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Barre Circle

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BUSINESS
By Mary Medland and Mary Medland,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 8, 1998
It could have been a scene right out of an English novel set in the 1930s.On the village green, neighbors -- many wearing tuxedos or vintage clothing -- were playing croquet. Onlookers sipped punch and munched on cucumber sandwiches and dainties. The winning team was roundly applauded.But the aforementioned scene took place just last summer -- right in the middle of downtown Baltimore -- as the Barre (pronounced Barry) Circle Community Association held its first croquet tournament.A National Historic Community, the little-known neighborhood boasts about 120 houses that were built between 1840 and 1890 to house both the wave of immigrants arriving and the blue-collar workers employed by the local industries.
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NEWS
By Nick Madigan and Nick Madigan,Sun reporter | April 13, 2008
For the past 15 years, proud residents of the once-shoddy Barre Circle neighborhood in Pigtown - many of whom bought their houses from the city for a dollar - have held a cleanup day one Saturday a month. At the residents' request, a city official long ago agreed to let a trash truck came by, regular as clockwork, to haul the trash, debris and trimmings away. The three-square-block neighborhood, now lined with impeccably restored red-brick rowhouses, became a model of spotlessness, its green spaces trimmed and tidy, its sidewalks uncluttered.
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NEWS
By Joe Mathews and Joe Mathews,SUN STAFF | July 20, 1998
On a green lawn in Southwest Baltimore yesterday, Susan Mullenex, in bonnet and sun dress, sipped champagne. Sissy Bryant handed out marmalade and egg salad sandwiches.On the croquet field of Barre Circle's second annual tournament, Sam Cushman and Joseph Brown, both decked out in the Bermuda shorts of English gentlemen, dueled shot for shot, with Brown sealing the victory on the final two wickets."Sure, it seems strange to have croquet, a croquet tournament in this neighborhood," said Harris Levy, who lives there and publishes a local newsletter.
NEWS
By JEAN MARABELLA | May 22, 2007
Carol Ott said the change came when she started to think of them as fellow businesspeople who have set up shop on the main street of the neighborhood just as she has. Only thing is, they sell drugs, and she sells coffee. She had tried calling the police, she tried going to community meetings. Still, they remained. Finally, she took matters into her own hands and laid down her own law. "One was standing outside the restaurant, and I said, `Don't even think about it,'" said Ott, who owns a sweet little coffeehouse and cafe, Evelyn's, on Washington Boulevard in Pigtown.
BUSINESS
By Annie Linskey and Annie Linskey,SUN STAFF | November 16, 2003
Judy Aleksalza keeps a framed photograph of a dilapidated brick townhouse on a wall near her kitchen. The rear wall is entirely missing, beams are exposed to the elements, and debris litters the front. The photo could be of a bombed house in postwar Dresden. It is, in fact, a picture of her Barre Circle home -- taken in 1977 after she bought it through the city's famous $1 program and started an elaborate renovation process. Aleksalza is one of the dozen or so homesteaders in Barre Circle who still live in the houses they bought from the city during the mid- to late 1970s.
NEWS
By Allison Klein and Allison Klein,SUN STAFF | July 29, 2001
Sissy Bryant, sporting the same white dress she wears every year, raised her voice so she wouldn't be drowned out by the MTA bus chugging along Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard behind her. "They're official Boca Raton rules," Bryant said, passing out a packet of "nine-wicket court setting" rules as spelled out by the United States Croquet Association. Yesterday was the annual croquet tournament in Barre Circle, the tucked-away West Baltimore neighborhood that borders Pigtown and has patches of green large enough to turn into street-side sporting fields.
NEWS
By MARY MEDLAND | July 18, 2001
Several weeks ago, Baltimore wags were having a fine time with Mayor Martin O'Malley's new slogan, "Baltimore, the Greatest City in America." For once, I managed to keep my mouth shut. Or, more precisely, to keep fingers away from keyboard, which is difficult since I make a living as a writer and editor. Truth be told, however, I did ponder a rewrite along the lines of "Baltimore: Can't Get Much Worse Than This." In spite of the challenges facing the city, I live in Barre Circle, which is undoubtedly one of the best neighborhoods in town.
NEWS
By JEAN MARABELLA | May 22, 2007
Carol Ott said the change came when she started to think of them as fellow businesspeople who have set up shop on the main street of the neighborhood just as she has. Only thing is, they sell drugs, and she sells coffee. She had tried calling the police, she tried going to community meetings. Still, they remained. Finally, she took matters into her own hands and laid down her own law. "One was standing outside the restaurant, and I said, `Don't even think about it,'" said Ott, who owns a sweet little coffeehouse and cafe, Evelyn's, on Washington Boulevard in Pigtown.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | September 21, 1995
Barre Circle residents are annoyed that more people can't find their self-described "enclave of civility."This Southwest Baltimore neighborhood sits within sight of Oriole Park along the western edge of Martin Luther King Boulevard. In the 1970s it was one of the old neighborhoods city government showcased to coax the middle class to live downtown.Today, its cleaned bricks have weathered nicely, and moss grows on garden walls. Street trees planted 15 years ago are so tall they've had to be pruned.
NEWS
By James Bock and James Bock,Staff Writer | May 24, 1993
The Orchards, a North Baltimore area of stately elms and brick colonials where six-figure incomes are the norm, is the city's most affluent neighborhood, according to a new planning department study.Median household income of $103,041 in The Orchards, near Bryn Mawr School, was more than four times the citywide figure, the report shows. The statistic means that half the neighborhood's 171 households took in more than $103,041 in 1989 and half less.The study offers the first snapshot of more than 260 Baltimore neighborhoods -- their population, racial mix, educational level, income and other data -- as assessed by the 1990 census.
