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NEWS
December 10, 1991
An eroding, uninhabited island in Chesapeake Bay that harbors important colonies of waterfowl and shore birds has been purchased by a conservation group.Barren Island -- 200 acres of salt marsh, pine woods and meadows -- was bought from its two owners last month for $280,000 by the Conservation Fund of Arlington, Va., said spokesman Jack Lynn. The money came from the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation.The island has an active American bald eagle nest and the only colony of black skimmers, a state-threatened bird, in the Maryland portion of the bay.
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NEWS
By Stephen Kiehl and Stephen Kiehl,SUN STAFF | July 5, 2002
BARREN ISLAND - The baby pelicans hatching here this summer are beastly things, with featherless purple bodies and fleshy pouches that quiver under their beaks. They would resemble lizards, if they weren't so ugly. But in the eyes of wildlife ecologist Dave Brinker, they're a beautiful and welcome addition to the Chesapeake Bay - an encouraging sign that the bay's ecosystem is strong enough to attract more species. Spring marked the first time that the once-endangered brown pelicans nested on this spit of sand and scrub in the bay southwest of Cambridge.
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NEWS
By Kirk Johnson and Kirk Johnson,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 3, 2000
NEW YORK - It was a place of the discarded and the dead. There were no roads. There was said to be nothing green that could live. The smell could sicken at a distance of two miles. In the early years of the 20th century, the tiny island off the coast of Brooklyn was a nightmare: a dumping ground for most of the trash and animal carcasses of the teeming city. Yet it was also a living community, full of families and children and immigrants dreaming of a better life as they sorted, scavenged and rendered New York's garbage.
NEWS
By Kirk Johnson and Kirk Johnson,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 3, 2000
NEW YORK - It was a place of the discarded and the dead. There were no roads. There was said to be nothing green that could live. The smell could sicken at a distance of two miles. In the early years of the 20th century, the tiny island off the coast of Brooklyn was a nightmare: a dumping ground for most of the trash and animal carcasses of the teeming city. Yet it was also a living community, full of families and children and immigrants dreaming of a better life as they sorted, scavenged and rendered New York's garbage.
NEWS
By Stephen Kiehl and Stephen Kiehl,SUN STAFF | July 5, 2002
BARREN ISLAND - The baby pelicans hatching here this summer are beastly things, with featherless purple bodies and fleshy pouches that quiver under their beaks. They would resemble lizards, if they weren't so ugly. But in the eyes of wildlife ecologist Dave Brinker, they're a beautiful and welcome addition to the Chesapeake Bay - an encouraging sign that the bay's ecosystem is strong enough to attract more species. Spring marked the first time that the once-endangered brown pelicans nested on this spit of sand and scrub in the bay southwest of Cambridge.
NEWS
By Dail Willis and Dail Willis,SUN STAFF | May 8, 1997
HOOPER ISLAND -- Handel Hutchinson's voice cracks with anger."This is one of the most gruesome things I've ever seen," he says, pointing to a videotape he made last week of six dead swans. "One mother swan was shot laying on the nest with her eggs."Hutchinson and many other residents of this remote Dorchester County island are outraged by the recent killing of a half-dozen mute swans on nearby, uninhabited Barren Island by state and federal wildlife officials. But state and federal biologists defend the shooting, saying it is unpleasant but necessary to control a burgeoning mute swan population that poses a serious threat to several threatened smaller species of water birds.
NEWS
By Tom Horton and Tom Horton,SUN STAFF | May 30, 1997
CONSIDER MUTE swans, which are white and elegant and which, this month, were shotgunned by biologists in the name of ecological balance.And consider the snapping turtle, squat and mean, on whose behalf Maryland's governor just vetoed a fishing bill -- again in the name of what was right, ecologically.The short, simple answer to why the snappers were upheld and the swans done in is that the former are a natural part of the Chesapeake ecosystem, and the latter are not. The turtles, which only a mother turtle could love, nonetheless, fit in.They may very occasionally swallow a fuzzy duckling, which is what seemed to spark a bill authorizing baited lines of hooks to clear out snappers where waterfront owners wished their nature mellowed out.But waterfowl that raise young around the bay have coexisted with snappers since before there was a bay, and are doing just fine.
SPORTS
By Peter Baker | October 13, 1994
ROCKFISHThe recreational season for rockfish has been extended through Nov. 22, according to the Department of Natural Resources, and until the cold snap this week, it seemed it might take that long for bay water temperatures to cool and for stripers to start to school.However, cold nights are dropping the water temperature quickly and rockfish action should be improving.In the Chesapeake Bay above the bay bridges, good choices for rockfish are holes and humps at the following locations: Poole's Island, Craihill Light, Snake Reef, Tea Kettle Shoals, Worton Point, Love Point, 7-Foot Knoll and the Dumping Grounds.
NEWS
By Robert C. Keith | October 7, 1991
OVER THE Labor Day weekend, I captained a nature study tour through one of Maryland's least-known and most beautiful waterways, the Honga River.Traveling in very traditional style aboard the 63-year-old renovated oyster "buyboat" Half Shell, our group of 30 departed Solomons, at the mouth of the Patuxent River, crossed Chesapeake Bay, passed through the zig-zag channel of Tar Bay and "Barren Island Gap," squeezed past the old wooden swing bridge at Fishing...
