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By Peter Schmuck and The Baltimore Sun | August 14, 2014
Orioles principal owner Peter G. Angelos was the first baseball executive to speak publicly about the election of Rob Manfred as Major League Baseball's 10th commissioner Thursday evening at the Hyatt Regency in Baltimore. “Long day, but worthwhile," he said. “I think the owners elected a very confident, strong, strong leader, and I think he's going to make some real difference in the future, and he can build on the accomplishments of the previous administration.” Angelos confirmed that the owners got stuck on 22 of the 23 votes necessary to reach the super-majority necessary to elect Manfred, but ge said that always was going to be the outcome.
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By Peter Schmuck and The Baltimore Sun | August 14, 2014
Orioles principal owner Peter G. Angelos was the first baseball executive to speak publicly about the election of Rob Manfred as Major League Baseball's 10th commissioner Thursday evening at the Hyatt Regency in Baltimore. “Long day, but worthwhile," he said. “I think the owners elected a very confident, strong, strong leader, and I think he's going to make some real difference in the future, and he can build on the accomplishments of the previous administration.” Angelos confirmed that the owners got stuck on 22 of the 23 votes necessary to reach the super-majority necessary to elect Manfred, but ge said that always was going to be the outcome.
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By Peter Schmuck and The Baltimore Sun | August 6, 2014
Major league owners will convene in Baltimore next week for their quarterly meeting, and they are expected to elect a new commissioner to replace Bud Selig, who will retire in January after presiding over the sport in both an interim and permanent capacity for more than 22 years. The two-day meeting will take place Wednesday and Thursday at the downtown Hyatt Regency and, according to a Major League Baseball source, is not expected to venture far afield from the choice of the new commissioner, who will be selected from a field of finalists that include MLB chief operating officer Rob Manfred, MLB executive vice president of business Tim Brosnan and Boston Red Sox chairman Tom Werner.
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By Peter Schmuck, The Baltimore Sun | August 14, 2014
The final vote did not come easy, but Major League Baseball chief operating officer Robert D. Manfred finally achieved the necessary super-majority early Thursday night to become the the 10th commissioner of baseball. Manfred, who helped steer the sport through its most volatile labor period and has been a pivotal figure in the game's war on performance-enhancing drugs, was considered the heavy favorite to succeed Allan H. "Bud" Selig when the selection process entered its final stage during the two-day quarterly owners meeting at the Baltimore Hyatt Regency.
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By Eduardo A. Encina and The Baltimore Sun | July 15, 2014
Baseball commissioner Bud Selig told a group of reporters Tuesday in Minneapolis that he believes there will be a resolution in the ongoing dispute between the Orioles and the Washington Nationals over Mid-Atlantic Sports Network television rights by the time he leaves office. Over the past few years, the same question has been posed to Selig, but in his annual All-Star Game media session with members of the Baseball Writers' Association of America on Tuesday afternoon, he gave his first indication that a solution could be on the horizon.
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By Peter Schmuck, The Baltimore Sun | August 14, 2014
The final vote did not come easy, but Major League Baseball chief operating officer Robert D. Manfred finally achieved the necessary super-majority early Thursday night to become the the 10th commissioner of baseball. Manfred, who helped steer the sport through its most volatile labor period and has been a pivotal figure in the game's war on performance-enhancing drugs, was considered the heavy favorite to succeed Allan H. "Bud" Selig when the selection process entered its final stage during the two-day quarterly owners meeting at the Baltimore Hyatt Regency.
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By Dan Connolly, The Baltimore Sun | August 12, 2014
Baseball commissioner Bud Selig contends that the Mid-Atlantic Sports Network television rights dispute between the Orioles and the Washington Nationals can be resolved before he leaves office in January and that both Baltimore and Washington, D.C., are viable candidates to host an All-Star Game in the near future. Perhaps more important for Orioles fans, Selig said the two issues are not connected - that there is no consideration in holding the All-Star Game hostage from either franchise if the MASN legal entanglement continues.
NEWS
September 9, 1992
THE hubbub over Fay Vincent, commissioner of baseball, who resigned at the request of 18 of the 28 major league team owners, could have been avoided if a proposal we heard the other day had been enacted.The proposal: Have the American people elect the commissioner in the quadrennial presidential elections.It's the "national pastime," after all, so why shouldn't the nation have a say in who runs the game? Besides, having an election for baseball commissioner will bring out the vote.Most of the Joe (and quite a few of the Jane)
NEWS
September 10, 1992
The forced resignation of Fay Vincent as baseball commissioner is a skirmish in a longer battle. Every commissioner except the legendary Kennesaw Mountain Landis, who pioneered the position in the wake of the Black Sox scandal of 1919, and A. Bartlett Giamatti, who died after just five months in office, has struggled with the sport's owners over the powers of the office. One way or another, they all lost. Though Mr. Vincent cast his initial refusal to resign in the face of a no-confidence vote last week as a defense of the commissioner's power to act in the best interests of baseball, the issue may be narrower than that.
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By THEO LIPPMAN JR | December 28, 1992
SOME TEXANS want Gov. Ann Richards to send herself to the Senate when Lloyd Bentsen resigns to become secretary of the Treasury.Governor Richards can't take this seriously. She must know the history of such self-promotions. Nine times in the past, governors have, in effect, appointed themselves to the Senate, and eight times they have then been defeated when they ran for election to the office.The one exception was A.B. "Happy" Chandler, whose name I left out of last Monday's column about senators who resigned to take higher office.
