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BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,SUN STAFF | November 8, 2003
A Boston investment group plans to revive the defunct Baltimore Marine Industries Inc. shipyard in Sparrows Point, creating up to 1,500 jobs over the next three years and using the 250-acre waterfront facility to its full capacity to build barges and repair and build light ships. Robert Willis, a principal with Barletta Willis LLC , said the new owner plans to restart operations at the former Bethlehem Steel shipyard by April, employing 300 to 500 workers in the first year alone. It expects to begin with work on barges.
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BUSINESS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,Sun reporter | December 29, 2007
A civil court case filed last month in U.S. District Court in Baltimore - alleging racketeering by Sparrows Point shipyard owner Vincent F. Barletta and others - has been settled for an undisclosed amount, according to the plaintiff's attorney. The suit was filed by ship-breaking company Clean Venture Inc., which had won a $750,000 judgment earlier from the North American Ship Recycling company, or NASR, where Barletta was a vice president. NASR disappeared from its Sparrows Point location before the judgment - money owed for contracting work - was paid, leading Clean Venture to sue Barletta along with his brother, their attorney, multiple colleagues and affiliated businesses.
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BUSINESS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,SUN REPORTER | November 20, 2007
Vincent F. Barletta, the Massachusetts owner of Sparrows Point shipyard, and certain affiliates have two weeks to answer racketeering claims filed against them last week in Baltimore's U.S. District Court. If they don't, the defendants face a default judgment of up to $2.25 million, according to court documents. The civil lawsuit, filed by Clean Venture Inc. on Nov. 13, claims that at least some of the defendants took up to $750,000 that was owed to the New Jersey ship-breaking company.
BUSINESS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,SUN REPORTER | November 20, 2007
Vincent F. Barletta, the Massachusetts owner of Sparrows Point shipyard, and certain affiliates have two weeks to answer racketeering claims filed against them last week in Baltimore's U.S. District Court. If they don't, the defendants face a default judgment of up to $2.25 million, according to court documents. The civil lawsuit, filed by Clean Venture Inc. on Nov. 13, claims that at least some of the defendants took up to $750,000 that was owed to the New Jersey ship-breaking company.
BUSINESS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,Sun reporter | December 29, 2007
A civil court case filed last month in U.S. District Court in Baltimore - alleging racketeering by Sparrows Point shipyard owner Vincent F. Barletta and others - has been settled for an undisclosed amount, according to the plaintiff's attorney. The suit was filed by ship-breaking company Clean Venture Inc., which had won a $750,000 judgment earlier from the North American Ship Recycling company, or NASR, where Barletta was a vice president. NASR disappeared from its Sparrows Point location before the judgment - money owed for contracting work - was paid, leading Clean Venture to sue Barletta along with his brother, their attorney, multiple colleagues and affiliated businesses.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,Sun reporter | November 2, 2007
North American Ship Recycling Inc., which just a few years ago was heralded as the key to revitalizing the Sparrows Point shipyard, has disappeared, leaving behind in Maryland waters two rotting and possibly toxic government ships, according to federal officials. NASR was supposed to dismantle the ships - the Sphinx and the Hoist - under agreements made this year with the U.S. Maritime Administration. A security guard said yesterday that NASR was no longer at the shipyard, and that he didn't know where the company had gone.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,SUN STAFF | June 18, 2004
The defunct Sparrows Point shipyard reopened yesterday to celebratory speeches, a banjo-strumming band and tours in air-conditioned buses, but manufacturing and repair work at the 250-acre former Bethlehem Steel yard won't start until fall at the earliest, the new owners said. Boston-based Barletta Willis Investments bought the Baltimore County shipyard in early March for $9.75 million and plans to redevelop it as a vast industrial park, leasing space to barge building and ship repair companies and other businesses.
