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Barney Fife

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NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | July 28, 1994
American Joe Miedusiewski brought Barney Fife out of mothballs strictly by accident. Barney never had a bullet to call his own, and neither, it turns out, did Parris Glendening. But everybody who watched Andy Griffith knew about poor Barney's plight, while nobody around here knew the facts about Glendening.Former police commissioner, Glendening was calling himself. He was saying this in the television commercials he launched several weeks back, geared specifically toward Baltimore voters who had never even heard of Glendening until he started running for governor.
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NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr | July 8, 2012
MAYBERRY, N.C. -- Former sheriff Andy Taylor died here last week. Mayberry is in mourning. Sheriff Taylor was one of the last links to another, simpler time. Before there was a traffic light or drive-through banking here, before we got our first cellphone tower or Wi-Fi connection, before the Dairy Queen, the Wal-Mart and the Subway were built out on Route 89, before color was invented, back when people still appeared to one another in shades of black and white, Mayberry was a very different town in a very different America.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By FORT WORTH STAR-TELEGRAM | February 18, 2001
Andy Griffith is everywhere. On "Matlock" reruns, solving crimes and eating chili dogs. On reruns of "The Andy Griffith Show" as a single parent counseling his son, Opie, played by a young Ron Howard. He even made an appearance on a recent episode of "Dawson's Creek." Now Andy is in Sunday school. Joey Fann, a 35-year-old computer engineer, has developed a series of Sunday school lessons based on the moral and ethical lessons illustrated by the TV adventures of Andy, Opie, Barney Fife, Gomer Pyle and others.
NEWS
By SCOTT COLLINS and SCOTT COLLINS,LOS ANGELES TIMES | February 26, 2006
HOLLYWOOD -- Don Knotts, the saucer-eyed, scarecrow-thin comic actor best known for his roles as the high-strung, small-town deputy Barney Fife on the 1960s CBS series The Andy Griffith Show and the leisure-suit-clad landlord Ralph Furley on ABC's '70s sitcom Three's Company, has died. He was 81. Mr. Knotts, who lived in West Los Angeles, died Friday night of lung cancer at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles, according to Sherwin Bash, his longtime manager. Family members said that his longtime friend Mr. Griffith was one of his last visitors.
NEWS
By William F. Zorzi Jr. and William F. Zorzi Jr.,Sun Staff Writer | July 26, 1994
State Sen. American Joe Miedusiewski is attacking again.In the latest of a series of hard-hitting radio ads, Mr. Miedusiewski lampoons the front-running Democratic candidate for governor, Parris N. Glendening, suggesting that he was the Barney Fife of law enforcement.The radio spot, which begins airing today statewide for eight days, spoofs Mr. Glendening's days as a Hyattsville councilman in 1973 and 1974, when he also served as police commissioner, overseeing a department that numbered 20 at the time.
NEWS
By SCOTT COLLINS and SCOTT COLLINS,LOS ANGELES TIMES | February 26, 2006
HOLLYWOOD -- Don Knotts, the saucer-eyed, scarecrow-thin comic actor best known for his roles as the high-strung, small-town deputy Barney Fife on the 1960s CBS series The Andy Griffith Show and the leisure-suit-clad landlord Ralph Furley on ABC's '70s sitcom Three's Company, has died. He was 81. Mr. Knotts, who lived in West Los Angeles, died Friday night of lung cancer at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles, according to Sherwin Bash, his longtime manager. Family members said that his longtime friend Mr. Griffith was one of his last visitors.
FEATURES
By Joyce Millman and Joyce Millman,San Francisco Examiner | October 19, 1993
Baby boomers used to believe that life ended at 30. Then, thanks to TV, life began at thirtysomething. Now, with the TV generation clocking in at 40 and beyond, and apprehensively dealing with their own kids' surly teenhood, the tube has once again come through with a boomer fountain of youth.It's called aging parents. Prime time is filled these days with 40-year-old adolescents still rebelling against Mom and Dad.On ABC's "Roseanne," Roseanne Connor has one daughter who eloped at 18, another who has the disposition of Wednesday Addams and a 12-year-old son who has just started skipping school.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr | July 8, 2012
MAYBERRY, N.C. -- Former sheriff Andy Taylor died here last week. Mayberry is in mourning. Sheriff Taylor was one of the last links to another, simpler time. Before there was a traffic light or drive-through banking here, before we got our first cellphone tower or Wi-Fi connection, before the Dairy Queen, the Wal-Mart and the Subway were built out on Route 89, before color was invented, back when people still appeared to one another in shades of black and white, Mayberry was a very different town in a very different America.
