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Barry Louis Polisar

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NEWS
September 22, 1991
A year has passed, but thanks to some quiet legal work folk-singer Barry Louis Polisar is back in the Anne Arundel County school system's good graces. County children are now free again to hear such noted Polisar ditties as the classic "I've Got a Teacher; She's So Mean," the more contemporary "Diaper Rash (A Monster Song)," and the ever-popular "Don't Stick Your Finger Up Your Nose."Don't let the outrageous titles mislead you. The songs and books behind them offend only the ears of adults who are sadly out of touch with the reality of youngsters today.
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NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,Staff Writer | December 14, 1992
Lynore Arkin and her schoolmate, Lauren Solonche, sat in the front row singing and laughing."Don't put your finger up your nose," the two 11-year-old Columbia girls chanted in unison, "because your nose knows it's not the place it goes.""It's got a good beat," Lauren observed."I need a tape of this," added Lynore.Lynore and Lauren were among 150 children and parents who packed Linden Hall in Dorsey's Search Village Center yesterday afternoon for a Hanukkah party with children's singer and songwriter Barry Louis Polisar.
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NEWS
By Andrew Reiner | September 21, 1990
ANYONE who values the First Amendment should be outraged.School officials in Anne Arundel County earlier this month banned singer-song writer Barry Louis Polisar and all his works -- nine records, six books and two videos. And in a sad example of me-tooism, Colgate Elementary School in Dundalk canceled a November concert by Polisar after officials read in the newspapers about what had happened in nearby Arundel.Polisar's crime? Fifteen years after he began performing for school kids, county educators have determined that he is a poor "role model," that his material might arouse the wrong kinds of feelings in children.
NEWS
September 22, 1991
A year has passed, but thanks to some quiet legal work folk-singer Barry Louis Polisar is back in the Anne Arundel County school system's good graces. County children are now free again to hear such noted Polisar ditties as the classic "I've Got a Teacher; She's So Mean," the more contemporary "Diaper Rash (A Monster Song)," and the ever-popular "Don't Stick Your Finger Up Your Nose."Don't let the outrageous titles mislead you. The songs and books behind them offend only the ears of adults who are sadly out of touch with the reality of youngsters today.
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,Staff Writer | December 14, 1992
Lynore Arkin and her schoolmate, Lauren Solonche, sat in the front row singing and laughing."Don't put your finger up your nose," the two 11-year-old Columbia girls chanted in unison, "because your nose knows it's not the place it goes.""It's got a good beat," Lauren observed."I need a tape of this," added Lynore.Lynore and Lauren were among 150 children and parents who packed Linden Hall in Dorsey's Search Village Center yesterday afternoon for a Hanukkah party with children's singer and songwriter Barry Louis Polisar.
NEWS
By Dianne Williams Hayes and Dianne Williams Hayes,Staff writer | March 28, 1991
A mob of 2,500 young White House visitors will get to hear something Monday that most county school children cannot -- the songs of folk singer Barry Louis Polisar.Polisar, whose material has been banned by county schools, and his three-toed, triple-eyed, double-jointed dinosaur will be the guests of George and Barbara Bush at the annual Easter egg roll on the White House lawn.The singer and composer hasn't worked much in the county since September, when a review committee ruled his tapes, records and six books inappropriate for children.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Lori Sears | November 18, 1999
Kids' entertainer Laugh yourself silly with Barry Louis Polisar Sunday at the Jewish Book Festival. The children's entertainer and author entertains kids and parents alike with songs, stories and poems. Well-known for songs including "My Brother Thinks He's a Banana" and "I Lost My Pants," Polisar also stars in his own nationally syndicated television show, "Field Trip." Sunday's program is geared to preschool-age children and up. Barry Louis Polisar appears Sunday at 2 p.m. at the Jewish Book Festival at the Rosenbloom Owings Mills JCC, 3506 Gwynnbrook Ave. $3 per child; free for parents.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Karin Remesch | February 1, 1996
The Babe's 101stHelp celebrate the 101st birthday of Baltimore's greatest slugger with a cake and champagne toast and applaud the six winners of the "Birthday Cards for the Babe" contest at noon Feb. 6 at the Babe Ruth Museum, 216 Emory St. Recently acquired Babe Ruth and Oriole memorabilia will be unveiled in the museum's "New Stuff" exhibit area. The festivities will continue from 5:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. in Bambino's at Oriole Park at Camden Yards for a traditional baseball menu of all-you-can-eat hot dogs, hot pretzels, popcorn, beer, soft drinks and appearances by former Orioles Mark Williamson and Gregg Olson.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jess Blumberg | January 16, 2003
What's on the agenda when an award-winning children's author and musician visits the Baltimore County library system's only Winter Reading Club? Well, here's a sneak peek of things to come when Barry Louis Polisar, a four-time Parents Choice Award-winner and the star of the Emmy Award-winning TV show Field Trip, makes an appearance at the Arbutus Branch Library on Wednesday. The entertainer plans to read his new book, A Little Less Noise, which is a collection of song lyrics arranged as poetry.
EXPLORE
January 31, 2012
Students at Pine Grove Elementary School on Dulaney Valley Road were set to be doubly entertained this week with educational performances on and off campus. On Wednesday, Feb. 1, second-grade students at Pine Grove Elementary School were scheduled to attend a live performance of "Henry and Mudge" at Goucher College, presented by TheatreWorks USA. The production supplements classwork; the students have been reading about the adventures of Henry and his canine buddy Mudge in recent weeks.
NEWS
By Dianne Williams Hayes and Dianne Williams Hayes,Staff writer | March 28, 1991
A mob of 2,500 young White House visitors will get to hear something Monday that most county school children cannot -- the songs of folk singer Barry Louis Polisar.Polisar, whose material has been banned by county schools, and his three-toed, triple-eyed, double-jointed dinosaur will be the guests of George and Barbara Bush at the annual Easter egg roll on the White House lawn.The singer and composer hasn't worked much in the county since September, when a review committee ruled his tapes, records and six books inappropriate for children.
NEWS
By Andrew Reiner | September 21, 1990
ANYONE who values the First Amendment should be outraged.School officials in Anne Arundel County earlier this month banned singer-song writer Barry Louis Polisar and all his works -- nine records, six books and two videos. And in a sad example of me-tooism, Colgate Elementary School in Dundalk canceled a November concert by Polisar after officials read in the newspapers about what had happened in nearby Arundel.Polisar's crime? Fifteen years after he began performing for school kids, county educators have determined that he is a poor "role model," that his material might arouse the wrong kinds of feelings in children.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jarrett Graver | October 23, 1997
Around the worldOffer your children a more sophisticated air this Saturday by taking them to the Chesapeake Children's Museum's first "Round the World Festival" at Anne Arundel Community College. The festival will expose children of all ages to various multicultural activities, including arts and crafts, storytelling, native dancing and games from around the globe. The silent auction allows patrons to bid on both international and local products, and area restaurants will provide tastes of ethnic and regional cuisine.
FEATURES
By Randi Henderson | March 28, 1991
Children's performer Barry Louis Polisar -- who last made the news six months ago when his work was banned from Anne Arundel County schools -- will be playing at the White House next week."
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