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NEWS
By James M. Coram and James M. Coram,Staff Writer | September 7, 1993
The Howard County Council plans to do a little more tinkering with its anti-smoking bill tonight, but not enough, apparently, to avoid a veto.If amended as expected, the bill would still provide a small exception to an otherwise total ban on smoking in public places beginning July 1, 1996.Smoking would be permitted in a sealed-off portion of a restaurant if that area had a separate ventilating system."If they move all the exceptions, I'll sign it," County Executive Charles I. Ecker said Friday.
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NEWS
By John Fritze and John Fritze,sun reporter | March 1, 2007
Baltimore's smoking ban cleared a major political hurdle when it was approved by the City Council this week, but attention is now shifting to the city Health Department, which must grapple with enforcement of the law, as well as a potentially touchy loophole. Signed by Mayor Sheila Dixon yesterday, the smoking ban carries a loosely written provision that allows bars to seek a waiver from the Health Department if complying with its prohibitions would cause "undue financial hardship" - purposely vague language that will need to be defined in the coming months.
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NEWS
By James M. Coram and James M. Coram,Staff Writer | December 21, 1993
It would be "ludicrous" for the Howard County Council to remove exemptions from a recently enacted smoking ban, tobacco lobbyist Bruce Bereano said last night.The smoking ban takes effect July 1, 1996, allowing time for the General Assembly to enact a state-wide smoking ban. It provides exemptions for restaurant bars that are self-enclosed and have separate ventilation systems, overnight trucks stops and retail tobacco stores.Mr. Bereano told the council at last night's public hearing on a bill to remove the exemptions that he did not want to appear arrogant, but that "at no time will the state legislature ban smoking in bars and taverns."
NEWS
August 4, 2005
THE INTERNECINE disputes at the Baltimore Board of Liquor License Commissioners have reduced the agency to a bunch of political do-nothings. Citizen complaints of noisy, unruly bars and taverns have been ignored. Inactive liquor licenses have been left to molder with some holders continuing to pay yearly fees in violation of the law. And now the state prosecutor has launched an investigation - at the request of two former commissioners who were accused of wrongdoing by the board's chief inspector.
NEWS
By James M. Coram and James M. Coram,Staff Writer | June 22, 1993
Howard County will have to wait a little longer to discover whether it will have the toughest anti-smoking law in the state.An attempt to override County Executive Charles I. Ecker's veto of a bill banning smoking in all public places except bars and taverns on July 1, 1996, failed last night because Paul R. Farragut, D-4th, one of the four County Council members supporting the law was sick and unable to attend a special legislative session to reconsider it....
NEWS
By James M. Coram and James M. Coram,Staff Writer | July 22, 1993
The Howard County Council may decide tonight to place an almost total ban on smoking in public places beginning July 1, 1996.But County Executive Charles I. Ecker says almost is not good enough.Unless the ban is total, he says, he will veto the bill -- as he did a nearly identical bill June 18.The council will vote on the newest version of the smoking bill tonight. But first the council will hold an 8 p.m. work session on the bill in an attempt to reach a compromise on what, if any, exemptions should be allowed once the bill takes effect.
NEWS
July 21, 1993
Ironically, in order to avoid competition among its businesses for customers who smoke, Howard County may end up with an even stronger anti-smoking bill than the one originally proposed last spring and vetoed by the county executive.Republican Councilman Darrel Drown has proposed an amendment to the earlier bill that would strike an exemption for bars and taverns. In effect, that would mean all county public establishments and workplaces will be required to be smoke-free by July 1996. Mr. Drown says doing away with the exemption is necessary to avoid "internal competition" among businesses and facilitate enforcement.
NEWS
March 25, 2004
IT'S FAIR TO question the wisdom of large-scale police-directed raids on certain Baltimore liquor establishments, but state Sen. Joan Carter Conway's attempt to ban that practice outright shows a serious lapse of judgment. Ms. Conway's husband, Vernon Conway, is Baltimore's deputy chief liquor inspector. That conflict alone should have kept her from sponsoring legislation to restrict city police officers and sheriff's deputies from conducting these types of inspections. And while we're on the subject, she should be having second thoughts about accepting thousands of dollars in campaign contributions from the liquor industry for the same reason.
NEWS
By James M. Coram and James M. Coram,Staff Writer | July 19, 1993
The Howard County Council is expected to approve a tough new smoking ban this week without any exceptions.The anti-smoking bill, which is the last item on the agenda at tonight's public hearing, would ban smoking in public places beginning July 1, 1996, making it the toughest anti-smoking law in the state.As written, the bill exempts bars and taverns. But on Friday, 2nd District Councilman Darrel Drown submitted an amendment which would strike that exemption."I'm really afraid we're going to have internal competition within the county" if the exemption is not lifted, he said.
NEWS
By Marina Sarris and Marina Sarris,Sun Staff Writer Sun staff writer Frank Langfitt contributed to this article | March 11, 1995
A state Senate committee voted last night to weaken Maryland's landmark workplace smoking ban, flatly rejecting the governor's efforts to compromise.Afterward, Gov. Parris N. Glendening said he will veto the bill, which would exempt bars, hotels, restaurants and other tourist-oriented businesses from the smoking ban."We are obviously very disappointed," Mr. Glendening said. He blamed an "awesome demonstration of power by the tobacco lobbyists" for the committee's action.The anti-smoking regulation is at the center of a power struggle between the governor, its chief defender, and the legislature, whose leaders say the ban goes too far.As originally adopted by state occupational safety and health regulators, the ban would forbid smoking in almost all public and private indoor workplaces starting March 27.The regulation would apply to factories, offices, hotels, bars and restaurants.
