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By Doreen Carvajal and Doreen Carvajal,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 15, 2001
MERION, Pa. - For decades the idiosyncratic Barnes Foundation has dazzled select visitors with an exquisite collection of Cezannes, Renoirs and Matisses displayed in suburban isolation in a limestone Main Line mansion here, about 10 miles from Philadelphia's center. But behind the scenes, wealthy art patrons are aligning themselves behind a once heretical notion to move the collection into the city if the struggling foundation cannot attract a latter-day Medici to save itself from financial ruin.
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FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | March 17, 2005
Early in Thomas Gibbons' Permanent Collection, we learn that the paintings in the collection at the heart of the play were hung in a manner their eccentric collector hoped would teach visitors "how to see." But the embattled characters in this play - inspired by controversies surrounding Philadelphia's Barnes Foundation - rarely see eye to eye about anything. The obstacle obscuring their vision is race, and to a large degree, Permanent Collection is a play based more on issues than plot or character development.
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FEATURES
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 16, 2003
After years of wrangling, a major step has been taken toward moving the quirky Barnes Foundation and its fabled collection of Impressionist and Post-Impressionist art from a cozy Philadelphia suburb to an urban site near the Philadelphia Museum of Art. The foundation announced on Friday that the executive committee of Lincoln University, a historically black school that nominates four of the five Barnes board members, agreed to support the move....
NEWS
By Mike Boehm and Diane Haithman and Mike Boehm and Diane Haithman,LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 14, 2004
In a case watched for its possible impact on philanthropy, a Pennsylvania judge ruled yesterday that art intended to stay put - the treasured, highly idiosyncratic but deficit-ridden Barnes Foundation collection - can be uprooted despite the terms of the donor's bequest. The decision opens the way for the cloistered collection amassed by pharmaceutical tycoon Albert C. Barnes to be moved from suburban Merion, Pa., and housed in a more conventional $100 million showplace in downtown Philadelphia.
NEWS
By Mike Boehm and Diane Haithman and Mike Boehm and Diane Haithman,LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 14, 2004
In a case watched for its possible impact on philanthropy, a Pennsylvania judge ruled yesterday that art intended to stay put - the treasured, highly idiosyncratic but deficit-ridden Barnes Foundation collection - can be uprooted despite the terms of the donor's bequest. The decision opens the way for the cloistered collection amassed by pharmaceutical tycoon Albert C. Barnes to be moved from suburban Merion, Pa., and housed in a more conventional $100 million showplace in downtown Philadelphia.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Sun Art Critic | February 1, 1995
An exhibit of 84 paintings from the Barnes Foundation that has been seen by millions of people on a triumphant two-year world tour opened at the Philadelphia Museum of Art yesterday. It offers the last chance to see these masterpieces before they return to the foundation, presumably forever.Dr. Albert Barnes, who died in 1951, amassed one of the most stupendous collections of modern art in the world. In sheer numbers, it's staggering: 180 Renoirs, 69 Cezannes, 60 Matisses, 44 Picassos, seven van Goghs and works by Toulouse-Lautrec, Seurat, Manet, Monet, Gauguin, Rousseau, Modigliani and others.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Vera Eidelman and Vera Eidelman,SUN STAFF | August 12, 2004
Walking along tree-lined North Latch's Lane in Merion, Pa., you wouldn't expect to find much. Sure, the houses are pretty and the grass is lush, but there's nowhere to eat nearby, except the occasional Wendy's and definitely nowhere to shop, unless you're in the mood for 7-Eleven. It's minutes, and worlds, away from Philadelphia. If you walk far enough, though, you'll find the Barnes Foundation, home to more than 3,800 displayed works of art (another 5,000-6,000 are in storage) and an arboretum.
FEATURES
By Jean Allen and Jean Allen,SUN-SENTINEL, SOUTH FLORIDA | November 9, 1997
Many years ago, our family enjoyed a visit to Bok Tower in central Florida. I have never forgotten how beautiful the tower and surrounding grounds are. I would like to visit again, preferably at a time when there are a lot of carillon concerts. I'll welcome any help.Bok Tower is a beauty, 205 feet of coquina stone and pink marble. The carillon has 57 bronze bells weighing from 17 pounds to an 11-ton whopper. The tower sits at the summit of the Florida peninsula's tallest hill, Iron Mountain, elevation 298 feet.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | March 17, 2005
Early in Thomas Gibbons' Permanent Collection, we learn that the paintings in the collection at the heart of the play were hung in a manner their eccentric collector hoped would teach visitors "how to see." But the embattled characters in this play - inspired by controversies surrounding Philadelphia's Barnes Foundation - rarely see eye to eye about anything. The obstacle obscuring their vision is race, and to a large degree, Permanent Collection is a play based more on issues than plot or character development.
