Advertisement
HomeCollectionsBart Simpson
IN THE NEWS

Bart Simpson

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By ROGER SIMON | July 14, 1991
SIMON SAYS:I don't care what anyone says, we didn't have weather like this before they launched the Hubble Space Telescope.*A good vacuum cleaner should last you a lifetime. (If you don't live too long.)*Should we tell our children that if they, too, "experiment" with illegal drugs, they may grow up to be nominated to the Supreme Court?*Even with two new cities getting National League franchises, Baltimore still remains the only city in North America to have major league baseball and no other major league teams.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Laura Cadiz and Laura Cadiz,SUN STAFF | November 1, 2001
Nancy Cartwright's name and face are not familiar. She doesn't get mobbed in public or pursued by the paparazzi, even though she's been a big television star for more than a decade. But almost everyone knows her voice - the one that made "cowabunga!" and "don't have a cow" part of American pop culture. Cartwright, who portrays the notorious cartoon character Bart Simpson, will perform Sunday at the Margaret Smith Gallery in Ellicott City and sign paintings used in the production of the cartoon.
Advertisement
FEATURES
By Ed Bark and Ed Bark,Dallas Morning News | October 18, 1990
LOS ANGELES -- The voice of TV superboy Bart Simpson:A. Is a short, giggly, 32-year-old woman.B. Is the mother of a 10-month-old daughter named Lucy Mae.C. Has been under wraps until now.Check all three and you have Nancy Cartwright."I'm telling you, I am in heaven," she says. "This is like the most ideal job. I'm in the most enviable position of any actor in this town. I've got a great husband, I've got a wonderful little baby, and I'm Bart Simpson! I mean, who could ask for anything more?"
ENTERTAINMENT
By Karin Remesch | November 1, 2001
Meet the voice of BART SIMPSON Don't have a cow, man, when you meet the voice of Bart Simpson -- the spike-headed, yellow-skinned 10-year-old on The Simpsons. It's not a boy who's been lending his voice to the television cartoon character, it's grown-up actress Nancy Cartwright. You can chat with her and hear her read excerpts from her book, My Life as a 10-Year-Old Boy, from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. Sunday at Margaret Smith Gallery, 8090 Main St. in Ellicott City. She'll autograph her book and also sign original paintings used in making the cartoon.
NEWS
By Laura Cadiz and Laura Cadiz,SUN STAFF | November 1, 2001
Nancy Cartwright's name and face are not familiar. She doesn't get mobbed in public or pursued by the paparazzi, even though she's been a big television star for more than a decade. But almost everyone knows her voice - the one that made "cowabunga!" and "don't have a cow" part of American pop culture. Cartwright, who portrays the notorious cartoon character Bart Simpson, will perform Sunday at the Margaret Smith Gallery in Ellicott City and sign paintings used in the production of the cartoon.
NEWS
December 7, 1990
Sometimes imaginary characters take on a life of their own. That seems to have happened to that cartoon hero of underachievers -- Bart Simpson.The Iraqis have been trying the old trick of psychological warfare aimed at demoralizing U.S. troops. But according to one soldier's account of radio broadcasts by Baghdad Betty, the Persian Gulf equivalent of World War II's Tokyo Rose, we don't have much to worry about on this front. Baghdad Betty has been trying to spread anxiety among American troops by suggesting to the men that their girlfriends are cheating on them -- even dating celebrities like Tom Selleck, Paul Newman -- and Bart Simpson!
ENTERTAINMENT
By Lori Sears | July 29, 1999
The sparks will fly Spend Saturday afternoon with Bart Simpson, man. He'll be at Oregon Ridge Park at the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra's "Family Fun and Fireworks" event. Visitors will hear a concert of music from such movies as "Jurassic Park" and "Mulan," led by conductor Daniel Hege. Children can play games, create their own musical instruments and join a parade, led by Bart Simpson, around the park and stage. A caricaturist will be on hard to custom-draw kids with their favorite Disney character.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik | March 10, 1991
The top 10 most memorable moments of television coverage of the gulf war:1. Saddam Hussein's press conference in August, where he was surrounded by young American and English hostages. It was the first look many Americans had of him. The weird tableau -- an eerily smiling Hussein touching the confused and vulnerable children -- sent chills up the spines of some viewers.2. The pictures of the first American and British POWs, their faces badly cut and swollen. They offered the first up-close views of human suffering in the air war after days of self-congratulation over high-tech, Nintendo images of aerial triumphs.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | November 25, 1990
"Bart Simpson," Harry Marsiglia says. "You see what this world is coming to?"With the delicacy of an artist or a safecracker, he takes a little tuft of hair from an elderly customer's head and gently snips away."Batman," Harry says. "Can you imagine? The kids want haircuts like Batman. Bart Simpson and Batman. What's this world coming to?"Harry's beautiful. He's been cutting hair for 50 years now, ever since that tender moment when Harry was 14 and his father, Charles Marsiglia, handed him scissors and took off for the racetrack.
NEWS
August 21, 1992
"Trying to keep the clothes pressed has been a little bit of a problem. I look a little more wrinkled than most good Republicans -- more like a news reporter."-- Jay Wolfe of Clarksburg, W.Va., who was staying at a campground with his family while attending the convention."I was nervous. I had to use a little psychology on myself. I tried to pretend I was just talking to the Arkansas delegation and my husband."-- Christene Brownlee, an Arkansas delegate who as assistant secretary of the convention was assigned to repeat the delegate totals for each state during the roll call.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Lori Sears | July 29, 1999
The sparks will fly Spend Saturday afternoon with Bart Simpson, man. He'll be at Oregon Ridge Park at the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra's "Family Fun and Fireworks" event. Visitors will hear a concert of music from such movies as "Jurassic Park" and "Mulan," led by conductor Daniel Hege. Children can play games, create their own musical instruments and join a parade, led by Bart Simpson, around the park and stage. A caricaturist will be on hard to custom-draw kids with their favorite Disney character.