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By Dan Connolly, The Baltimore Sun | August 12, 2014
Baseball commissioner Bud Selig contends that the Mid-Atlantic Sports Network television rights dispute between the Orioles and the Washington Nationals can be resolved before he leaves office in January and that both Baltimore and Washington, D.C., are viable candidates to host an All-Star Game in the near future. Perhaps more important for Orioles fans, Selig said the two issues are not connected - that there is no consideration in holding the All-Star Game hostage from either franchise if the MASN legal entanglement continues.
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By Peter Schmuck and The Baltimore Sun | August 6, 2014
Major league owners will convene in Baltimore next week for their quarterly meeting, and they are expected to elect a new commissioner to replace Bud Selig, who will retire in January after presiding over the sport in both an interim and permanent capacity for more than 22 years. The two-day meeting will take place Wednesday and Thursday at the downtown Hyatt Regency and, according to a Major League Baseball source, is not expected to venture far afield from the choice of the new commissioner, who will be selected from a field of finalists that include MLB chief operating officer Rob Manfred, MLB executive vice president of business Tim Brosnan and Boston Red Sox chairman Tom Werner.
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By Peter Schmuck, The Baltimore Sun | July 29, 2014
The long-simmering television rights dispute between the Mid-Atlantic Sports Network and the Washington Nationals appears close to reaching a boil. The Nationals have contended since 2012 that they are entitled to a much higher annual rights fee for their television broadcasts than they are currently receiving from MASN, the network that is largely owned by the Orioles. And the stalemate reportedly has prompted baseball commissioner Bud Selig to exert pressure on both sides to reach an equitable settlement.
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By Eduardo A. Encina and The Baltimore Sun | July 15, 2014
Baseball commissioner Bud Selig told a group of reporters Tuesday in Minneapolis that he believes there will be a resolution in the ongoing dispute between the Orioles and the Washington Nationals over Mid-Atlantic Sports Network television rights by the time he leaves office. Over the past few years, the same question has been posed to Selig, but in his annual All-Star Game media session with members of the Baseball Writers' Association of America on Tuesday afternoon, he gave his first indication that a solution could be on the horizon.
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Peter Schmuck | January 13, 2014
There wasn't much in Sunday night's "60 Minutes" report on baseball's Alex Rodriguez investigation that could truly shock anyone at this point in the sport's tawdry PED era. Everyone knows that anabolic steroids and other sophisticated performance-enhancing substances have been rampant in baseball for decades. The thing that was most revealing about the interview with Biogenesis snake oil salesman Anthony Bosch and the documentary evidence presented was the lengths that athletes will go to gain some advantage over the competition and the lengths that Major League Baseball was willing to go -- in this case -- to build a case against one of the most celebrated of the alleged steroid offenders.
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By Peter Schmuck, The Baltimore Sun | March 31, 2012
Clearly, brick and steel age more gracefully than the rest of us, because Oriole Park is about to celebrate its 20th birthday on Opening Day Friday and who can believe it is already the 10th-oldest ballpark in the major leagues? Time does fly, in this case seemingly faster than an Adam Jones line drive or a Jake Arrieta heater. The stadium that changed the way stadiums are built was an instant classic. Now, it's simply the grande dame of the post-modern era of sports architecture, but its continuing impact on both baseball and Baltimore cannot be overestimated.
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By New York Times News Service | April 13, 1994
NEW YORK -- In removing himself from consideration for the U.S. Supreme Court, Sen. George Mitchell put himself into position yesterday to be named the next baseball commissioner.Baseball officials would not say that Mitchell was their man for the job, which has been unfilled the last 19 months. But people familiar with their thinking said they were prepared to move quickly to get him before someone else did.Mitchell, D-Maine, who announced last month that he would not seek re-election, has not said that he would accept the job of commissioner if it were offered.
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By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 18, 1998
The search for a baseball commissioner is over. It did not stray an inch from where it began.Bud Selig, who has served in the role of commissioner for nearly six years without having the title, has decided to accept the job he had resisted taking, several people in ownership and high-ranking positions in Major League Baseball said yesterday.Two people, one a high-ranking official in baseball and one who is not in baseball but has close contacts with people in the sport's hierarchy, said an announcement could be made by the All-Star Game, which is July 7. An owner said it could be forthcoming in two to four weeks.
SPORTS
January 13, 2008
Getting rid of Brian Billick? Let us count the whys Since Brian Billick was fired as Ravens coach, I have read and heard many comments by sportswriters and fans that owner Steve Bisciotti made a mistake. The reasons varied, but the fact that Billick won a Super Bowl and had a winning record were always part of their rationale. Those facts notwithstanding, here are reasons why Billick had to be fired: Terrible play-calling Horrendous time management Nonexistent team discipline Excessive number of penalties An offense that has been the laughingstock of the NFL for years He lost the respect of many veteran players The only mistake Bisciotti made was giving Billick a four-year contract.
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By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck,SUN COLUMNIST | July 13, 2005
DETROIT - Baseball commissioner Bud Selig would love to use the sweeping powers of his office to rid the sport of performance-enhancing drugs ... if only his powers were as sweeping as some people would like to believe. Selig has asked the Major League Baseball Players Association to join him in adopting a much tougher steroid-testing program than the one that currently appears to be working just fine, because the fact that it seems to be working is only half the battle. "I believe this is an integrity issue," Selig said yesterday.
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