FEATURES
By Bob Hiaasen and Bob Hiaasen,Staff Writer | December 16, 1993
If we had to do the holiday shopping for some of TV's most popular characters, what would we get?* Detective Andy Sipowicz of "NYPD Blue": Long-sleeved, pinpoint Oxford dress shirts from Lands End.* Detective John Kelly, "NYPD Blue": Boxer shorts -- because we're tired of seeing your backside. Well, some of us are tired of it.* Maggie O'Connell, "Northern Exposure": Although she never would admit it, Maggie would go goo-goo over Robert James Waller's "Slow Waltz in Cedar Bend."* Dr. Joel Fleischman, "Northern Exposure": Maggie, while high on Waller.
NEWS
By Peter Jensen and Peter Jensen,SUN STAFF | March 8, 1998
ST. MICHAELS -- A couple attends a Valentine's Day murder-mystery weekend on the Eastern Shore, and soon after watching the play's groom get poisoned, the husband winds up dead, set on fire in his hotel room, and his wife is charged with murder.Offer this as a movie synopsis, and it sounds too cliched, too much like a bad television rerun. Yet the death of 35-year-old Stephen Michael Hricko of Laurel was decidedly real, and its intrigue has catapulted a community to national fame.And what a perfect America-in-the-'90s ordeal it is: The local author of the play is seeking movie offers through a Hollywood agent.
ENTERTAINMENT
By FORT WORTH STAR-TELEGRAM | February 18, 2001
Andy Griffith is everywhere. On "Matlock" reruns, solving crimes and eating chili dogs. On reruns of "The Andy Griffith Show" as a single parent counseling his son, Opie, played by a young Ron Howard. He even made an appearance on a recent episode of "Dawson's Creek." Now Andy is in Sunday school. Joey Fann, a 35-year-old computer engineer, has developed a series of Sunday school lessons based on the moral and ethical lessons illustrated by the TV adventures of Andy, Opie, Barney Fife, Gomer Pyle and others.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | July 28, 1994
American Joe Miedusiewski brought Barney Fife out of mothballs strictly by accident. Barney never had a bullet to call his own, and neither, it turns out, did Parris Glendening. But everybody who watched Andy Griffith knew about poor Barney's plight, while nobody around here knew the facts about Glendening.Former police commissioner, Glendening was calling himself. He was saying this in the television commercials he launched several weeks back, geared specifically toward Baltimore voters who had never even heard of Glendening until he started running for governor.
NEWS
By William F. Zorzi Jr. and William F. Zorzi Jr.,Sun Staff Writer | July 26, 1994
State Sen. American Joe Miedusiewski is attacking again.In the latest of a series of hard-hitting radio ads, Mr. Miedusiewski lampoons the front-running Democratic candidate for governor, Parris N. Glendening, suggesting that he was the Barney Fife of law enforcement.The radio spot, which begins airing today statewide for eight days, spoofs Mr. Glendening's days as a Hyattsville councilman in 1973 and 1974, when he also served as police commissioner, overseeing a department that numbered 20 at the time.
FEATURES
By Joyce Millman and Joyce Millman,San Francisco Examiner | October 19, 1993
Baby boomers used to believe that life ended at 30. Then, thanks to TV, life began at thirtysomething. Now, with the TV generation clocking in at 40 and beyond, and apprehensively dealing with their own kids' surly teenhood, the tube has once again come through with a boomer fountain of youth.It's called aging parents. Prime time is filled these days with 40-year-old adolescents still rebelling against Mom and Dad.On ABC's "Roseanne," Roseanne Connor has one daughter who eloped at 18, another who has the disposition of Wednesday Addams and a 12-year-old son who has just started skipping school.
NEWS
July 27, 1994
Who would have suspected that a nondescript backbencher in Annapolis, a regular in the ward-heeling politics of ethnic Baltimore, would be running second in the polls in the Democratic primary for governor?Few gave American Joe Miedusiewski a chance when he declared his intentions last year. Common wisdom held that by the filing deadline, he'd be running for reelection as a state senator or agree to run as lieutenant governor on someone else's ticket. Conventional wisdom was wrong.Mr. Miedusiewski has emerged as the Baltimore region's foremost contender in the Democratic primary.
NEWS
July 28, 1994
Call him the surprise of this year's gubernatorial campaign. Call him No. 2 in the most recent polls. Just call him Joe.His legal name is American Joe Miedusiewski, a real mouthful. He changed it in court to take advantage of his father's popular East Baltimore tavern, American Joe's, when he first ran for office. Then it was a decided plus. Now, the name strikes many voters as just too blue-collar Bawlamer, hon. Especially for a guy running for governor.And yet, Mr. Miedusiewski has stunned his opponents with a well-crafted campaign that has hit a chord with many citizens.
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