not working." In a statement to be delivered to the Senate Commerce Committee, the Massachusetts Democrat expressed reservations about a $700 million deal that could make Major League Baseball's Extra Innings package - which allows fans to watch out-of-market games - the exclusive property of the DirecTV satellite service.
SPORTS
By PETER SCHMUCK | July 9, 2006
If you're a truly committed baseball fan - or just a baseball fan who truly needs to be committed - you've probably spent a lot of time thinking about the most appropriate way to honor your favorite team when you head off to that big ESPN Zone in the sky. So I don't have to tell you that your options have been severely limited by the lack of officially licensed funeral merchandise bearing the logo of your most cherished major league franchise. Not anymore. Thanks to a recent licensing agreement between Major League Baseball and a company called Eternal Images, obsessing about your mortality just became a lot more fun ... and carrying your fanatical allegiance to the Orioles or some other major league club officially into eternity just became a whole lot easier.
NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | March 31, 2014
Two hours before Chris Tillman's first pitch, as the sun poured healing rays onto Eutaw Street and thousands of orange-and-black-clad fans flooded toward the turnstiles, a man in a Brooks Robinson jersey leaned against the No. 5 Hall of Fame sculpture in front of Camden Yards. Fred Crouse of Parkville, 53, was waiting for his wife and daughter. He'd been so eager to get to the ballpark for Opening Day 2014, he'd taken off running, leaving them far behind. "I was mad to get here for the buzz," said Crouse, a lifelong Orioles fan, raising his voice in a brisk wind Monday before the 2-1 victory over the Boston Red Sox. "Just look at this place.
SPORTS
Peter Schmuck | July 4, 2013
There was a time not so long ago when it was pretty easy for baseball fans to handicap the pennant races and predict which division winners and wild-card teams would make it into the postseason. All you had to do was follow the money. The New York Yankees and Boston Red Sox were almost automatic. The dirt-cheap Tampa Bay Rays were the most glaring exception, but the playoffs were largely populated with the teams carrying the biggest payrolls. It was not a counterintuitive equation, of course, in the only major American professional sports league without a salary cap. The notion that money can buy you anything - love, happiness, a World Series trophy - is as American as apple pie, but something is happening in 2013 that defies all economic and competitive logic.
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