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By LIZ SMITH and LIZ SMITH,Tribune Media Services | May 20, 2008
LOOK, WHEN you're dealing with amounts of money this large, none of it is justifiable. There is no moral right to any of this. But I earned this money over 10-plus years, not in one single year."
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By LIZ SMITH and LIZ SMITH,Tribune Media Services | May 20, 2008
LOOK, WHEN you're dealing with amounts of money this large, none of it is justifiable. There is no moral right to any of this. But I earned this money over 10-plus years, not in one single year."
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By Yardena Arar and Yardena Arar,Los Angeles Daily News | February 26, 1992
LOS ANGELES -- Barry Diller's resignation from Fox Inc. stunned Hollywood's creative community, including some of the TV producers and filmmakers responsible for the studio's biggest recent successes.Mr. Diller announced his resignation Monday."I'm shocked," Keenan Ivory Wayans, creator and executive producer of "In Living Color," said in a statement."Everyone I've talked to at the studio says it comes as a complete surprise," said Matt Groening, creator and executive producer of "The Simpsons."
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By Susan Baer and Susan Baer,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | July 24, 2001
WASHINGTON - Katharine Graham used to say she liked to "turn out the town" when she threw one of her fabulous parties at her Georgetown mansion. Yesterday's monumental funeral for the publishing legend, who died last week at age 84, turned out not only the town - her town - but many of those who have powered the nation for the last half-century. Among the more than 3,000 people who filled Washington National Cathedral were luminaries from the media, politics and government, business, the arts - glittering testimony to the rarefied circles in which Mrs. Graham traveled and the vast, worldwide network of friends she built along the way. Most of those who attended, including hundreds of employees from her newspaper, The Washington Post, waited in the sweltering heat for the doors to open, forming lines that snaked around the cathedral grounds.
BUSINESS
By Mark Ribbing and Mark Ribbing,SUN STAFF | February 19, 1999
Talk about landing on your feet. Just last week, Barry Baker issued a surprise resignation from Sinclair Broadcast Group Inc. of Baltimore, where he headed day-to-day radio and television operations. At the time, Baker, 46, said only that he wanted to pursue new business opportunities.Yesterday, USA Networks Inc., the aggressive television and electronic-commerce company headed by broadcast mogul Barry Diller, announced that it has named Baker as its new president and chief operating officer.
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By Susan Baer and Susan Baer,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | July 24, 2001
WASHINGTON - Katharine Graham used to say she liked to "turn out the town" when she threw one of her fabulous parties at her Georgetown mansion. Yesterday's monumental funeral for the publishing legend, who died last week at age 84, turned out not only the town - her town - but many of those who have powered the nation for the last half-century. Among the more than 3,000 people who filled Washington National Cathedral were luminaries from the media, politics and government, business, the arts - glittering testimony to the rarefied circles in which Mrs. Graham traveled and the vast, worldwide network of friends she built along the way. Most of those who attended, including hundreds of employees from her newspaper, The Washington Post, waited in the sweltering heat for the doors to open, forming lines that snaked around the cathedral grounds.
BUSINESS
By Bloomberg Business News | August 11, 1995
NEW YORK -- Viacom Inc. is looking for a buyer for its majority stake in Spelling Entertainment Group Inc., producer of television hits such as "Beverly Hills 90210" and "Melrose Place."Viacom, which is seeking to shed assets and reduce debt, values Los Angeles-based Spelling at as much as $2 billion, said an investment banker familiar with Viacom's pricing strategy. Based on today's stock price, Spelling's market value is about $1.06 billion.The investment banker said candidates to buy Spelling include Westinghouse Electric Corp.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG BUSINESS NEWS | November 28, 1995
...$TC NEW YORK -- Home Shopping Network Inc. yesterday named Barry Diller chairman, hoping to use his programming acumen to shake the television retailer out of its also-ran status.In a second move related to Mr. Diller's TV ambitions, Silver King Communications Inc. said it agreed to buy Savoy Pictures Entertainment Inc., a television and movie producer that also owns four television stations, in stock.Under the terms of the purchase, Savoy shareholders will receive 0.2 shares of Silver King common stock for each Savoy share.
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By Ron Miller and Ron Miller,Knight-Ridder News Service | January 1, 1994
Who will successfully launch TV's fifth network: Warner Bros. or Paramount?Conventional wisdom among broadcasters is that there's enough potential national advertising revenue to support a fifth network, but not a sixth. Experts also doubt if there are enough non-aligned TV stations to give both proposed networks the nationwide coverage they need to create a network.Both Paramount and Warner Bros. claim they'll need to sign up enough affiliates to cover a minimum of 70 percent of the nation's TV markets to give national advertisers the audience guarantees they'll demand.
BUSINESS
Lorraine Mirabella | December 5, 2013
Online television service Aereo Inc. plans to expand to the Baltimore area starting Dec. 16, offering monthly subscriptions starting at $8 for viewing or recording live television on smart phones, tablets and laptops, the Long Island City-based company said Thursday. The technology, which converts TV broadcast signals into computer data sent over the Internet, will be available to more than 2.7 million consumers in Baltimore city and Anne Arundel, Baltimore, Caroline, Carroll, Cecil, Harford, Howard, Kent, Queen Anne's and Talbot counties.
BUSINESS
By Mark Ribbing and Mark Ribbing,SUN STAFF | February 19, 1999
Talk about landing on your feet. Just last week, Barry Baker issued a surprise resignation from Sinclair Broadcast Group Inc. of Baltimore, where he headed day-to-day radio and television operations. At the time, Baker, 46, said only that he wanted to pursue new business opportunities.Yesterday, USA Networks Inc., the aggressive television and electronic-commerce company headed by broadcast mogul Barry Diller, announced that it has named Baker as its new president and chief operating officer.
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By Yardena Arar and Yardena Arar,Los Angeles Daily News | February 26, 1992
LOS ANGELES -- Barry Diller's resignation from Fox Inc. stunned Hollywood's creative community, including some of the TV producers and filmmakers responsible for the studio's biggest recent successes.Mr. Diller announced his resignation Monday."I'm shocked," Keenan Ivory Wayans, creator and executive producer of "In Living Color," said in a statement."Everyone I've talked to at the studio says it comes as a complete surprise," said Matt Groening, creator and executive producer of "The Simpsons."
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | November 2, 1993
NEW YORK -- After weeks of haggling, lawyers for Paramount Communications and QVC Network Inc. met yesterday morning to discuss QVC's bid for Paramount.It was the first time representatives for the two sides had met officially since QVC commenced a hostile $9.6 billion bid that was roughly comparable to a friendly merger proposal from Viacom Inc.But by all accounts, the two sides were no closer to a rapprochement by the end of the day. In fact, neither Paramount's chairman, Martin S. Davis, or QVC's chairman, Barry Diller, bothered to attend.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jay Hancock and Jay Hancock,Sun Staff | November 2, 2003
The Man Who Tried to Buy the World, by Jo Johnson and Martine Orange. Portfolio. 288 pages. $25.95. For voyeurs of financial and managerial disasters, recent U.S. corporate scandals have raised the blinds on some fabulous romps. Perhaps we are sated. What could be more entertaining than Tyco's $2,200 wastebasket, WorldCom's vanishing expense entries or Enron's rigging of the California energy market? Here's what: The traditional venality of Wall Street -- plus the grandiosity of Hollywood.
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