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By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | May 14, 2002
Maurice Jacques Baruch, a retired furniture store owner who helped found a synagogue, died of cancer yesterday at Northwest Hospital Center. The Pikesville resident was 86. Before retiring 19 years ago, he owned and managed Koren's Furniture on Baltimore National Pike near Catonsville. The business had been founded by his father-in-law in the 1940s. Born in the Bronx, N.Y., he was known as Ric. He earned a degree in premedical studies at City College of New York and earned a master's degree in economics from George Washington University.
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NEWS
By NEWHOUSE NEWS SERVICE | April 26, 2007
Why do you think you can go to a Chinese restaurant and get a huge dish of food for eight bucks? Do you think the Chinese have invented a cheaper way of raising chickens?"
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SPORTS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | March 4, 2006
New York -- Senior forward Anthony Fitzgerald scored 10 points and grabbed 25 rebounds to lead Ville Julie to an upset of host Baruch, 86-71, in the first round of the NCAA Division III men's basketball tournament. The Mustangs (19-8) advance to the second round, where they will face William Paterson at Baruch tomorrow night at 7. Junior guard Phillip Williams scored a game-high 20 points for the Mustangs. Senior guard Robi Davidson led the Bearcats (23-6) with 19 points. The turning point came with nine minutes left.
SPORTS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | March 4, 2006
New York -- Senior forward Anthony Fitzgerald scored 10 points and grabbed 25 rebounds to lead Ville Julie to an upset of host Baruch, 86-71, in the first round of the NCAA Division III men's basketball tournament. The Mustangs (19-8) advance to the second round, where they will face William Paterson at Baruch tomorrow night at 7. Junior guard Phillip Williams scored a game-high 20 points for the Mustangs. Senior guard Robi Davidson led the Bearcats (23-6) with 19 points. The turning point came with nine minutes left.
NEWS
By Jason Song and Jason Song,SUN STAFF | October 14, 2003
As David and Naomi Talbott tried to cut through government red tape to bring their newly adopted son from Liberia to Anne Arundel County, they often stared at a photo of young Baruch Chea - full-faced with healthy limbs and a big smile. But when David Talbott flew to Africa to pick up Baruch, he almost didn't recognize him. The boy's face was thin, and he was holding up his pants with one hand. "The smile was the same, though," Talbott added. Two months after The Sun reported on the Talbotts' difficulty in bringing Baruch to the United States, he is now a part of their family - playing soccer, answering the phone, attending fourth grade at nearby Mayo Elementary School.
NEWS
September 17, 1991
Andre Baruch, 83, whose prolonged radio career ranged from broadcasting Brooklyn Dodgers' baseball games to announcing "Your Hit Parade," died Sunday at his home in Beverly Hills, Calif. Long identified as the voice of Lucky Strike cigarettes, one of Mr. Baruch's most enduring stints was as announcer for "Your Hit Parade," a program that much of America awaited eagerly in the 1930s and '40s as it reported in extravagant detail the 10 top-selling songs of the preceding week. Mr. Baruch's distinctive voice also was a key part "The Shadow."
NEWS
By NEWHOUSE NEWS SERVICE | April 26, 2007
Why do you think you can go to a Chinese restaurant and get a huge dish of food for eight bucks? Do you think the Chinese have invented a cheaper way of raising chickens?"
NEWS
By TaNoah Morgan and TaNoah Morgan,SUN STAFF | February 10, 2003
As a rising star in the mid-'90s, RABA Technologies Inc. took the path of many technology startups of the time - quick growth, prestigious awards and a merger with a large, international firm. But as the technology market cooled and the new economy unraveled, RABA has altered course and returned to expansion plans that founder Robert A. Baruch hopes will lead to further growth for his Columbia-based company. Less than a year after buying the company back from a subsidiary of advertising and marketing giant Interpublic Group of Companies Inc., RABA hasn't lost a step.
FEATURES
By Mary Jo Kochakian and Mary Jo Kochakian,The Hartford Courant | July 3, 1993
Poorly handled anger is a deep well of misery -- the source of family unhappiness, a slew of psychopathologies, and violence both in the home and in the streets.The crushing thing is, it doesn't have to be that way.Anger is normal. It's a part of everyone's life. Although there has been plenty of research on what causes anger, how best to handle it and the problems it creates, that information is not common knowledge, or standard practice.Most of us are still responding to anger in the way we saw our parents do it -- and that could include forbidding the expression of it, withdrawal, a lot of yelling, or violence -- none of which promotes emotional well-being.
NEWS
By Jared Taylor | October 28, 1992
IN 1983, black and Hispanic graduates of Baruch College in New York sought official approval for a racially segregated alumni association. They wanted campus office space, secretarial help, and all the other services that were provided to the general alumni association. The president of Baruch refused, saying that such an organization would run counter to his goals of integration.The black and Hispanic group filed suit, saying that the college's refusal was racist. Seven years later, in 1990, the college capitulated, and Baruch now has two alumni associations: one open to all students and the other open only to certain races.
NEWS
By Jason Song and Jason Song,SUN STAFF | October 14, 2003
As David and Naomi Talbott tried to cut through government red tape to bring their newly adopted son from Liberia to Anne Arundel County, they often stared at a photo of young Baruch Chea - full-faced with healthy limbs and a big smile. But when David Talbott flew to Africa to pick up Baruch, he almost didn't recognize him. The boy's face was thin, and he was holding up his pants with one hand. "The smile was the same, though," Talbott added. Two months after The Sun reported on the Talbotts' difficulty in bringing Baruch to the United States, he is now a part of their family - playing soccer, answering the phone, attending fourth grade at nearby Mayo Elementary School.
