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By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 22, 1999
Everyone went for baroque at the Annapolis Symphony's Camerata Series chamber concert at Maryland Hall Friday night.J. S. Bach's Second Orchestral Suite, Antonio Vivaldi's Piccolo Concerto and Johann Pachelbel's ubiquitous Canon were on the bill, along with Edvard Grieg's "Holberg Suite," a work inspired by 18th-century dances even though it was written by a 19th-century Romantic composer.On the podium was Piotr Gajewski, who conducts regularly at Washington's Catholic University when he isn't jetting off to England, Canada, the Czech Republic or his native Poland to ride the international conducting merry-go-around.
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By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | September 29, 2014
As cellist Allen Whear pointed out during his typically droll welcome to the audience Sunday afternoon at Towson University's Center for the Arts, there are two big 40th anniversary seasons this year: "Saturday Night Live" and Pro Musica Rara . The latter's milestone, as Whear also noted, is all the more remarkable considering that the early music movement -- playing period instruments, attempting to follow historic performance practices --...
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By David Donovan and David Donovan,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 22, 1999
Fifty years ago an all-Baroque music concert would have been unthinkable. Today, after all the advances in musicology and performance practices re-creating the varied styles of the era, an all-Baroque concert is usually a hit. Saturday evening the Concert Artists of Baltimore played four masterpieces of this musical period. This listener is sad to report that the program just did not come up to the excellence associated with this ensemble.The Telemann Overture Perpetuum Mobile essentially opened the program with a thud.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | March 13, 2013
The sculpture court at the Walters Art Museum is one of Baltimore's most inviting spaces. Acoustically, it's a bit of a soup, but who cares in such an ambience? That point was drive home Sunday evening when An Die Musik Live and the Walters presented the last in this season's series of early music concerts. This one, which drew a spill-over crowd, featured one of the Baltimore Symphony's star players, principal trumpet Andrew Balio, in a bright burst of baroque repertoire.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith ... and Tim Smith ...,Sun music critic | May 2, 2008
The greatest act of musical reclamation to take place in the past 40 years or so may well be the one that returned Handel's operas to the active repertoire. Their melodic riches alone make them worth staging. But, thanks to Handel's early mastery of the theater, these works can still deliver compelling drama. It isn't always easy to remember that in Washington National Opera's new production of Tamerlano, which opened Wednesday night at the Kennedy Center, hobbled by David Zinn's mostly gray, antiseptic set design and Chas Rader-Schieber's curiously inert direction.
ENTERTAINMENT
By TIM SMITH and TIM SMITH,tim.smith@baltsun.com | January 29, 2009
While many folks will be making last-minute checks on stashes of beer and munchies Sunday, others will be spending the pre-Super Bowl hours reveling in baroque music. "SuperBach Sunday" is a long-running annual presentation by Pro Musica Rara, Baltimore's intrepid early-music organization. This year's concert features the return of two fine guests, soprano Ann Monoyios and trumpeter John Thiessen. The concert, which promises music by Bach, Handel and Purcell, will be at 3:30 p.m. at Towson University's Center for the Arts, Osler and Cross Campus drives.
NEWS
September 26, 2002
The Washington Kantorei will present "Pillars of the Baroque," a choral concert with a chamber orchestra, at 4 p.m. Sunday at First Evangelical Lutheran Church, 3604 Chatham Road, Ellicott City. Featured will be a modern premiere of the cantata Jesus sey mein erstes Wort by Georg Philipp Telemann, a renowned 18th-century German composer. "It's the first time it's been performed since probably the 18th century," said Baroque scholar and organist Dale Voelker, who directs the group. "It's never been published.
FEATURES
By TIM SMITH and TIM SMITH,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | July 10, 2006
After a bumpy - make that rainy and muddy - start to its outdoor concert season at Oregon Ridge early last week, the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra opened its indoor Summer MusicFest in the safety of Meyerhoff Symphony Hall Friday night. The program, also presented the night before at the Music Center at Strathmore in North Bethesda, was billed as "The Best of Baroque." It was nothing of the kind. Not an unadulterated note of Bach or Handel or Vivaldi to be found. Better to have called it "The Best of Big Band Baroque," since most of the concert held full-orchestra, larger-than-life transcriptions of music originally written for smaller forces.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | February 19, 2002
A chorus from Washington is heading to Baltimore - no, not to replace the hapless Baltimore Symphony Orchestra Chorus. This ensemble, which made plans to travel north long before BSO officials put an expiration date on the BSO choristers, is seeking to expand horizons as it celebrates 25 seasons of distinguished service to Johann Sebastian Bach and his contemporaries. The Washington Bach Consort enjoys a sterling reputation for refined, insightful music-making, and not just in D.C. The professional chorus of 24, regularly joined by a similar-sized orchestra of period instrument specialists, has visited other U.S. cities - including Baltimore in June 2000 - and made three European tours.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 23, 1999
Let others rant at the incongruity between acquisitive lust and a proper Christmas aesthetic.As lovers of great music, we consider ourselves immune from such trifling matters -- for we know that at Christmastime (and the rest of the year as well), the more music we have on hand, the better the quality of life will be for all of us.As halls are being decked and stockings hung, let's give some thought to musical masterworks that are perfect for gift-giving and for heightening our personal connection with the holiday season.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | October 19, 2012
It was a quiet night for a revolution. People at the bar in Joe Squared Station North sat huddled over drinks and conversations. Folks occasionally strolled in to pick up pizza orders or headed to dining tables in the back. Few even glanced at the small group of musicians nestled by the storefront window playing Bach. But those players, members of a national movement called Classical Revolution, soldiered on for several hours, dedicated to the cause of bringing a venerable old art form into unexpected places.
