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Barry Goldwater

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By Jack W. Germond and Jules Witcover | June 8, 1998
WASHINGTON -- The conservatives of this generation could learn from Barry Goldwater, who died at 89 recently.As a longtime senator from Arizona and the Republican nominee for president in 1964, Goldwater was as militant in his dedication to conservatism as anyone in American politics today. But there were some significant differences in the way Goldwater played politics.The most important was the fact that Goldwater always saw those who disagreed with him on issues -- and there were many -- as adversaries who were wrong in his eyes but not as enemies who were morally flawed.
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By Jonah Goldberg | September 5, 2013
It's no secret that the right is going through what some call a healthy debate and what others see as an identity crisis. For some, the solution to what ails conservatism requires a sudden philosophical shift leftward to win back the last Rockefeller Republicans, presumably hanging on in nursing homes like stranded Japanese fighters who haven't gotten word that World War II is over. Others argue that Republicans must shake off the heresies of moderation and compromise and accept the unalloyed true faith of 100 percent conservatism.
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NEWS
May 30, 1998
WHEN Barry M. Goldwater retired from the U.S. Senate after 30 years, a Sun editorial called him "a seminal figure in American history." He played Moses to the conservative movement -- leading it to the edge of the Promised Land.Though Mr. Goldwater's Republican presidential campaign in 1964 was a fiasco (he lost by a staggering 16 million votes), he planted seeds of conservatism in the political arena. They would take root under Richard Nixon and bear fruit under Ronald Reagan.Barry Goldwater, who died yesterday at 89, was an outspoken -- and endearing -- political figure.
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