SPORTS
By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,SUN STAFF | July 10, 1997
At early evening the boat swung to anchor along the hard edge off Barren Island, where the Chesapeake Bay bottom drops away quickly from 10 to 50 feet and croaker, spot and sea trout often feed in the midst of summer.The last of the spring-summer seasons for rockfish had ended Sunday, and a long run down the bay for bluefish had been disappointing, with only a handful of two-pounders to show for the effort.But in the evening croaker usually bite hard and often, and the sharp edge off Barren Island seemed an excellent place to fish and snack as the last of the breeze went out of the day and the bay lay down flat for the run north to the Severn River.
SPORTS
By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,SUN STAFF | July 10, 1997
At early evening the boat swung to anchor along the hard edge off Barren Island, where the Chesapeake Bay bottom drops away quickly from 10 to 50 feet and croaker, spot and sea trout often feed in the midst of summer.The last of the spring-summer seasons for rockfish had ended Sunday, and a long run down the bay for bluefish had been disappointing, with only a handful of two-pounders to show for the effort.But in the evening croaker usually bite hard and often, and the sharp edge off Barren Island seemed an excellent place to fish and snack as the last of the breeze went out of the day and the bay lay down flat for the run north to the Severn River.
NEWS
By Tom Horton and Tom Horton,SUN STAFF | May 30, 1997
CONSIDER MUTE swans, which are white and elegant and which, this month, were shotgunned by biologists in the name of ecological balance.And consider the snapping turtle, squat and mean, on whose behalf Maryland's governor just vetoed a fishing bill -- again in the name of what was right, ecologically.The short, simple answer to why the snappers were upheld and the swans done in is that the former are a natural part of the Chesapeake ecosystem, and the latter are not. The turtles, which only a mother turtle could love, nonetheless, fit in.They may very occasionally swallow a fuzzy duckling, which is what seemed to spark a bill authorizing baited lines of hooks to clear out snappers where waterfront owners wished their nature mellowed out.But waterfowl that raise young around the bay have coexisted with snappers since before there was a bay, and are doing just fine.
NEWS
By Dail Willis and Dail Willis,SUN STAFF | May 8, 1997
HOOPER ISLAND -- Handel Hutchinson's voice cracks with anger."This is one of the most gruesome things I've ever seen," he says, pointing to a videotape he made last week of six dead swans. "One mother swan was shot laying on the nest with her eggs."Hutchinson and many other residents of this remote Dorchester County island are outraged by the recent killing of a half-dozen mute swans on nearby, uninhabited Barren Island by state and federal wildlife officials. But state and federal biologists defend the shooting, saying it is unpleasant but necessary to control a burgeoning mute swan population that poses a serious threat to several threatened smaller species of water birds.
SPORTS
By Peter Baker | October 13, 1994
ROCKFISHThe recreational season for rockfish has been extended through Nov. 22, according to the Department of Natural Resources, and until the cold snap this week, it seemed it might take that long for bay water temperatures to cool and for stripers to start to school.However, cold nights are dropping the water temperature quickly and rockfish action should be improving.In the Chesapeake Bay above the bay bridges, good choices for rockfish are holes and humps at the following locations: Poole's Island, Craihill Light, Snake Reef, Tea Kettle Shoals, Worton Point, Love Point, 7-Foot Knoll and the Dumping Grounds.
FEATURES
August 7, 1994
"Vacation: A period of suspension of work, study or other activity, usually used for rest, recreation, or travel; recess or holiday."So says the Random House Dictionary. But after reading the entries from our "Vacation Nightmares" essay contest, we at Sun Magazine think that perhaps the definition of "vacation" should be expanded, as hospitals and hurricanes seem to be frequent intrusions on even the most perfectly planned vacations. Your stories showed us that real-life vacations often contain more mosquitoes than margaritas, more delays at airports than dips in the ocean.
NEWS
December 10, 1991
An eroding, uninhabited island in Chesapeake Bay that harbors important colonies of waterfowl and shore birds has been purchased by a conservation group.Barren Island -- 200 acres of salt marsh, pine woods and meadows -- was bought from its two owners last month for $280,000 by the Conservation Fund of Arlington, Va., said spokesman Jack Lynn. The money came from the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation.The island has an active American bald eagle nest and the only colony of black skimmers, a state-threatened bird, in the Maryland portion of the bay.
FEATURES
August 7, 1994
"Vacation: A period of suspension of work, study or other activity, usually used for rest, recreation, or travel; recess or holiday."So says the Random House Dictionary. But after reading the entries from our "Vacation Nightmares" essay contest, we at Sun Magazine think that perhaps the definition of "vacation" should be expanded, as hospitals and hurricanes seem to be frequent intrusions on even the most perfectly planned vacations. Your stories showed us that real-life vacations often contain more mosquitoes than margaritas, more delays at airports than dips in the ocean.
ENTERTAINMENT
Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | May 7, 2014
The Maryland Seafood Marketing Program, an effort of the state's Department of Natural Resources, has started up its fourth season of chef education tours.  The tours offer culinary professionals an opportunity to see Chesapeake seafood products up close, and to harvest them alongside the watermen who derive their livelihood on the bay. In its first three years, more than 400 chefs have enrolled in the education tours, on which they've explored...
NEWS
By Robert C. Keith | October 7, 1991
OVER THE Labor Day weekend, I captained a nature study tour through one of Maryland's least-known and most beautiful waterways, the Honga River.Traveling in very traditional style aboard the 63-year-old renovated oyster "buyboat" Half Shell, our group of 30 departed Solomons, at the mouth of the Patuxent River, crossed Chesapeake Bay, passed through the zig-zag channel of Tar Bay and "Barren Island Gap," squeezed past the old wooden swing bridge at Fishing...
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