ENTERTAINMENT
By TIM SMITH and TIM SMITH,tim.smith@baltsun.com | January 29, 2009
While many folks will be making last-minute checks on stashes of beer and munchies Sunday, others will be spending the pre-Super Bowl hours reveling in baroque music. "SuperBach Sunday" is a long-running annual presentation by Pro Musica Rara, Baltimore's intrepid early-music organization. This year's concert features the return of two fine guests, soprano Ann Monoyios and trumpeter John Thiessen. The concert, which promises music by Bach, Handel and Purcell, will be at 3:30 p.m. at Towson University's Center for the Arts, Osler and Cross Campus drives.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 4, 2008
FILM 'It's a Wonderful Life' The Senator Theatre hosts its annual benefit for the GEDCO CARES Food pantry Sunday with its traditional double-bill. You can view Frank Capra's It's A Wonderful Life (11 a.m., 3:45 p.m., 8:30 p.m.) either as a heartwarming tale of a well-spent life or a devastating account of an existence so miserable that only the intervention of an angel can redeem it (James Stewart, who stars, is so good it works either way). Then exult in the pathos-streaked exuberance of the premium 1951 British version of Dickens' A Christmas Carol, starring Alastair Sim as Scrooge (1:45 p.m., 6:30 p.m.)
FEATURES
By Tim Smith ... and Tim Smith ...,Sun music critic | May 2, 2008
The greatest act of musical reclamation to take place in the past 40 years or so may well be the one that returned Handel's operas to the active repertoire. Their melodic riches alone make them worth staging. But, thanks to Handel's early mastery of the theater, these works can still deliver compelling drama. It isn't always easy to remember that in Washington National Opera's new production of Tamerlano, which opened Wednesday night at the Kennedy Center, hobbled by David Zinn's mostly gray, antiseptic set design and Chas Rader-Schieber's curiously inert direction.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,Sun music critic | April 29, 2008
Shafts of light stream through narrow windows to form angular patterns on gray walls and ceilings. Men in black uniforms of roughly mid-20th- century vintage stand ominously in the background. It's all very film noir-ish on the stage of the Kennedy Center Opera House, an interesting look for a work that dates from 1724. If you go Tamerlano will be performed at 7 p.m. tomorrow, 7:30 p.m. Friday and four more times through May 22 at the Kennedy Center, Virginia and New Hampshire avenues, Northwest, Washington.
NEWS
July 20, 2007
International band -- World Artists Experiences will present Musica Ficta at 3:30 p.m. Sunday at Maryland Hall for the Creative Arts, 801 Chase St., Annapolis. This Colombian band will perform music from the early Renaissance and Baroque periods. Free. 410-647-4482 or www.worldartists.org.
FEATURES
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 22, 1997
Several years ago, I read about an early-music festival held yearly in a town in one of the Maritime Provinces in Canada. Is this event still being presented?It's a safe bet you are thinking of the International Festival of Baroque Music in Lameque, New Brunswick, which will present its 22nd season July 11-20. (The dates for 1998 are July 29 to Aug. 3.)The first weekend of the festival this year features Canadian artists; the second concentrates on Europeans. La Mission St.-Charles choir and orchestra will perform Bach cantatas July 11-12.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 30, 2003
Dollars to doughnuts, the wise guy who dismissed baroque music as "Muzak for the intelligentsia" never heard of Red Priest. He probably would have known that "Red Priest" was the nickname for red-headed Antonio Vivaldi, who was indeed ordained but found more fame as a composer in 18th-century Venice than he ever could have as a churchman. But Red Priest is also a quartet of English baroque specialists that has become famous for swashbuckling, highly theatrical performances of works composed by its namesake and others.
NEWS
By Sarah Hoover and Sarah Hoover,special to the sun | April 13, 2007
When it comes to food, the culinary traditions of France and Italy are easy to distinguish: The refined elegance of classic French cuisine stands in sharp contrast to the bolder flavors of the Italian table. So, too, it is in music, particularly during the baroque era, where the contrast in culture and temperament is as different as butter and olive oil. This war of taste between French and Italian musical styles, raging heatedly in the mid-18th century during the reigns of Louis XIV and Louis XV, will be brought to life by early music ensemble Chatham Baroque at 8 p.m. tomorrow in Smith Theatre, Howard Community College under the auspices of Candlelight Concerts.
FEATURES
By TIM SMITH and TIM SMITH,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | July 10, 2006
After a bumpy - make that rainy and muddy - start to its outdoor concert season at Oregon Ridge early last week, the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra opened its indoor Summer MusicFest in the safety of Meyerhoff Symphony Hall Friday night. The program, also presented the night before at the Music Center at Strathmore in North Bethesda, was billed as "The Best of Baroque." It was nothing of the kind. Not an unadulterated note of Bach or Handel or Vivaldi to be found. Better to have called it "The Best of Big Band Baroque," since most of the concert held full-orchestra, larger-than-life transcriptions of music originally written for smaller forces.
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