NEWS
By JOHN DORSEY and JOHN DORSEY,SUN ART CRITIC | December 17, 1995
They spent $12 million to make the place look just the same. Fortunately.The Barnes Foundation of Merion, Pa., home of one of the world's greatest private art collections, has reopened after an almost three-year renovation of its gallery building. During the renovation, 80 of its greatest works made a world tour that was seen by 5 million people and earned the foundation $17 million. The money has been used to fund the renovation.Now the public can once more see the building's staggering holdings -- 2,500 works of art; everything from African sculpture to antique furniture to a collection of 800 paintings including the modern masterpieces that inhabit the walls in scarcely believable profusion.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Vera Eidelman and Vera Eidelman,SUN STAFF | August 12, 2004
Walking along tree-lined North Latch's Lane in Merion, Pa., you wouldn't expect to find much. Sure, the houses are pretty and the grass is lush, but there's nowhere to eat nearby, except the occasional Wendy's and definitely nowhere to shop, unless you're in the mood for 7-Eleven. It's minutes, and worlds, away from Philadelphia. If you walk far enough, though, you'll find the Barnes Foundation, home to more than 3,800 displayed works of art (another 5,000-6,000 are in storage) and an arboretum.
FEATURES
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 16, 2003
After years of wrangling, a major step has been taken toward moving the quirky Barnes Foundation and its fabled collection of Impressionist and Post-Impressionist art from a cozy Philadelphia suburb to an urban site near the Philadelphia Museum of Art. The foundation announced on Friday that the executive committee of Lincoln University, a historically black school that nominates four of the five Barnes board members, agreed to support the move....
NEWS
By Doreen Carvajal and Doreen Carvajal,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 15, 2001
MERION, Pa. - For decades the idiosyncratic Barnes Foundation has dazzled select visitors with an exquisite collection of Cezannes, Renoirs and Matisses displayed in suburban isolation in a limestone Main Line mansion here, about 10 miles from Philadelphia's center. But behind the scenes, wealthy art patrons are aligning themselves behind a once heretical notion to move the collection into the city if the struggling foundation cannot attract a latter-day Medici to save itself from financial ruin.
FEATURES
By Jean Allen and Jean Allen,SUN-SENTINEL, SOUTH FLORIDA | November 9, 1997
Many years ago, our family enjoyed a visit to Bok Tower in central Florida. I have never forgotten how beautiful the tower and surrounding grounds are. I would like to visit again, preferably at a time when there are a lot of carillon concerts. I'll welcome any help.Bok Tower is a beauty, 205 feet of coquina stone and pink marble. The carillon has 57 bronze bells weighing from 17 pounds to an 11-ton whopper. The tower sits at the summit of the Florida peninsula's tallest hill, Iron Mountain, elevation 298 feet.
NEWS
By JOHN DORSEY and JOHN DORSEY,SUN ART CRITIC | December 17, 1995
They spent $12 million to make the place look just the same. Fortunately.The Barnes Foundation of Merion, Pa., home of one of the world's greatest private art collections, has reopened after an almost three-year renovation of its gallery building. During the renovation, 80 of its greatest works made a world tour that was seen by 5 million people and earned the foundation $17 million. The money has been used to fund the renovation.Now the public can once more see the building's staggering holdings -- 2,500 works of art; everything from African sculpture to antique furniture to a collection of 800 paintings including the modern masterpieces that inhabit the walls in scarcely believable profusion.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Sun Art Critic | February 1, 1995
An exhibit of 84 paintings from the Barnes Foundation that has been seen by millions of people on a triumphant two-year world tour opened at the Philadelphia Museum of Art yesterday. It offers the last chance to see these masterpieces before they return to the foundation, presumably forever.Dr. Albert Barnes, who died in 1951, amassed one of the most stupendous collections of modern art in the world. In sheer numbers, it's staggering: 180 Renoirs, 69 Cezannes, 60 Matisses, 44 Picassos, seven van Goghs and works by Toulouse-Lautrec, Seurat, Manet, Monet, Gauguin, Rousseau, Modigliani and others.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 12, 2004
EATS Sun Moon & Stars, in a sterile Owings Mills office park, could have been a run-of-the-mill deli, but instead, most dishes offer remarkable flavor. Page 15 FAMILY What better way to end a Sunday drive than with ice cream? Check out LIVE's guide to some places that offer fresh, homemade and positively addictive treats that are worth the trip. Page 18 STAGE The Phantom of the Opera star Gary Mauer takes on the title role in the national tour after playing the role of Raoul on Broadway.
NEWS
October 25, 2006
Marjorie S. Dawson, a homemaker and avid gardener, died of liver cancer Sunday at her Rodgers Forge home. She was 82. She was born Marjorie Stelwagon and raised in Merion, Pa., and graduated from Merion High School in 1942. She studied landscape design at the Arboretum School of the Barnes Foundation, which was founded by Albert C. Barnes in 1922 in Lower Merion Township. Pa., and at Longwood Gardens in Kennett Square, Pa. She was married in 1957 to Charles S. Dawson Sr., a clinical research associate with Wyeth Pharmaceutical Co. in Philadelphia, and moved to the Hampton section of Baltimore County in 1974.
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