NEWS
By TaNoah Morgan and TaNoah Morgan,SUN STAFF | February 10, 2003
As a rising star in the mid-'90s, RABA Technologies Inc. took the path of many technology startups of the time - quick growth, prestigious awards and a merger with a large, international firm. But as the technology market cooled and the new economy unraveled, RABA has altered course and returned to expansion plans that founder Robert A. Baruch hopes will lead to further growth for his Columbia-based company. Less than a year after buying the company back from a subsidiary of advertising and marketing giant Interpublic Group of Companies Inc., RABA hasn't lost a step.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | May 14, 2002
Maurice Jacques Baruch, a retired furniture store owner who helped found a synagogue, died of cancer yesterday at Northwest Hospital Center. The Pikesville resident was 86. Before retiring 19 years ago, he owned and managed Koren's Furniture on Baltimore National Pike near Catonsville. The business had been founded by his father-in-law in the 1940s. Born in the Bronx, N.Y., he was known as Ric. He earned a degree in premedical studies at City College of New York and earned a master's degree in economics from George Washington University.
FEATURES
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN TELEVISION WRITER | January 3, 2001
In light of last week's television news weather predictions about the blizzard that never was, The Sun is providing, as a public service, excerpted transcripts from weather reports of truly biblical proportions. First, from WMAR: Male Anchor: "... Coming to us live from the city zoo today is WMAR's own Noah Lewis, who can tell us what lies in the future. Noah?" Forecaster: "Stan, we've got one nasty prophesy for the days ahead. If you look here to this part of the Storm Trak parchment, where the cloud-like hieroglyphs are covering the entire known world, you can see that we're expecting to have as much as 30 to 60 days and nights of rain.
BUSINESS
By Julius Westheimer | March 8, 1996
"MONEY MATTERS" to think about over the weekend:TAX-SAVER: "If you buy a 1-year Treasury bill or CD now, interest becomes 1997 income and not taxable until April 1998." (Straight Talk About Money)For information about new issues of Treasury bills, notes and bonds, call your broker or Baltimore Branch, Federal Reserve, (410) 576-3553.MANAGING MONEY: "Don't invest in your employer's stock through your 401(k) plan. You have enough at risk in the company's future through your job." (Moneypaper, February)
FEATURES
By Mary Jo Kochakian and Mary Jo Kochakian,The Hartford Courant | July 3, 1993
Poorly handled anger is a deep well of misery -- the source of family unhappiness, a slew of psychopathologies, and violence both in the home and in the streets.The crushing thing is, it doesn't have to be that way.Anger is normal. It's a part of everyone's life. Although there has been plenty of research on what causes anger, how best to handle it and the problems it creates, that information is not common knowledge, or standard practice.Most of us are still responding to anger in the way we saw our parents do it -- and that could include forbidding the expression of it, withdrawal, a lot of yelling, or violence -- none of which promotes emotional well-being.
BUSINESS
By Julius Westheimer | August 27, 1992
Propelled by a rising dollar, the Dow Jones average added 14 1/2 points yesterday, closing at 3,246.81.With Hurricane Andrew in the news, we looked back and found that on June 22, 1972, the day Tropical Storm Agnes struck Maryland, the Dow average closed at 950.71. The Dow shows a gain of 2,296 points, or 241 percent, in the 20 years between storms.MARKET WATCH: Quote of the Week: "I don't think there's too much downside, but at the same time there's not too much upside." (Rao Chalasani, chief investment strategist, Kemper Securities)
FEATURES
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN TELEVISION WRITER | January 3, 2001
In light of last week's television news weather predictions about the blizzard that never was, The Sun is providing, as a public service, excerpted transcripts from weather reports of truly biblical proportions. First, from WMAR: Male Anchor: "... Coming to us live from the city zoo today is WMAR's own Noah Lewis, who can tell us what lies in the future. Noah?" Forecaster: "Stan, we've got one nasty prophesy for the days ahead. If you look here to this part of the Storm Trak parchment, where the cloud-like hieroglyphs are covering the entire known world, you can see that we're expecting to have as much as 30 to 60 days and nights of rain.
NEWS
By Jared Taylor | October 28, 1992
IN 1983, black and Hispanic graduates of Baruch College in New York sought official approval for a racially segregated alumni association. They wanted campus office space, secretarial help, and all the other services that were provided to the general alumni association. The president of Baruch refused, saying that such an organization would run counter to his goals of integration.The black and Hispanic group filed suit, saying that the college's refusal was racist. Seven years later, in 1990, the college capitulated, and Baruch now has two alumni associations: one open to all students and the other open only to certain races.
BUSINESS
By Julius Westheimer | August 27, 1992
Propelled by a rising dollar, the Dow Jones average added 14 1/2 points yesterday, closing at 3,246.81.With Hurricane Andrew in the news, we looked back and found that on June 22, 1972, the day Tropical Storm Agnes struck Maryland, the Dow average closed at 950.71. The Dow shows a gain of 2,296 points, or 241 percent, in the 20 years between storms.MARKET WATCH: Quote of the Week: "I don't think there's too much downside, but at the same time there's not too much upside." (Rao Chalasani, chief investment strategist, Kemper Securities)
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