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April 13, 2010
What do you make of Barry Bonds praising Mark McGwire for admitting his steroid use? Don't expect Bonds to follow suit Peter Schmuck, Baltimore Sun It makes me all warm and fuzzy to hear Barry Bonds is "proud" of Mark McGwire for admitting his use of steroids and returning to Major League Baseball as the Cardinals' hitting coach, but I'm not holding my breath waiting for Bonds to do the same thing. No. 1: He wouldn't. Bonds is a proud, stubborn and defiant man who isn't going to do anything that smacks of surrender to the will of the masses.
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By Matt Vensel | July 8, 2013
As Orioles slugger Chris Davis sits here in early July with 33 homers and 85 runs batted in, precisely as many as he had in each of those categories in all of last season, it seems like a foregone conclusion that if he stays healthy he will break Brady Anderson's franchise record of 50 home runs in a single season, set back in 1996. But will Davis be able to set the “legitimate” all-time major league record for home runs in a single season? Davis is on the record as saying that he still views Roger Maris as the single-season home run king because " he was the last guy to do it clean . " Ahead of Maris on the home run list are Barry Bonds, Mark McGwire (twice)
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SPORTS
By BILL ORDINE | December 7, 2007
Barry Bonds clearly has lost touch with reality. His agent, Jeff Borris, recently said he's actively seeking out contending teams for Bonds to sign with for next season because the 43-year-old player wants to go out a World Series winner. Remember, even in his hometown of San Francisco - one of the few places Bonds was cheered - he was shown the door. So, let's review: A) Bonds is facing an indictment on federal perjury and obstruction of justice charges (which the agent contends won't conflict with next season)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kit Waskom Pollard,
For The Baltimore Sun
| April 19, 2013
Paolo Romeo believes that food is art. The chef-owner of Artful Gourmet, which has been an Owings Mills mainstay for just over a decade, isn't wildly avant-garde in the kitchen. He doesn't take chances on creative dishes. But Romeo does take an artist's care with his capable interpretations of Italian food and global favorites. And the restaurant's adoption of the food-is-art theme adds charm to a menu stocked with familiar fare. His conservative approach, which focuses on well-worn classics like lamb chops and simple pastas, appears to be a hit with locals, who keep the restaurant busy.
NEWS
By STEVE CHAPMAN | April 5, 2006
CHICAGO -- In 1998, when Mark McGwire was hitting home runs on a pace to break Roger Maris' record of 61 in a season, Barry Bonds detected a racist plot. "They're just letting him do it because he's a white boy," he groused to his girlfriend, according to a new book, Game of Shadows. Alas, we haven't heard his explanation of why "they" let a black man, Mr. Bonds, demolish Mr. McGwire's record just three years later. Or who "they" are. Was it a conspiracy of pale-faced pitchers? Embroiled in a scandal over his alleged use of steroids, Mr. Bonds, of the San Francisco Giants, finds that few people are rooting for him to break Hank Aaron's career mark.
SPORTS
By CHILDS WALKER | May 8, 2008
I hope some club signs Barry Bonds this summer. And I hope he leads that team to the playoffs with a fusillade of walks and 450-foot homers. I don't wish for this because I have any rooting interest in Bonds. Whether he never homers again or hits 50 more, my opinion of him won't change. No, what I'm rooting for is the unconventional, a general manager who doesn't give a hoot about disapproving scrutiny as long as Bonds can help his team win. If we're going to create entertainment markets in which we reward those who win at all costs, then by Job, I want some executive to stick his neck out and make this move.
SPORTS
By Dan Connolly and Dan Connolly,SUN REPORTER | February 13, 2007
New spring, same old top story. There are plenty of intriguing subplots as baseball breaks from its winter hiatus and pitchers and catchers start playing long toss this week in Arizona and Florida. But, as usual, none can top the sport's most consistent newsmaker, the incomparable Barry Bonds. Throughout this decade, Bonds has been a must-read spring story: Can he still play at a Most Valuable Player level? Will he hit a historic number of home runs? Is he healthy? Is he cracking under media scrutiny?
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck,SUN STAFF | October 6, 2001
SAN FRANCISCO - When Mark McGwire hit 70 home runs in 1998 to shatter Roger Maris' 37-year-old single-season record, it was the stuff of baseball legend. When Barry Bonds came to the plate in the first inning of last night's game against the Los Angeles Dodgers at Pacific Bell Park, it became history. Bonds launched his 71st home run of the season off Dodgers right-hander Chan Ho Park to make short work of the 3-year-old mark and confirm his status as one of the greatest players ever to apply a piece of hardwood to horsehide.
SPORTS
By DON MARKUS and DON MARKUS,SUN REPORTER | April 2, 2006
The spring training clubhouse of the San Francisco Giants seems no different from that of other major league teams. The veterans are settling into the routines that will carry them through October, the nonroster players are hoping for their chance to make it to Opening Day. The team is looking to redeem itself for a mediocre 2005. But there is a parallel universe operating inside this room at Scottsdale Stadium. In it, there is only one player. His name is Barry Bonds, the team's star and now its stigma, a 41-year-old legend who might someday be remembered as the game's all-time home run champion but, if the allegations in two recent books about his longtime steroid use are true, will also be recalled as its greatest cheat.
