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Baroque Art

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By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,SUN ART CRITIC | September 24, 1995
Museums usually show art in birds-of-a-feather fashion. You see Renaissance art with other Renaissance art, not with ancient or modern art. You see European art with other European art, not with Asian art. You see paintings with other paintings, not with por- celains and jewelry.Those traditions get blasted wide open today when "Going for Baroque" debuts at the Walters Art Gallery. It's a show that mixes contemporary and Baroque art in strange and daring ways.A 28-foot-long, 10-foot-high painting created by American artist Frank Stella in 1994 hangs next to a 3-by-5-inch German relief sculpture of the late 17th century.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By [BRAD SCHLEICHER] | September 6, 2007
African- American photo album The lowdown -- Catch a glimpse into the lives of Howard County African-American families when the Howard County Center of African American Culture and Howard Community College present the exhibit Native African American Families of Howard County, Md., featuring more than 300 photos of families taken between 1875 and 1950. The collection includes family portraits and African-Americans at work, in the military and at worship. Many of the pictures, which were submitted by families in the area, are being shown for the first time.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By [BRAD SCHLEICHER] | September 6, 2007
African- American photo album The lowdown -- Catch a glimpse into the lives of Howard County African-American families when the Howard County Center of African American Culture and Howard Community College present the exhibit Native African American Families of Howard County, Md., featuring more than 300 photos of families taken between 1875 and 1950. The collection includes family portraits and African-Americans at work, in the military and at worship. Many of the pictures, which were submitted by families in the area, are being shown for the first time.
NEWS
By GLENN MCNATT and GLENN MCNATT,SUN ART CRITIC | October 16, 2005
For a moment in history, the tiny Dutch Republic was the greatest European maritime power and the most prosperous society the world had ever seen. And those who could, reveled in it. Any well-appointed home was a proud repository for fabulous bling bling from the four corners of the earth - paintings, sculpture, porcelains, gemstones, clocks, carpets, swords and knickknacks by the cartload that trumpeted its owner's good fortune and virtue. Even in neighboring Southern Netherlands, exhausted by war and sectarian strife, the wealthy enjoyed an ambience of opulence and magnificent display.
NEWS
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | September 9, 2005
From silk-screens by Andy Warhol at Washington's Corcoran Gallery of Art to color-drenched canvases by Monet at the Baltimore Museum of Art - the 2005-2006 season is packed with offerings for all types of art lovers. Among this year's most exciting events surely will be the Walters Art Museum's spectacular Palace of Wonders and its cornucopia of fabulous bling-bling, which goes on view Oct. 22. Paintings, sculpture, porcelains, gemstones, clocks, carpets, watches, swords and knickknacks by the cartload were the means by which aristocrats and mercantile princes of 17th-century Netherlands and Flanders trumpeted their good fortune and virtue.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | April 24, 2001
If Western music had ended with Johann Sebastian Bach's Mass in B minor in 1749, we would still be culturally rich. Hearing this ever-astonishing score, which was given an earnest performance Sunday by the Handel Choir of Baltimore at Goucher College, it's easy to agree with Charles Gounod's summation of the composer: "He has said all there is to say." The entire spectrum of the baroque art - counterpoint, fugue, dancing rhythms - is enshrined in this work, which Bach assembled toward the end of his life out of old and new material.
NEWS
August 30, 2005
Andronico Luksic, 78, a Chilean billionaire who built one of Latin America's biggest business empires, died Aug. 18 in Chile. His death was reported by Antofagasta PLC, the company where he served as chairman until retiring last year. Mr. Luksic once controlled a sprawling collection of mining, banking, telecommunications, manufacturing and beer companies. Most of the companies were in South America, but he also owned beach resorts in Croatia, the country his father emigrated from in the early 1900s.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Sun Art Critic | September 12, 1995
As you enter the "Bernardo Strozzi" exhibit at the Walters Art Gallery, you're confronted by one of the Italian baroque master's most fascinating paintings, his "Madonna and Child with St. John" of 1621-1622.This is no sweet-faced mother gazing fondly at the infant she holds. This madonna, seated with a barefoot up on her sewing basket and her head resting informally on her right hand, lifts her eyes from the book she's reading to look straight out at us. Here's a practical-looking, no-nonsense sort of woman, a person we can easily imagine chatting with.
NEWS
By GLENN MCNATT and GLENN MCNATT,SUN ART CRITIC | October 16, 2005
For a moment in history, the tiny Dutch Republic was the greatest European maritime power and the most prosperous society the world had ever seen. And those who could, reveled in it. Any well-appointed home was a proud repository for fabulous bling bling from the four corners of the earth - paintings, sculpture, porcelains, gemstones, clocks, carpets, swords and knickknacks by the cartload that trumpeted its owner's good fortune and virtue. Even in neighboring Southern Netherlands, exhausted by war and sectarian strife, the wealthy enjoyed an ambience of opulence and magnificent display.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Holly Selby and Holly Selby,Sun Staff | November 28, 1999
What is the difference between sight and vision?For 40 years, Sophia Libman has taken great joy in creating paintings in oils and acrylics, collages from found objects and drawings in pencil and ink. But since 1992, a disease called macular degeneration has been stealing her ability to see.She hasn't stopped creating art. As the 83-year-old's visual acuity has diminished, her ability to capture the essence of her subjects seems to have increased. Her brush strokes have become looser, simpler, more expressive.
