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NEWS
October 21, 2006
Jean M. Ortgies, a retired elementary school teacher and former Linthicum resident, died Sunday at a Woodstock, Va., nursing home after suffering a fall earlier in the month. She was 98. Born Jean Cameron Mathewson in New York, she earned a bachelor's degree from Barnard College. She later attended the University of Maryland, College Park. She moved to Linthicum in 1948 and taught at Linthicum Elementary School for 17 years. She later lived at the Charlestown retirement community. Mrs. Ortgies had been a member of the Linthicum Women's Club, Kappa Delta Phi sorority, the League of Women Voters and the Barnard College Alumni Association.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
Susan Reimer | May 28, 2012
Commencement season is the college equivalent of the White House Correspondents' Dinner. Institutions from the Ivy League to the local community college scramble to lure the shiniest star they can to their podiums on graduation day. And the match-ups often make about as much sense as inviting Lindsay Lohan to be your date for an event that celebrates heavyweights in the news media. It helps if one of your alumni has actually made it big and is willing to come back to campus and tell graduates that it is up to them to make the world a better place.
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NEWS
July 21, 2006
Martha E. Peterson, 90, president of Barnard College in the turbulent Vietnam War era who went on hold the same position at Beloit College in Wisconsin, died July 14 at her home in Madison, Wis. Miss Peterson was known for fostering calm at Barnard's campus in the Morningside Heights section of Manhattan during the late 1960s and early 1970s, when student demonstrations roiled the neighboring campus of Columbia University. President of Barnard from 1967 to 1975, she said shortly after her appointment: "I'm not alarmed by student demonstrations.
NEWS
October 21, 2006
Jean M. Ortgies, a retired elementary school teacher and former Linthicum resident, died Sunday at a Woodstock, Va., nursing home after suffering a fall earlier in the month. She was 98. Born Jean Cameron Mathewson in New York, she earned a bachelor's degree from Barnard College. She later attended the University of Maryland, College Park. She moved to Linthicum in 1948 and taught at Linthicum Elementary School for 17 years. She later lived at the Charlestown retirement community. Mrs. Ortgies had been a member of the Linthicum Women's Club, Kappa Delta Phi sorority, the League of Women Voters and the Barnard College Alumni Association.
NEWS
By Mona Charen | October 28, 2002
WASHINGTON -- Tomorrow, that bastion of feminism (and for what it's worth, my alma mater), Barnard College, will host a conference on motherhood. Don't yawn. This is news. When I was a student at Barnard 20-odd years ago, the wish to become a mother was something one only whispered about. To admit such a thing openly was to mark yourself as a reactionary. The point of the women's movement, we were given to understand, was to free women from all that. Volumes of feminist literature detailed the drudgery, boredom and depression motherhood inevitably entailed.
NEWS
By Elizabeth Pachoda and Elizabeth Pachoda,special to the sun | March 16, 1997
"The Journey Home," by Joyce Antler. The Free Press. 385 pages. $27.50.A wise woman once said, "History happens to you while you're doing the dishes." But that's only part of the story because after history knocks on the kitchen door, women, anchored in the important routines of the everyday, have been uniquely prepared to step out into the theater of history and make a difference.The line about history and dishes belongs to the writer/activist Grace Paley, who knew why kitchen life might lead a woman to found a settlement house or march against "wars men plan for their sons."
NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,SUN STAFF | October 1, 1995
It was 60 years ago that a group of young Girl Scouts from Baltimore first went to Camp Whippoorwill on the shores of the Magothy River in Anne Arundel County. The girls, then 10 or so years old, paid $19 for two weeks of camping, eating, swimming, hiking and boating.But, as many are recalling this weekend, they also cemented lifelong friendships and began to develop the beliefs and values that would guide them in their personal and professional lives.Starting Friday afternoon, through yesterday and continuing today, 25 of the former Scouts are back at Camp Whippoorwill for -- in any aspect of life -- a rare 60th reunion.
NEWS
April 26, 2004
Frances Rafferty, 81, a pouty glamour girl in B movies of the 1940s and television shows of the 1950s who is best remembered as Spring Byingtons daughter in the long-running sitcom December Bride, died April 18 in Paso Robles, Calif. The actress largely retired from the large and small screens in 1961 after the brief run of a December Bride spinoff, Pete and Gladys, starring Harry Morgan. She continued to play occasional roles on such series as The Streets of San Francisco into the 1970s, but devoted much of her later years to raising quarter horses.
NEWS
Susan Reimer | May 28, 2012
Commencement season is the college equivalent of the White House Correspondents' Dinner. Institutions from the Ivy League to the local community college scramble to lure the shiniest star they can to their podiums on graduation day. And the match-ups often make about as much sense as inviting Lindsay Lohan to be your date for an event that celebrates heavyweights in the news media. It helps if one of your alumni has actually made it big and is willing to come back to campus and tell graduates that it is up to them to make the world a better place.