SPORTS
By PETER SCHMUCK | May 10, 2008
When the Major League Baseball Players Association confirmed the other day that it's investigating whether the 30 big league clubs are conspiring to keep Barry Bonds out of the game this year, I couldn't help but laugh. Does anyone seriously believe it would take some nefarious scheme to convince everyone in the game to steer clear of Bad News Barry at a point in his career when he is (a) 43 years old; (b) barely mobile; (c) under federal indictment for perjury in the Bay Area Laboratory Co-Operative grand jury investigation; and (d)
SPORTS
By Dan Connolly and The Baltimore Sun | January 10, 2013
When it was announced that no candidate had received the 75 percent inclusion on ballots needed to be inducted into this year's Baseball Hall of Fame class , I can't say I was surprised. I honestly thought Houston's Craig Biggio might get in - he led all candidates with 68.2 percent of the vote - but wasn't shocked that he fell short. This was an exceptionally difficult year for voting, and there was a whole lot of sentiment toward making a statement. The Baseball Writers' Association of America surely did that.
SPORTS
January 9, 2013
Bonds, Clemens snubbed Dan Connolly Baltimore Sun It's not surprising that no one received the needed 75 percent of BBWAA ballots. It's also not surprising that Craig Biggio, he of the 3,060 career hits for the Astros, was the highest vote-getter with 68.2 percent. What surprised me was that suspected performance-enhancing drug users Barry Bonds (36.2 percent) and Roger Clemens (37.6), arguably the two best players in the Steroid Era, were named on barely one-third of the ballots.
SPORTS
By Dan Connolly and The Baltimore Sun | November 28, 2012
The Baseball Writers' Association of America released its Hall of Fame ballot today, and now the next six weeks will be filled with debate on whether some of the biggest names -- and most controversial characters -- will get into Cooperstown's hallowed halls. Players on the ballot for the first time include a few stars that were embroiled in the sport's steroid controversy: namely Barry Bonds, Roger Clemens and former Orioles outfielder Sammy Sosa. Mike Piazza, Craig Biggio and Curt Schilling also are first-timers, joining popular holdovers such as Jeff Bagwell, Jack Morris and Tim Raines on the ballot.
NEWS
August 6, 2010
Hammerin' Hank Phil Rogers Chicago Tribune Gotta admit, my knee-jerk response is to say gimme Alex Rodriguez, the positive steroid test in 2003 notwithstanding. There's no more important position than shortstop, and that's where I start if I'm building a team. But my final answer here is Hank Aaron, and without a lot of internal debate. The Hammer played in the National League when pitchers dominated, yet you could rarely tell it by his at-bats.
SPORTS
April 13, 2010
What do you make of Barry Bonds praising Mark McGwire for admitting his steroid use? Don't expect Bonds to follow suit Peter Schmuck, Baltimore Sun It makes me all warm and fuzzy to hear Barry Bonds is "proud" of Mark McGwire for admitting his use of steroids and returning to Major League Baseball as the Cardinals' hitting coach, but I'm not holding my breath waiting for Bonds to do the same thing. No. 1: He wouldn't. Bonds is a proud, stubborn and defiant man who isn't going to do anything that smacks of surrender to the will of the masses.
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck | May 23, 2009
ZIMMERMAN REACHES 40 Nationals third baseman Ryan Zimmerman's 30-game hitting streak ended recently, but he still has the baseball world on a string. He homered in the fourth inning off Rich Hill to reach base in his 40th consecutive game. The modern NL record is 58, which is shared by Barry Bonds (twice, 2000-2001 and 2003) and Duke Snider (1954). REIMOLD ROCKS AGAIN Left fielder Nolan Reimold launched his second major league home run in the second inning off Washington starter Jordan Zimmermann.
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck,SUN STAFF | April 16, 2002
SAN FRANCISCO - Before there was the Enron scandal, there was the Enron Field fiasco. The Houston Astros, determined not to take part in Barry Bonds' assault on the single-season home run record in September, walked him repeatedly during the final week of the regular season. The result: Bonds hit only one homer, but he scored four runs off the eight walks; the Giants swept the nationally televised three-game series; and Astros manager Larry Dierker - his strategy widely criticized and his team quickly ousted from the playoffs - soon became a former manager.
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck,SUN STAFF | June 11, 2004
Think about it. There may come a point during this weekend's interleague series between the Orioles and San Francisco Giants when the game is too close for comfort and superstar Barry Bonds is standing in the batter's box with evil intent. Think about it hard. This is the first time Orioles fans will have a chance to see Bonds up close in Baltimore since he appeared in the 1993 All-Star Game at Camden Yards - and really the only time since he ballooned into the bigger-than-life Barry Bonds who has persuaded more than one manager to throw the book of traditional baseball strategy out the window.
SPORTS
By PETER SCHMUCK | February 10, 2009
So, I guess this is the point at which we finally look at the steroid era and concede there is nothing else that would surprise us - short, of course, of Cal Ripken Jr. suddenly going on 60 Minutes to admit that all the milk he was drinking was spiked with stanozolol. Alex Rodriguez has come forward to confess he used illegal performance-enhancing drugs during the early years of this decade and he's truly sorry for it. Never mind that what he's really sorry about is that his positive steroid test in 2003 that was supposed to be anonymous got leaked to the media, but let's not split hairs.
SPORTS
By PETER SCHMUCK | October 9, 2008
In an SI.com story, Barry Bonds says he has had fun during his first full season out of baseball and is enjoying his freedom from the game. Barry, of course, might have to enjoy his freedom while he can. He's still awaiting trial on 14 counts of making false statements to a grand jury and one count of obstruction of justice. I also think, by and large, baseball fans have enjoyed their freedom from him. (For more, go to baltimoresun.com/schmuckblog)
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