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Barry Landau

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By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | June 27, 2012
Disgraced collector Barry H. Landau was sentenced Wednesday to seven years in federal prison for stealing thousands of historic documents worth as much as $2.5 million from archives along the East Coast, including one in Baltimore, where the scheme unraveled last summer. The 64-year-old Manhattan resident, who for years fooled celebrities and political players into believing he had significant ties to the White House, was also ordered to pay $46,525 in restitution and to stay away from all archives and libraries after he is released.
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NEWS
By Will Fesperman, The Baltimore Sun | June 14, 2014
When Samuel L. Morison of Crofton was charged this week with stealing documents from the U.S. Navy's archive in Washington, it was a rare event for the facility. "There has not been a theft like this in recent memory," said Paul Taylor, a spokesman for the Naval History and Heritage Command, from whose collection Morison allegedly took three boxes of files used by his grandfather, Pulitzer Prize-winning historian Samuel Eliot Morison. Theft is a very real danger within the quiet rooms of the nation's historical research facilities.
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NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | August 5, 2011
A federal judge rejected Friday a last-ditch effort by prosecutors to keep Barry H. Landau behind bars while the New York collector awaits trial on charges he pulled off one of the country's biggest theft of national memorabilia over a span of years. The 63-year-old will be put on a train in Baltimore on Monday and sent back to his $2,700-a-month, rent-controlled Manhattan apartment in Midtown under the strict conditions of electronic GPS monitoring. He will be barred from accessing the Internet, cannot keep his passport, can have no contact with museums, can't sell assets without approval and can't have any communication with his co-defendant, Jason Savedoff.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | May 27, 2013
They left the Maryland Historical Society tucked inside the coat pockets and notebooks of Barry Landau and his assistant, but the historical documents returned in manila envelopes, neatly packed inside a gray cardboard file box. Authorities continue to reunite more than 10,000 items "of cultural heritage" to museums and libraries along the East Coast that were targeted by Landau and his assistant Jason Savedoff. This month the Maryland Historical Society has received about one-third of 60 documents stolen.
NEWS
By Will Fesperman, The Baltimore Sun | June 14, 2014
When Samuel L. Morison of Crofton was charged this week with stealing documents from the U.S. Navy's archive in Washington, it was a rare event for the facility. "There has not been a theft like this in recent memory," said Paul Taylor, a spokesman for the Naval History and Heritage Command, from whose collection Morison allegedly took three boxes of files used by his grandfather, Pulitzer Prize-winning historian Samuel Eliot Morison. Theft is a very real danger within the quiet rooms of the nation's historical research facilities.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | October 4, 2011
A National Archives and Records Administration employee pleaded guilty Tuesday to embezzling government property — including a recording of Babe Ruth's voice — and selling it on eBay, the Maryland U.S. attorney's office announced. Leslie Charles Waffen, 66, worked for the NARA since 1969, swiped at least 955 sound recordings worth $30,000 and stashed them in his home or sold them online, according to prosecutors, who charged Waffen last week with stealing from the United States.
NEWS
By Jean Marbella, The Baltimore Sun | August 16, 2011
On an invitingly bright summer day, the reading room at the Historical Society of Pennsylvania starts filling up nonetheless as soon as the doors open: professors, Ph.D. candidates and amateur genealogists alike stream in to spend hours perusing the yellowed letters and faded land records, the presidential papers and everyday ephemera that are stored in the group's vaults. While the staff continues to lend out such historic documents, it is with a warier eye now that the Philadelphia-based archive and others learn that they may have been victims of what investigators say was a veritable national treasure hunt by Barry Landau and Jason Savedoff to steal valuable artifacts.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | March 7, 2012
Document thief Barry Landau may have sold more of the national treasures he stole from museums — including the Maryland Historical Society in Baltimore, where his scheme unraveled — than previously thought, according to the National Archives inspector general, who said Wednesday that his investigators have uncovered new evidence. Members of the agency's Archival Recovery Team are now targeting historic document dealers who illegally, if unknowingly, bought pieces from Landau for $500 to $6,000 apiece, based on the disgraced collector's own sales records, which were found during an FBI search of Landau's Manhattan apartment.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | May 27, 2013
They left the Maryland Historical Society tucked inside the coat pockets and notebooks of Barry Landau and his assistant, but the historical documents returned in manila envelopes, neatly packed inside a gray cardboard file box. Authorities continue to reunite more than 10,000 items "of cultural heritage" to museums and libraries along the East Coast that were targeted by Landau and his assistant Jason Savedoff. This month the Maryland Historical Society has received about one-third of 60 documents stolen.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann, Steve Kilar and Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | February 7, 2012
