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By Chris Kaltenbach and Baltimore Sun reporter | August 6, 2010
When Don Berkus set up his first baseball card convention 41 years ago, a few dozen collectors gathered inside a Los Angeles hotel room at 10 a.m. and within an hour had spent pretty much all the money they had. This weekend, the National Sports Collectors Convention he started 10 years later is holding court at the Baltimore Convention Center through Sunday, and Berkus expects upward of 35,000 people to show up. Times change, Berkus admits....
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NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | September 17, 2013
He leans forward at the desk in his cluttered study, fanning out three baseball cards like a man unveiling the winning hand in a poker game. The faces are in black and white, the subjects in bow ties and upturned mustaches. The names - Gleason, Hemming, Reitz - would mean little to most modern fans. Yet the players belonged to perhaps the greatest team in local baseball history, the cards to a set so rare that owning them changed Dan McKee's life. He sold them for six figures in 2006, earning enough on the deal to purchase his family's dream home in northern Baltimore County.
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NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | September 17, 2013
He leans forward at the desk in his cluttered study, fanning out three baseball cards like a man unveiling the winning hand in a poker game. The faces are in black and white, the subjects in bow ties and upturned mustaches. The names - Gleason, Hemming, Reitz - would mean little to most modern fans. Yet the players belonged to perhaps the greatest team in local baseball history, the cards to a set so rare that owning them changed Dan McKee's life. He sold them for six figures in 2006, earning enough on the deal to purchase his family's dream home in northern Baltimore County.
NEWS
August 27, 2013
Aberdeen Donald F. Kunesch, 28, of the 500 block of South Law Street, was charged Friday with being a fugitive from Massachusetts justice. Anthony D. Stanley, 54, of the first block of Osborn Road, was charged Friday with failing to appear in court for a case in which he was charged with loitering. Gary Osborne, 24, of the 400 block of Ruby Drive, was charged Friday with failing to appear in court for a case in which he was charged with possessing marijuana. Christopher Thomas Smith, 35, of the first block of Forest Green Road, was charged Saturday with second-degree assault.
SPORTS
By Everett Cook | August 3, 2012
In the Orioles Banquet Room overlooking Camden Yards on Thursday night, $566,132 was exchanged for 37 baseball cards that a family almost threw out with the garbage in March. The cards were part of the so-called “Black Swamp Find,” named after the area in Defiance, Ohio where the cards were found by the Hench family. The family was cleaning out the house of an aunt who had recently passed away when they got to the attic, full of relics from the turn of century. The hidden treasure of 1910 E-98 cards was found in a non-descript box underneath a dollhouse, but weren't recognized as valuable because of how small they were in comparison to modern day cards.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | January 24, 1997
The bulldozer was coming over the hill, so before it was too late, Mr. Joseph Marion Townsley decided to take a little peek inside the abandoned farmhouse. This was 30 years ago, up in Harford County, and the story can now be told. Townsley lived near the old house and, with the bulldozer on the way to raze it, curiosity pushed him through the door. He didn't find much -- just a bunch of old baseball cards, about 50 of them, on the floor. Townsley gathered three or four of them up, took them home and packed them in a briefcase.
NEWS
By TaNoah V. Sterling and TaNoah V. Sterling,SUN STAFF | March 28, 1996
County police arrested one of their own officers yesterday on charges of shoplifting baseball cards from the Glen Burnie Wal-Mart while he was on duty and in uniform.Officer David Heline, 32, was charged with theft and released on his own recognizance. The 11-year veteran, who works in the Western District, was suspended with pay and placed on administrative duties pending the outcome of the case, police said.Administrative charges also are pending against him.Management at the store in the 7900 block of S. Crain Highway told police March 4 they were suspicious that a uniformed officer had been shoplifting.
SPORTS
By Ruth Sadler and Ruth Sadler,Sun Staff Writer | February 27, 1994
Spring training has started, and card collectors' thoughts might be turning to baseball.One of their tools is a price guide, often a thick book listing players from No. 1 to infinity in every set. Alphabetized guides help locate individual players' cards.Paul M. Green takes a different approach in "The Complete Price Guide to Baseball Cards Worth Collecting" (Contemporary Books, $8.95).Green, a contributor to Sports Collectors Digest and Baseball Cards, leaves out the commons. He has a section of Hall of Famers and "key players," listing some of their important (or expensive)
SPORTS
By Ruth Sadler | December 2, 1990
It's December. The weather has turned cold. National Football League teams are jockeying for playoff position. Holiday shopping is getting down to crunch time.And the 1991 baseball season is here.Actually, most of the '91 baseball cards are expected at dealers this month.The season looks like an exciting one.Topps will be celebrating its 40th anniversary in baseball cards. The cards, available late in the month, will carry a special anniversary logo in the upper left corner. The photos are eye-catching, and team logos are incorporated in the design to make an attractive card.
SPORTS
By Jay Apperson and Jay Apperson,Sun Staff Writer | March 31, 1994
Hank Foiles, a journeyman catcher who played in 43 games for the 1961 Baltimore Orioles, has filed a $7 million, class-action lawsuit seeking compensation from the team for using his likeness in a set of promotional baseball cards.Foiles, 64 and living in Norfolk, Va., contends that he and about 450 other former Orioles are owed money because they were depicted, without their permission, in a 1991 series of baseball cards featuring every player in the team's modern history. The cards were given away at selected Orioles games and were sold at area Crown gasoline stations.
