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Base Closings

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NEWS
By Evansville (Ind.) Courier | June 6, 1991
ROOTING out of public life all conceivable appearance of conflict of interest is sometimes a needless distraction from getting things done. But James Courter got it right the other day when he canceled his consulting contract with a major defense company.Courter is a key figure in the long-running struggle to closemilitary bases. . . .Closing bases is such a sensitive issue that members of $H Congress in 1988 created the Defense Base Closure and Realignment Commission to take politics out of the closing process.
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NEWS
By Phillip McGowan and Phillip McGowan,SUN STAFF | August 25, 2005
ARLINGTON, Va. - A federal commission approved yesterday Pentagon plans that would bring thousands of high-paying jobs to Maryland, but displayed an independent streak by sparing two historic New England military installations slated for closure under the national realignment proposal. Aberdeen Proving Ground would gain more than 2,200 jobs after the Base Closure and Realignment Commission approved the closing of Fort Monmouth in New Jersey. The panel also approved moving media and defense information operations to Fort Meade, a group that makes up the bulk of the more than 5,300 jobs that the Pentagon had recommended to go to the Army post in Anne Arundel County.
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NEWS
March 5, 1995
Once again it is time for those who want to shrink the federal government and reduce its budget to face the consequences.Pentagon officials have selected another 146 military bases -- five in Maryland -- for closure because they are no longer needed in a downsized, post-Cold-War military force. Predictably, the scramble has started to convince an independent commission, which has the all-but-final word on base closings, to shut down the other guy's bases.Maryland has fared well in prior base-closing decisions in the past seven years.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 14, 2005
WASHINGTON - A majority of the members of the independent commission assessing the Pentagon's proposed list of domestic base closings says that the Defense Department probably overstated the nearly $50 billion in savings projected over 20 years - nearly half of which could amount to pay for personnel simply moving from one base to another. In interviews last week with six of the nine members, they expressed varying degrees of concern about the accuracy of the Pentagon figures and said they had directed the commission's staff to conduct a separate savings analysis before the commission's final votes on the military's recommendations this month.
NEWS
March 6, 1995
The scramble is on to save five Maryland military facilities slated for closure in the Pentagon's fourth and latest round of base reductions.Immediately after the Pentagon revealed that Maryland facilities were on its hit list, Gov. Parris Glendening and the state's congressional delegation vowed to fight to save them, arguing that these bases are "different" from the hundreds of other surplus installations around the country.While the state cannot afford to ignore the possible loss of 1,000 civilian jobs, the truth is that until now, Maryland has been lucky.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | April 2, 1998
WASHINGTON -- Pressing Congress to agree to politically painful cuts, Defense Secretary William S. Cohen will argue today that two new rounds of base closings are needed to avoid cutbacks in weapons systems and programs for military personnel.Cohen, at a news conference, will be upping the ante with lawmakers. Last year, Congress rejected his call for base closings in 1999 and 2001 and instead asked for a report on the Pentagon's excess bases and the savings of four previous rounds of closings.
NEWS
By Melissa Harris and Melissa Harris,SUN STAFF | May 22, 2005
Like many federal workers driving from the Baltimore suburbs into Washington every day, Marshall Hudson picks his poison - the Beltway, New York Avenue or Massachusetts Avenue - based on the 7:15 a.m. radio traffic report. On a good day, he gets to the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency in an hour - a dream commute compared with the one he would have if the Pentagon closes his office in Bethesda and moves it to Fort Belvoir, Va., as part of a nationwide shuffling and consolidating of military resources.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | August 3, 2001
WASHINGTON - The Pentagon wants Congress to approve a fresh round of base closings in 2003, conceding that the politically painful proposal will be difficult to sell on Capitol Hill because it usually means lost military jobs and reduced federal spending in local communities. "We have too much capacity. We have to do something about it," said Pete Aldrich, the undersecretary of defense for acquisitions, insisting that savings from closing or consolidating facilities would free up billions of dollars each year that could be spent on military personnel and weapons systems.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | March 22, 2001
WASHINGTON - Again there is talk in Washington of closing military bases, the kind of talk that scares Harford County Executive James M. Harkins and other officials who fear the job-rich facilities in their communities will face the budget ax. "It sends chills down my spine," said Harkins. "It sends shock waves through the business community." Harkins is worried about one possible target, Aberdeen Proving Ground, the No. 1 employer in his county, which provides jobs for 15,000 civilian and military personnel, and pumps $520 million a year into Harford's economy.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | April 11, 1991
WASHINGTON -- Secretary of Defense Richard Cheney is preparing to call for the closure of more than 30 major military bases.Fifteen months after Cheney sparked a political firestorm by asking Congress for authority to close or shrink scores of military bases, the defense secretary has prepared a revised list to be presented tomorrow to an independent commission assigned to review the proposals.The base closings and reductions being sought by Cheney are part of an overall strategy to shrink U.S. military forces by about 25 percent over five years to reflect the reduced Soviet threat and tighter federal budgets.