NEWS
By JULIE BYKOWICZ and JULIE BYKOWICZ,SUN REPORTER | July 9, 2006
HAZLETON, Pa. -- Flags in green, white and red, the colors of Mexico, welcome shoppers at one of this small city's newest convenience stores, where the shelves are stocked with dried peppers and corn husks and dotted with handwritten "especial!" signs. With a Latino immigrant population that has swelled almost tenfold since 2000, Hazleton was a natural place for Kimberly Lopez, a Pennsylvania native, and her husband, Ruddy Lopez, a Mexican immigrant, to open their store, their dream, four months ago. Their timing couldn't have been worse, they say. Last month, Mayor Lou Barletta proposed an ordinance that targets the city's illegal immigrants - and offends, some Hispanic community leaders say, the city's thousands of legal immigrants.
BUSINESS
By Meredith Cohn and Meredith Cohn,SUN STAFF | March 6, 2004
A Boston partnership officially closed yesterday on its purchase of the defunct Sparrows Point shipyard in southeast Baltimore County and expects to begin moving in a variety of tenants next month. Barletta Willis Investments, a partnership between Vincent Barletta, the president of a Boston heavy construction firm, the Barletta Co., and Boston venture capitalist Robert Willis, paid $11.9 million for the 250-acre shipyard, including about 1 million square feet of buildings, and equipment, Willis said yesterday.
BUSINESS
By Paul Adams and Paul Adams,SUN STAFF | September 14, 2004
The investment partnership trying to revitalize the defunct Sparrows Point shipyard has won a $2.3 million federal contract to break two retired Navy reserve cargo ships into scrap in what the new owners hope is just the initial installment of an ambitious plan to bring hundreds of workers back to a historic waterfront industrial site in Baltimore County. North American Ship Recycling, a subsidiary of Boston-based Barletta Willis LLC, won the contract as part of the U.S. Maritime Administration's efforts to scrap dozens of rusting ships mothballed on the James River in Virginia.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,Sun reporter | November 2, 2007
North American Ship Recycling Inc., which just a few years ago was heralded as the key to revitalizing the Sparrows Point shipyard, has disappeared, leaving behind in Maryland waters two rotting and possibly toxic government ships, according to federal officials. NASR was supposed to dismantle the ships - the Sphinx and the Hoist - under agreements made this year with the U.S. Maritime Administration. A security guard said yesterday that NASR was no longer at the shipyard, and that he didn't know where the company had gone.
NEWS
By Laura Barnhardt and Laura Barnhardt,sun reporter | December 19, 2006
A Baltimore County judge ordered yesterday the owners of the Sparrows Point shipyard to temporarily stop dredging in the Patapsco River. Circuit Court Judge Dana M. Levitz granted a temporary injunction to stop contractors from removing sediment in the river near the Key Bridge at the request of a group of Dundalk-area residents also opposed to a liquefied natural gas terminal planned for the site, according to a lawyer for the group. The Greater Dundalk Alliance's LNG opposition team alleges in its court filing that the dredging is stirring up toxins that will harm nearby residents and the Chesapeake Bay. The community group, however, must post a $750,000 bond by today to cover the company's revenue lost by not dredging, in the event that the contractors are allowed to resume the work.
NEWS
By ELLEN BARRY and ELLEN BARRY,LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 16, 2006
Since July, when Hazleton, Pa., passed an ordinance aimed at making it "one the most difficult places in America for illegal immigrants," dozens of communities have picked up on the idea, saying that local governments must find ways to expel illegal immigrants. Already, laws have been passed in a handful of places. In Valley Park, Mo., population 6,518, landlords over the weekend began evicting tenants who are not legal citizens. In Riverside, N.J., immigrant families departed so quickly that they left their furniture.