NEWS
March 22, 2013
NO PURCHASE NECESSARY TO ENTER OR WIN. A PURCHASE WILL NOT INCREASE YOUR CHANCES OF WINNING. The Baseball Card Giveaway Sweepstakes ("Sweepstakes") starts at noon (ET) on March 25, 2013 and ends at 12 p.m. (ET) on April 8, 2013 ("Sweepstakes Period"). This Sweepstakes shall be subject to these Official Rules, and by entering, each entrant agrees to abide and be bound by these rules and the decisions of the judges and Sponsor. 1) Eligibility: This Sweepstakes is open to legal U.S. residents residing in Maryland, the District of Columbia, or York County, Pennsylvania who are 21 years and older as of the first day of the Sweepstakes Period.
SPORTS
By Zach Helfand and The Baltimore Sun | August 4, 2012
The price tags came in different shapes and sizes - plain and colorful, stuck on items and hanging off, bigger for sums surpassing $4 million and small enough for a few bucks - and they were everywhere. They were stuck to baseball cards, hung off used jerseys and sat in front of championship rings. One announced the price of the Olympics Torch from Atlanta. Another, Hulk Hogan's championship belt. Some price tags were on the Internet. For $300, you could buy a ticket to have Ricky Henderson sign your artwork or jersey.
SPORTS
By Everett Cook | August 3, 2012
In the Orioles Banquet Room overlooking Camden Yards on Thursday night, $566,132 was exchanged for 37 baseball cards that a family almost threw out with the garbage in March. The cards were part of the so-called “Black Swamp Find,” named after the area in Defiance, Ohio where the cards were found by the Hench family. The family was cleaning out the house of an aunt who had recently passed away when they got to the attic, full of relics from the turn of century. The hidden treasure of 1910 E-98 cards was found in a non-descript box underneath a dollhouse, but weren't recognized as valuable because of how small they were in comparison to modern day cards.
SPORTS
By Kevin Cowherd, The Baltimore Sun | July 31, 2012
It was like something out of a Hollywood movie - a musty attic in a stately old home, a forlorn-looking dollhouse perched against one wall and underneath it, a mysterious dust-covered box wrapped in twine. But what Karl Kissner and his cousin, Karla Hench, stumbled upon on that gray February day was a real-life bonanza of about 700 baseball cards from the early 1900s with a total estimated value of about $3 million, according to some experts. "Some people discover art in their attic, others discover natural gas on their property," said Chris Ivy of Heritage Auctions in Dallas, which bills itself as the world's largest collectible auctioneer.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | July 17, 2012
Baltimore-inspired restaurant named Lake Trout is set to open Wednesday on Havemeyer Street in Brooklyn , N.Y.  The star of the menu is an iconic Baltimore sandwich, and the walls are decorated with enlargements of 70s-era Orioles, Colts and Bullets playing cards. Not surprisingly, one of the collaborators in the 14-seat restaurant is a native Baltimorean, Matt Lang, who has made a name for himself in the New York food world. He was the grillmaster at Fette Sau BBQ and was the winner on the Food Network 's "Best of Smoke" show.
SPORTS
By Dan Connolly, The Baltimore Sun | July 11, 2011
Orioles catcher Matt Wieters has always been obsessed with sports. He made baseball cards of the U.S. presidents for a fourth grade history project. He traded his Nintendo video game system, the Christmas gift he had to have, for a golf club. His dad, a former minor league pitcher, taught Wieters to switch-hit about the time the toddler could pick up a plastic bat. So it was a big day in the Wieters' household when the 4-year-old could finally play on a recreational soccer team.
SPORTS
By Ruth Sadler | July 7, 1991
Alan Rosen, the well-heeled dealer known as "Mr. Mint," has written a book on baseball cards.But be forewarned about "Mr. Mint's Insider's Guide to Investing in Baseball Cards and Collectibles" (with Doug Garr, Warner Books, 183 pages, $9.95). It's not quite what the title suggests.First, intermediate and advanced collectors should not be put off by the title. He does not treat non-investing collectors patronizingly. And there is sound advice for collectors, even if they shudder at the idea of collections being considered investments.
SPORTS
By Ruth Sadler | October 23, 1990
If you're somewhere from thirtysomething to fiftysomething, you probably did baseball cards until you discovered Mad magazine -- around the age of 12.In those days, the vocabulary of cards was limited to "got 'im/don't got 'im." You opened your card pack, sorted the cards quickly into two piles, swapped the duplicates (or clipped one to the rear of your bike with a clothespin) and put the new ones in your collection, in rubber-banded piles in a shoe box. Cards of favorite players found their way into pockets or were thumbtacked to a place of honor on the wall or bulletin board.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach and Baltimore Sun reporter | August 6, 2010
When Don Berkus set up his first baseball card convention 41 years ago, a few dozen collectors gathered inside a Los Angeles hotel room at 10 a.m. and within an hour had spent pretty much all the money they had. This weekend, the National Sports Collectors Convention he started 10 years later is holding court at the Baltimore Convention Center through Sunday, and Berkus expects upward of 35,000 people to show up. Times change, Berkus admits....
SPORTS
By Kevin Cowherd, The Baltimore Sun | June 29, 2010
Well, that didn't take long. Less than 24 hours after The Baltimore Sun published a story about the Babe Ruth Birthplace and Museum's year-long search for the owner of a rare and valuable baseball card, the owner has surfaced. A man identifying himself as Glenn Davis of Bethany Beach, Del., contacted the museum -- and the newspaper -- Tuesday to say he was the owner of the 1914 Baltimore News Babe Ruth rookie card. It's one of the most valuable cards on the market, with an estimated value of $500,000.
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