SPORTS
By Kevin Van Valkenburg and Kevin Van Valkenburg,SUN STAFF | August 26, 2003
COLLEGE PARK -- It's not always easy for a punter to win the respect of his teammates, so Maryland coach Ralph Friedgen devised a foolproof method this preseason for second-year freshman Adam Podlesh. He'd stick Podlesh and the punt team on their 1-yard line, bring an all-out rush at them, and tell Podlesh if he didn't kick the ball to the 50-yard line, the whole team would have to run as punishment. "It's a way to make friends quickly," Friedgen said with a grin. For the most part, Podlesh, a native of Pittsford, N.Y., has passed the test heading into Thursday's season opener against Northern Illinois.
NEWS
July 21, 2006
Martha E. Peterson, 90, president of Barnard College in the turbulent Vietnam War era who went on hold the same position at Beloit College in Wisconsin, died July 14 at her home in Madison, Wis. Miss Peterson was known for fostering calm at Barnard's campus in the Morningside Heights section of Manhattan during the late 1960s and early 1970s, when student demonstrations roiled the neighboring campus of Columbia University. President of Barnard from 1967 to 1975, she said shortly after her appointment: "I'm not alarmed by student demonstrations.
NEWS
April 26, 2004
Frances Rafferty, 81, a pouty glamour girl in B movies of the 1940s and television shows of the 1950s who is best remembered as Spring Byingtons daughter in the long-running sitcom December Bride, died April 18 in Paso Robles, Calif. The actress largely retired from the large and small screens in 1961 after the brief run of a December Bride spinoff, Pete and Gladys, starring Harry Morgan. She continued to play occasional roles on such series as The Streets of San Francisco into the 1970s, but devoted much of her later years to raising quarter horses.
SPORTS
By Kevin Van Valkenburg and Kevin Van Valkenburg,SUN STAFF | August 26, 2003
COLLEGE PARK -- It's not always easy for a punter to win the respect of his teammates, so Maryland coach Ralph Friedgen devised a foolproof method this preseason for second-year freshman Adam Podlesh. He'd stick Podlesh and the punt team on their 1-yard line, bring an all-out rush at them, and tell Podlesh if he didn't kick the ball to the 50-yard line, the whole team would have to run as punishment. "It's a way to make friends quickly," Friedgen said with a grin. For the most part, Podlesh, a native of Pittsford, N.Y., has passed the test heading into Thursday's season opener against Northern Illinois.
NEWS
By Mona Charen | October 28, 2002
WASHINGTON -- Tomorrow, that bastion of feminism (and for what it's worth, my alma mater), Barnard College, will host a conference on motherhood. Don't yawn. This is news. When I was a student at Barnard 20-odd years ago, the wish to become a mother was something one only whispered about. To admit such a thing openly was to mark yourself as a reactionary. The point of the women's movement, we were given to understand, was to free women from all that. Volumes of feminist literature detailed the drudgery, boredom and depression motherhood inevitably entailed.
NEWS
By Elizabeth Pachoda and Elizabeth Pachoda,special to the sun | March 16, 1997
"The Journey Home," by Joyce Antler. The Free Press. 385 pages. $27.50.A wise woman once said, "History happens to you while you're doing the dishes." But that's only part of the story because after history knocks on the kitchen door, women, anchored in the important routines of the everyday, have been uniquely prepared to step out into the theater of history and make a difference.The line about history and dishes belongs to the writer/activist Grace Paley, who knew why kitchen life might lead a woman to found a settlement house or march against "wars men plan for their sons."
NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,SUN STAFF | October 1, 1995
It was 60 years ago that a group of young Girl Scouts from Baltimore first went to Camp Whippoorwill on the shores of the Magothy River in Anne Arundel County. The girls, then 10 or so years old, paid $19 for two weeks of camping, eating, swimming, hiking and boating.But, as many are recalling this weekend, they also cemented lifelong friendships and began to develop the beliefs and values that would guide them in their personal and professional lives.Starting Friday afternoon, through yesterday and continuing today, 25 of the former Scouts are back at Camp Whippoorwill for -- in any aspect of life -- a rare 60th reunion.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Meredith Lidard | October 21, 2004
Barbie through the ages Barbie, the multifaceted and successful 11.5-inch woman, is being scrutinized Tuesday by Kristina Milnor in "Barbie as Grecian Goddess and Egyptian Queen: Women's History by Mattel," presented by the Library of Congress. Milnor, a professor at Barnard College, discusses the "Great Eras Collection" that Mattel released from 1993 to 1997. She uses illustrated examples to dissect Mattel's marketing strategy and representation of women in the past in a series that was packaged as an educational tool for adult collectors.
NEWS
March 24, 2006
Marguerite "Murgo" VerKruzen, a retired professor and former assistant director of women's athletics at what is now Towson University, died from complications of a stroke March 17 at Manor Care Ruxton. She was 89. Born and raised in Mamaroneck, N.Y., Miss VerKruzen earned her bachelor's degree in 1939 from Barnard College and a master's degree in physical education from Wellesley College in 1941. She taught at Larson Junior College in New Haven, Conn., Lindenwold College in St. Louis, and Chatham College in Pittsburgh, Pa., before joining the old Towson State faculty in 1962.
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