BUSINESS
By Annie Linskey and Annie Linskey,SUN STAFF | November 16, 2003
Judy Aleksalza keeps a framed photograph of a dilapidated brick townhouse on a wall near her kitchen. The rear wall is entirely missing, beams are exposed to the elements, and debris litters the front. The photo could be of a bombed house in postwar Dresden. It is, in fact, a picture of her Barre Circle home -- taken in 1977 after she bought it through the city's famous $1 program and started an elaborate renovation process. Aleksalza is one of the dozen or so homesteaders in Barre Circle who still live in the houses they bought from the city during the mid- to late 1970s.
NEWS
By Allison Klein and Allison Klein,SUN STAFF | July 29, 2001
Sissy Bryant, sporting the same white dress she wears every year, raised her voice so she wouldn't be drowned out by the MTA bus chugging along Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard behind her. "They're official Boca Raton rules," Bryant said, passing out a packet of "nine-wicket court setting" rules as spelled out by the United States Croquet Association. Yesterday was the annual croquet tournament in Barre Circle, the tucked-away West Baltimore neighborhood that borders Pigtown and has patches of green large enough to turn into street-side sporting fields.
NEWS
By MARY MEDLAND | July 18, 2001
Several weeks ago, Baltimore wags were having a fine time with Mayor Martin O'Malley's new slogan, "Baltimore, the Greatest City in America." For once, I managed to keep my mouth shut. Or, more precisely, to keep fingers away from keyboard, which is difficult since I make a living as a writer and editor. Truth be told, however, I did ponder a rewrite along the lines of "Baltimore: Can't Get Much Worse Than This." In spite of the challenges facing the city, I live in Barre Circle, which is undoubtedly one of the best neighborhoods in town.
NEWS
By Joe Mathews and Joe Mathews,SUN STAFF | July 20, 1998
On a green lawn in Southwest Baltimore yesterday, Susan Mullenex, in bonnet and sun dress, sipped champagne. Sissy Bryant handed out marmalade and egg salad sandwiches.On the croquet field of Barre Circle's second annual tournament, Sam Cushman and Joseph Brown, both decked out in the Bermuda shorts of English gentlemen, dueled shot for shot, with Brown sealing the victory on the final two wickets."Sure, it seems strange to have croquet, a croquet tournament in this neighborhood," said Harris Levy, who lives there and publishes a local newsletter.
BUSINESS
By Mary Medland and Mary Medland,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 8, 1998
It could have been a scene right out of an English novel set in the 1930s.On the village green, neighbors -- many wearing tuxedos or vintage clothing -- were playing croquet. Onlookers sipped punch and munched on cucumber sandwiches and dainties. The winning team was roundly applauded.But the aforementioned scene took place just last summer -- right in the middle of downtown Baltimore -- as the Barre (pronounced Barry) Circle Community Association held its first croquet tournament.A National Historic Community, the little-known neighborhood boasts about 120 houses that were built between 1840 and 1890 to house both the wave of immigrants arriving and the blue-collar workers employed by the local industries.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | September 21, 1995
Barre Circle residents are annoyed that more people can't find their self-described "enclave of civility."This Southwest Baltimore neighborhood sits within sight of Oriole Park along the western edge of Martin Luther King Boulevard. In the 1970s it was one of the old neighborhoods city government showcased to coax the middle class to live downtown.Today, its cleaned bricks have weathered nicely, and moss grows on garden walls. Street trees planted 15 years ago are so tall they've had to be pruned.
NEWS
By Nick Madigan and Nick Madigan,Sun reporter | April 13, 2008
For the past 15 years, proud residents of the once-shoddy Barre Circle neighborhood in Pigtown - many of whom bought their houses from the city for a dollar - have held a cleanup day one Saturday a month. At the residents' request, a city official long ago agreed to let a trash truck came by, regular as clockwork, to haul the trash, debris and trimmings away. The three-square-block neighborhood, now lined with impeccably restored red-brick rowhouses, became a model of spotlessness, its green spaces trimmed and tidy, its sidewalks uncluttered.
NEWS
By RICHARD IRWIN | May 21, 2004
Police Blotter is a sampling of crimes from police reports in Baltimore City and Baltimore County. Baltimore City Central District Shooting: Isaac Rosenberg, a homeless 47-year-old, was leaving a light rail train in the 1200 block of Mount Royal Ave. about 3 p.m. yesterday when two of four teen-age boys he had argued with aboard the train shot him several times in the neck with high-powered pellet pistols. Witnesses gave police descriptions of the youths, who were arrested nearby. Seized from the youths were two pellet pistols and several pellets.
NEWS
By James Bock and James Bock,Staff Writer | May 24, 1993
The Orchards, a North Baltimore area of stately elms and brick colonials where six-figure incomes are the norm, is the city's most affluent neighborhood, according to a new planning department study.Median household income of $103,041 in The Orchards, near Bryn Mawr School, was more than four times the citywide figure, the report shows. The statistic means that half the neighborhood's 171 households took in more than $103,041 in 1989 and half less.The study offers the first snapshot of more than 260 Baltimore neighborhoods -- their population, racial mix, educational level, income and other data -- as assessed by the 1990 census.
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