Barry H. Landau, the once-esteemed collector of presidential memorabilia, admitted in federal court Tuesday that he stole thousands of documents regarded as cultural treasures from historical societies and libraries in Baltimore and up the East Coast. The 63-year-old's guilty plea, to two criminal counts involving theft of artwork, revealed a scheme in which prosecutors said he compiled lists of items to steal by matching names of historical figures, from poets to president, to their "potential monetary value.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | June 27, 2012
Disgraced collector Barry H. Landau was sentenced Wednesday to seven years in federal prison for stealing thousands of historic documents worth as much as $2.5 million from archives along the East Coast, including one in Baltimore, where the scheme unraveled last summer. The 64-year-old Manhattan resident, who for years fooled celebrities and political players into believing he had significant ties to the White House, was also ordered to pay $46,525 in restitution and to stay away from all archives and libraries after he is released.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | March 7, 2012
Document thief Barry Landau may have sold more of the national treasures he stole from museums — including the Maryland Historical Society in Baltimore, where his scheme unraveled — than previously thought, according to the National Archives inspector general, who said Wednesday that his investigators have uncovered new evidence. Members of the agency's Archival Recovery Team are now targeting historic document dealers who illegally, if unknowingly, bought pieces from Landau for $500 to $6,000 apiece, based on the disgraced collector's own sales records, which were found during an FBI search of Landau's Manhattan apartment.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann, Steve Kilar and Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | February 7, 2012
Barry H. Landau, the once-esteemed collector of presidential memorabilia, admitted in federal court Tuesday that he stole thousands of documents regarded as cultural treasures from historical societies and libraries in Baltimore and up the East Coast. The 63-year-old's guilty plea, to two criminal counts involving theft of artwork, revealed a scheme in which prosecutors said he compiled lists of items to steal by matching names of historical figures, from poets to president, to their "potential monetary value.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | October 4, 2011
A National Archives and Records Administration employee pleaded guilty Tuesday to embezzling government property — including a recording of Babe Ruth's voice — and selling it on eBay, the Maryland U.S. attorney's office announced. Leslie Charles Waffen, 66, worked for the NARA since 1969, swiped at least 955 sound recordings worth $30,000 and stashed them in his home or sold them online, according to prosecutors, who charged Waffen last week with stealing from the United States.
NEWS
By Jean Marbella, The Baltimore Sun | August 16, 2011
On an invitingly bright summer day, the reading room at the Historical Society of Pennsylvania starts filling up nonetheless as soon as the doors open: professors, Ph.D. candidates and amateur genealogists alike stream in to spend hours perusing the yellowed letters and faded land records, the presidential papers and everyday ephemera that are stored in the group's vaults. While the staff continues to lend out such historic documents, it is with a warier eye now that the Philadelphia-based archive and others learn that they may have been victims of what investigators say was a veritable national treasure hunt by Barry Landau and Jason Savedoff to steal valuable artifacts.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | August 5, 2011
A federal judge rejected Friday a last-ditch effort by prosecutors to keep Barry H. Landau behind bars while the New York collector awaits trial on charges he pulled off one of the country's biggest theft of national memorabilia over a span of years. The 63-year-old will be put on a train in Baltimore on Monday and sent back to his $2,700-a-month, rent-controlled Manhattan apartment in Midtown under the strict conditions of electronic GPS monitoring. He will be barred from accessing the Internet, cannot keep his passport, can have no contact with museums, can't sell assets without approval and can't have any communication with his co-defendant, Jason Savedoff.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | October 28, 2011
Jason Savedoff's bail was reduced and his travel restrictions were eased after he pleaded guilty in U.S. District Court this week to conspiracy and theft of major art, according to a court order made public Friday. Savedoff, 24, was indicted in July along with Barry Landau, 63, on charges that they stole dozens of historic documents worth more than $1 million from museums along the East Coast, including the Maryland Historical Society in Baltimore. Landau is still awaiting trial, but Savedoff pleaded guilty Thursday . He faces a maximum of 15 years in prison at his sentencing, scheduled for Feb. 10. According to a court order signed after his plea, but filed Friday, Savedoff's bond has been reduced from $250,000 to $150,000, with the difference to be paid to his mother, Antonia Schang, who has acted as her son's custodian during the court proceedings.
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