NEWS
November 28, 2004
Who will protect us from our own county? Can anything be spared from large-scale development in Howard County? If you are a 280-year-old mansion in the middle of a state park would you be spared? If you are protected by easements placed by the Smithsonian Institution in consideration for the "gift to the nation" Ambassador Bruce gave when he sold the land to the federal government would you be spared? If your development required the county to spend $1 million it did not have to build a road through the state park to reach your development, would you be protected?
NEWS
March 25, 2004
IT'S FAIR TO question the wisdom of large-scale police-directed raids on certain Baltimore liquor establishments, but state Sen. Joan Carter Conway's attempt to ban that practice outright shows a serious lapse of judgment. Ms. Conway's husband, Vernon Conway, is Baltimore's deputy chief liquor inspector. That conflict alone should have kept her from sponsoring legislation to restrict city police officers and sheriff's deputies from conducting these types of inspections. And while we're on the subject, she should be having second thoughts about accepting thousands of dollars in campaign contributions from the liquor industry for the same reason.
NEWS
By Marina Sarris and Marina Sarris,Sun Staff Writer Sun staff writer Frank Langfitt contributed to this article | March 11, 1995
A state Senate committee voted last night to weaken Maryland's landmark workplace smoking ban, flatly rejecting the governor's efforts to compromise.Afterward, Gov. Parris N. Glendening said he will veto the bill, which would exempt bars, hotels, restaurants and other tourist-oriented businesses from the smoking ban."We are obviously very disappointed," Mr. Glendening said. He blamed an "awesome demonstration of power by the tobacco lobbyists" for the committee's action.The anti-smoking regulation is at the center of a power struggle between the governor, its chief defender, and the legislature, whose leaders say the ban goes too far.As originally adopted by state occupational safety and health regulators, the ban would forbid smoking in almost all public and private indoor workplaces starting March 27.The regulation would apply to factories, offices, hotels, bars and restaurants.
NEWS
By KEVIN THOMAS | December 26, 1993
No one has ever accused me of shying away from an unabashed appropriation of a cliche.So let me sign off the year with one old chestnut that would shame the wool off sheep.I've made a list, checked it twice. Going to write down what's happened in Howard this year, naughty and nice.Here goes:There have been some milestones -- two of which, sadly, faced challenges only last week.The County Council distinguished itself by passing a ban on smoking in all county public places, except some restaurant bars and taverns.
NEWS
By James M. Coram and James M. Coram,Staff Writer | December 21, 1993
It would be "ludicrous" for the Howard County Council to remove exemptions from a recently enacted smoking ban, tobacco lobbyist Bruce Bereano said last night.The smoking ban takes effect July 1, 1996, allowing time for the General Assembly to enact a state-wide smoking ban. It provides exemptions for restaurant bars that are self-enclosed and have separate ventilation systems, overnight trucks stops and retail tobacco stores.Mr. Bereano told the council at last night's public hearing on a bill to remove the exemptions that he did not want to appear arrogant, but that "at no time will the state legislature ban smoking in bars and taverns."
SPORTS
By JOHN EISENBERG | October 25, 1993
And so, on the last pro football Sunday before the NFL makes its expansion call, there was in our city one final tease. One more agonizing reminder of what we had, and lost, and want back so badly.A perfect day for football. A day for one of Grantland Rice's sonnets.A day with a deep blue sky and a white, slanting sun. A lightly chilling wind out of the north. Bright festoons of red and yellow leaves falling from the trees. A day to wear one sweat shirt and carry along another for the fourth quarter, when the sun dropped behind the upper deck.
NEWS
November 28, 2004
Who will protect us from our own county? Can anything be spared from large-scale development in Howard County? If you are a 280-year-old mansion in the middle of a state park would you be spared? If you are protected by easements placed by the Smithsonian Institution in consideration for the "gift to the nation" Ambassador Bruce gave when he sold the land to the federal government would you be spared? If your development required the county to spend $1 million it did not have to build a road through the state park to reach your development, would you be protected?
NEWS
By James M. Coram and James M. Coram,Staff Writer | September 7, 1993
The Howard County Council plans to do a little more tinkering with its anti-smoking bill tonight, but not enough, apparently, to avoid a veto.If amended as expected, the bill would still provide a small exception to an otherwise total ban on smoking in public places beginning July 1, 1996.Smoking would be permitted in a sealed-off portion of a restaurant if that area had a separate ventilating system."If they move all the exceptions, I'll sign it," County Executive Charles I. Ecker said Friday.
NEWS
By James M. Coram and James M. Coram,Staff Writer | July 22, 1993
The Howard County Council may decide tonight to place an almost total ban on smoking in public places beginning July 1, 1996.But County Executive Charles I. Ecker says almost is not good enough.Unless the ban is total, he says, he will veto the bill -- as he did a nearly identical bill June 18.The council will vote on the newest version of the smoking bill tonight. But first the council will hold an 8 p.m. work session on the bill in an attempt to reach a compromise on what, if any, exemptions should be allowed once the bill takes effect.
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