NEWS
By JULIE BYKOWICZ and JULIE BYKOWICZ,SUN REPORTER | July 9, 2006
HAZLETON, Pa. -- Flags in green, white and red, the colors of Mexico, welcome shoppers at one of this small city's newest convenience stores, where the shelves are stocked with dried peppers and corn husks and dotted with handwritten "especial!" signs. With a Latino immigrant population that has swelled almost tenfold since 2000, Hazleton was a natural place for Kimberly Lopez, a Pennsylvania native, and her husband, Ruddy Lopez, a Mexican immigrant, to open their store, their dream, four months ago. Their timing couldn't have been worse, they say. Last month, Mayor Lou Barletta proposed an ordinance that targets the city's illegal immigrants - and offends, some Hispanic community leaders say, the city's thousands of legal immigrants.
NEWS
By ANDREW A. GREEN and ANDREW A. GREEN,SUN REPORTER | June 7, 2006
Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr.'s personal lawyer met with Baltimore County officials to promote the development of a liquefied natural gas terminal in Sparrows Point and attempted to soften County Executive James T. Smith Jr.'s public opposition to the plan, documents released yesterday show. Ehrlich, who opposes the LNG facility, has publicly defended his lawyer and longtime friend, David Hamilton, saying during an appearance on WBAL radio last month that Hamilton "does not represent this firm that wants to put an LNG plant in Dundalk."
BUSINESS
By Paul Adams and Paul Adams,SUN STAFF | September 14, 2004
The investment partnership trying to revitalize the defunct Sparrows Point shipyard has won a $2.3 million federal contract to break two retired Navy reserve cargo ships into scrap in what the new owners hope is just the initial installment of an ambitious plan to bring hundreds of workers back to a historic waterfront industrial site in Baltimore County. North American Ship Recycling, a subsidiary of Boston-based Barletta Willis LLC, won the contract as part of the U.S. Maritime Administration's efforts to scrap dozens of rusting ships mothballed on the James River in Virginia.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,SUN STAFF | February 22, 2004
The buyers of the defunct Sparrows Point shipyard plan to redevelop the 250-acre facility at Baltimore County's southeast corner into a vast industrial park, leasing space to barge building and ship repair companies as well as other businesses. Barletta Willis Investments, a partnership between Vincent Barletta, the president of Boston-based heavy construction firm The Barletta Co. and Boston venture capitalist Robert Willis, 35, is set to close on the $9.75 million deal this week to buy the sprawling shipyard, operated at its peak by Bethlehem Steel Corp.
NEWS
By ANDREW A. GREEN and ANDREW A. GREEN,SUN REPORTER | June 7, 2006
Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr.'s personal lawyer met with Baltimore County officials to promote the development of a liquefied natural gas terminal in Sparrows Point and attempted to soften County Executive James T. Smith Jr.'s public opposition to the plan, documents released yesterday show. Ehrlich, who opposes the LNG facility, has publicly defended his lawyer and longtime friend, David Hamilton, saying during an appearance on WBAL radio last month that Hamilton "does not represent this firm that wants to put an LNG plant in Dundalk."
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,SUN STAFF | June 18, 2004
The defunct Sparrows Point shipyard reopened yesterday to celebratory speeches, a banjo-strumming band and tours in air-conditioned buses, but manufacturing and repair work at the 250-acre former Bethlehem Steel yard won't start until fall at the earliest, the new owners said. Boston-based Barletta Willis Investments bought the Baltimore County shipyard in early March for $9.75 million and plans to redevelop it as a vast industrial park, leasing space to barge building and ship repair companies and other businesses.
BUSINESS
By Meredith Cohn and Meredith Cohn,SUN STAFF | March 6, 2004
A Boston partnership officially closed yesterday on its purchase of the defunct Sparrows Point shipyard in southeast Baltimore County and expects to begin moving in a variety of tenants next month. Barletta Willis Investments, a partnership between Vincent Barletta, the president of a Boston heavy construction firm, the Barletta Co., and Boston venture capitalist Robert Willis, paid $11.9 million for the 250-acre shipyard, including about 1 million square feet of buildings, and equipment, Willis said yesterday.
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