NEWS
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | September 9, 2005
From silk-screens by Andy Warhol at Washington's Corcoran Gallery of Art to color-drenched canvases by Monet at the Baltimore Museum of Art - the 2005-2006 season is packed with offerings for all types of art lovers. Among this year's most exciting events surely will be the Walters Art Museum's spectacular Palace of Wonders and its cornucopia of fabulous bling-bling, which goes on view Oct. 22. Paintings, sculpture, porcelains, gemstones, clocks, carpets, watches, swords and knickknacks by the cartload were the means by which aristocrats and mercantile princes of 17th-century Netherlands and Flanders trumpeted their good fortune and virtue.
NEWS
August 30, 2005
Andronico Luksic, 78, a Chilean billionaire who built one of Latin America's biggest business empires, died Aug. 18 in Chile. His death was reported by Antofagasta PLC, the company where he served as chairman until retiring last year. Mr. Luksic once controlled a sprawling collection of mining, banking, telecommunications, manufacturing and beer companies. Most of the companies were in South America, but he also owned beach resorts in Croatia, the country his father emigrated from in the early 1900s.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | April 24, 2001
If Western music had ended with Johann Sebastian Bach's Mass in B minor in 1749, we would still be culturally rich. Hearing this ever-astonishing score, which was given an earnest performance Sunday by the Handel Choir of Baltimore at Goucher College, it's easy to agree with Charles Gounod's summation of the composer: "He has said all there is to say." The entire spectrum of the baroque art - counterpoint, fugue, dancing rhythms - is enshrined in this work, which Bach assembled toward the end of his life out of old and new material.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Holly Selby and Holly Selby,Sun Staff | November 28, 1999
What is the difference between sight and vision?For 40 years, Sophia Libman has taken great joy in creating paintings in oils and acrylics, collages from found objects and drawings in pencil and ink. But since 1992, a disease called macular degeneration has been stealing her ability to see.She hasn't stopped creating art. As the 83-year-old's visual acuity has diminished, her ability to capture the essence of her subjects seems to have increased. Her brush strokes have become looser, simpler, more expressive.
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN STAFF | February 22, 1998
In mid-January, a catalog of old master paintings for sale at Sotheby's, the New York auction house, arrived at the Walters Art Gallery, where Joaneath Spicer, curator of Renaissance and baroque art, picked it up in the museum library.One of the paintings caught her eye. It was a rare, exceptionally well-painted depiction of a Moorish officer, the handiwork of one Bartholomeus Maton, a little-known Dutch master of the late 17th century."I could see from the catalog that even though the painting was by a fairly obscure artist, it might well be something we would be interested in because of the subject and because it appeared to be very well-executed."
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,SUN ART CRITIC | December 10, 1996
As the new executive director of The Contemporary, Gary Sangster looks forward to mounting ambitious shows, increasing income and raising the institution's visibility -- all in the cause of making contemporary art relevant to people. Not over their heads or beneath their notice, but right where they are."I'm interested in the power and meaning of contemporary art and how exhibitions can help people understand it," says the new head of Baltimore's museum without walls. "The really big picture is to transform the public's attitude toward contemporary art. The public is disdainful and condescending toward contemporary art. We want to show that contemporary artists are intellectually and ethically engaged in discussion about the time we live in."
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,SUN ART CRITIC | December 10, 1996
As the new executive director of The Contemporary, Gary Sangster looks forward to mounting ambitious shows, increasing income and raising the institution's visibility -- all in the cause of making contemporary art relevant to people. Not over their heads or beneath their notice, but right where they are."I'm interested in the power and meaning of contemporary art and how exhibitions can help people understand it," says the new head of Baltimore's museum without walls. "The really big picture is to transform the public's attitude toward contemporary art. The public is disdainful and condescending toward contemporary art. We want to show that contemporary artists are intellectually and ethically engaged in discussion about the time we live in."
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN STAFF | February 22, 1998
In mid-January, a catalog of old master paintings for sale at Sotheby's, the New York auction house, arrived at the Walters Art Gallery, where Joaneath Spicer, curator of Renaissance and baroque art, picked it up in the museum library.One of the paintings caught her eye. It was a rare, exceptionally well-painted depiction of a Moorish officer, the handiwork of one Bartholomeus Maton, a little-known Dutch master of the late 17th century."I could see from the catalog that even though the painting was by a fairly obscure artist, it might well be something we would be interested in because of the subject and because it appeared to be very well-executed."
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,SUN ART CRITIC | September 24, 1995
Museums usually show art in birds-of-a-feather fashion. You see Renaissance art with other Renaissance art, not with ancient or modern art. You see European art with other European art, not with Asian art. You see paintings with other paintings, not with por- celains and jewelry.Those traditions get blasted wide open today when "Going for Baroque" debuts at the Walters Art Gallery. It's a show that mixes contemporary and Baroque art in strange and daring ways.A 28-foot-long, 10-foot-high painting created by American artist Frank Stella in 1994 hangs next to a 3-by-5-inch German relief sculpture of the late 17th century.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Sun Art Critic | September 12, 1995
As you enter the "Bernardo Strozzi" exhibit at the Walters Art Gallery, you're confronted by one of the Italian baroque master's most fascinating paintings, his "Madonna and Child with St. John" of 1621-1622.This is no sweet-faced mother gazing fondly at the infant she holds. This madonna, seated with a barefoot up on her sewing basket and her head resting informally on her right hand, lifts her eyes from the book she's reading to look straight out at us. Here's a practical-looking, no-nonsense sort of woman, a person we can easily imagine chatting with.
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