FEATURES
By Tamara Ikenberg and Tamara Ikenberg,SUN STAFF | February 18, 1998
It's a long way from "The Simpsons" to "South Park."A lot has changed since 1989, when the self-appointed guardians of America's youth worried about the impact spiky-haired Bart Simpson would have on youngsters and crusaded against T-shirts shouting "Eat My Shorts" and "Underachiever And Proud Of It."Now, even Bart would be shocked. Four crudely animated third-graders are kicking babies through windows, swearing like pint-sized sailors and breaking wind on demand.Those third-graders are Stan, Kyle, Kenny and Cartman, the perpetually bundled-up representatives of the regressive town of "South Park," the highest-rated series on Comedy Central.
FEATURES
By Tim Funk and Tim Funk,Knight-Ridder News Service | September 16, 1995
She has millions of fans -- Michael Jackson and Meryl Streep even asked for her autograph -- but you've probably never heard of her.Not as a woman anyway.To all but her family and friends, actress Nancy Cartwright is better known as the Voice of Bart Simpson on Fox's cartoon classic, "The Simpsons."That's right, man: America's most famous 10-year-old gets his pipes from a thirtysomething mother of two."I actually went in to audition for [Bart's sister] Lisa but couldn't get a hook on her," Ms. Cartwright told a table of TV critics during a summer luncheon in Los Angeles.
FEATURES
By Bob Dyer and Bob Dyer,Knight-Ridder News Service | January 23, 1994
Bart Simpson was displaying remarkably good table manners the other day at a Glendale (Calif.) restaurant.No slurping. No elbows on the table. Not a single "Don't have a cow, man" outburst.Why, she was a model citizen.She? Yep. Bart Simpson is a girl.A girl from Ohio, no less.Better make that a woman -- a 35-year-old woman who totes around snapshots of two kids, volunteers for an inner-city literacy program, and restricts her family's TV viewing to weekends.She's Nancy Cartwright.Happy being BartTo say Ms. Cartwright enjoys being Bart is to seriously understate things.
NEWS
By Jeff Leeds and Jeff Leeds,Contributing Writer | July 15, 1993
WASHINGTON -- A somewhat brash but articulate group of twentysomething urban professionals -- contrasting with their generation's reputation for political apathy and the values of TV character Bart Simpson -- declared their fear and anger over the swelling national debt yesterday and announced plans to form an interest group to represent them.Calling themselves a "post-partisan" organization, the members of the newly created Third Millennium issued a plea for fellow young adults to join and distributed copies of their manifesto, which charges that "those in power have practiced fiscal child abuse, mortgaging our future, and the futures of those to come."
NEWS
By Charles Rammel | January 8, 1993
YOU scum-sucking pus-bucket," my 3-year-old daughter said to me.I looked up from my newspaper to see the impish sparkle in her big green eyes, her cheeks dimpling in a grin. Of course, I recognized the voice of Moe, the bartender on the Simpsons, threatening the anonymous prank telephone caller (Bart Simpson) who has just asked if I.P. Freely's at his tavern -- or is it Oliver Clothes-off, or Mike Rotch?Anna didn't really understand what she'd just said, but instinctively she knew she was treading the fine line across which trouble brews.
FEATURES
By Tim Funk and Tim Funk,Knight-Ridder News Service | September 16, 1995
She has millions of fans -- Michael Jackson and Meryl Streep even asked for her autograph -- but you've probably never heard of her.Not as a woman anyway.To all but her family and friends, actress Nancy Cartwright is better known as the Voice of Bart Simpson on Fox's cartoon classic, "The Simpsons."That's right, man: America's most famous 10-year-old gets his pipes from a thirtysomething mother of two."I actually went in to audition for [Bart's sister] Lisa but couldn't get a hook on her," Ms. Cartwright told a table of TV critics during a summer luncheon in Los Angeles.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Karin Remesch | November 1, 2001
Meet the voice of BART SIMPSON Don't have a cow, man, when you meet the voice of Bart Simpson -- the spike-headed, yellow-skinned 10-year-old on The Simpsons. It's not a boy who's been lending his voice to the television cartoon character, it's grown-up actress Nancy Cartwright. You can chat with her and hear her read excerpts from her book, My Life as a 10-Year-Old Boy, from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. Sunday at Margaret Smith Gallery, 8090 Main St. in Ellicott City. She'll autograph her book and also sign original paintings used in making the cartoon.
NEWS
By GEORGE F. WILL | October 19, 1992
New York. -- The cab crawls through congealed traffic. The driver, an immigrant from some fragment of the Soviet Empire, understands little English.Lucky him. The political commercial snarling from the cab radio, reviles ''mudslide Bob Abrams'' as a thrower of ''manure.''The Democratic nominee for senator is Robert Abrams, the state's attorney general, who recently made news by skipping Manhattan's Columbus Day parade and calling his opponent, the two-term incumbent Alfonse D'Amato, a ''fascist.
NEWS
August 21, 1992
"Trying to keep the clothes pressed has been a little bit of a problem. I look a little more wrinkled than most good Republicans -- more like a news reporter."-- Jay Wolfe of Clarksburg, W.Va., who was staying at a campground with his family while attending the convention."I was nervous. I had to use a little psychology on myself. I tried to pretend I was just talking to the Arkansas delegation and my husband."-- Christene Brownlee, an Arkansas delegate who as assistant secretary of the convention was assigned to repeat the delegate totals for each state during the roll call.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.