NEWS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,SUN STAFF | July 31, 2005
Harford County, facing one of the greatest influxes of high-technology jobs in the state's history, is teaming up with surrounding jurisdictions to accommodate the predicted economic development boon. Decisions are not final, but Aberdeen Proving Ground stands to lure an estimated 13,000 to 15,000 technology jobs to the area by the middle of the next decade. About 5,000 of those jobs result from the federal Base Realignment and Closure Commission's decision to close New Jersey's Fort Monmouth and shift its civilian operations to APG. Even more jobs, perhaps as many as 8,000 to 10,000, are expected from a Rockville developer's plan to build a 300-acre business and technology park at APG. The developer, Opus East LLC, has laid out plans for a facility that would provide federal agencies, government contractors and private companies the security of being behind the guarded gates of a military base.
NEWS
By Childs Walker and Childs Walker,SUN STAFF | May 24, 2005
Maryland business and government leaders need to be vocal in support of Pentagon plans to realign the nation's military bases to help counter political opposition that will not end until the fall, two area congressmen told a gathering of business owners yesterday. Reps. Benjamin L. Cardin and C.A. Dutch Ruppersberger said the plans - which include bringing about 5,300 new jobs to Fort Meade and 6,600 to the state overall - will face wide challenges from elected officials in states that are losing jobs.
NEWS
By Melissa Harris and Melissa Harris,SUN STAFF | May 22, 2005
Like many federal workers driving from the Baltimore suburbs into Washington every day, Marshall Hudson picks his poison - the Beltway, New York Avenue or Massachusetts Avenue - based on the 7:15 a.m. radio traffic report. On a good day, he gets to the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency in an hour - a dream commute compared with the one he would have if the Pentagon closes his office in Bethesda and moves it to Fort Belvoir, Va., as part of a nationwide shuffling and consolidating of military resources.
NEWS
By John Hendren and John Hendren,LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 17, 2005
WASHINGTON - To thousands of communities, the battle to rescue military bases is a matter of economic life and death. As the Base Realignment and Closure Commission met yesterday for the first time since receiving the Pentagon's list of bases recommended for cutbacks or closing, lobbyists and unpaid activists thronged Capitol Hill in an effort to save bases. The commission is considered unlikely to make major changes. Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld urged commission members yesterday to avoid changing Pentagon recommendations on base closings and adjustments, saying a slight change in one location could affect troops somewhere else.
NEWS
By Stephanie Desmon, Gus G. Sentementes and Gwyneth K. Shaw and Stephanie Desmon, Gus G. Sentementes and Gwyneth K. Shaw,SUN STAFF | May 14, 2005
Maryland would gain more than 6,600 jobs - more than all but one other state - as jobs throughout the country are sent here under a vast restructuring of the nation's military bases proposed yesterday by the Pentagon. The state's big bases would get bigger, namely Fort Meade in Anne Arundel County and Aberdeen Proving Ground in Harford County, both of which are expected to see an influx of thousands of civilian personnel over the coming years. St. Mary's County officials were relieved yesterday to learn their community - home to Patuxent River Naval Air Station and its 20,000 employees - wouldn't lose much of its economic engine, a base that a recent study found generates more revenue for Maryland than the Port of Baltimore.
NEWS
By Josh Mitchell and Josh Mitchell,SUN STAFF | April 26, 2005
Bracing for the announcement of a list of military bases to be closed or reduced, state officials believe that Maryland could come out with a net gain in jobs because of the war on terror. But they fear the Defense Department might close or realign the Indian Head Naval Surface Warfare Center in Charles County, whose functions could be absorbed by a larger facility. "We don't believe that Indian Head is on a closure list, but we're very much concerned about pieces coming and going," said J. Michael Hayes, a retired Marine Corps general who heads the office of military and federal affairs in the state Department of Business and Economic Development.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 20, 2005
WASHINGTON - For the first time in a decade, communities across the country are bracing for a major round of military base closings, and they are mounting aggressive lobbying campaigns to stave off cuts and other changes that some independent experts say could dwarf the previous four rounds combined. Pentagon officials say all 425 domestic bases are under scrutiny as the military looks to squeeze efficiencies and billions of dollars in savings from a Cold War network that has nearly 25 percent more capacity than what the armed services say they need.
NEWS
By Ralph Vartabedian and Ralph Vartabedian,LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 28, 2004
COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo. - The Pentagon is planning a new round of base closings that will create economic trauma nationwide next year, but this city teaming with more than 30,000 service personnel sees potential opportunity in the coming turmoil. Local leaders are lobbying for even more military jobs, expected to come from bases shut down in other states, notably California. The city, for example, just spent $200,000 for a study by a Washington, D.C., defense consulting company that promotes the region as the best place to receive jobs from the Los Angeles Air Force Base.
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