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Bariatric Surgery

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By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | July 11, 2012
Often, those who are very overweight have tried dieting for years before giving up in frustration. But more obese people are turning to bariatric surgery to jump-start their weight-loss programs. The surgery is low-risk but isn't for everyone. It requires a commitment to other lifestyle changes. But it can have many health benefits, according to Dr. Cynthia Long, advanced laparoscopic and bariatric surgeon at Sinai Hospital. Can you describe the different types of bariatric surgery?
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NEWS
March 14, 2014
Wellness classes Howard County General Hospital will sponsor the following wellness classes. The classes are held at the HCGH Wellness Center, 10710 Charter Drive, Suite 100, Columbia, unless otherwise listed. Online registration at hcgh.org is advised for all programs. Information: 410-740-7601. •Prenatal classes for early pregnancy. Parents-to-be and those in the first trimesters are invited to attend this class from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. Wednesday, March 19. •Care by certified nurse midwives.
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FEATURES
By Holly Selby | October 25, 2007
An estimated 66 percent of adults in the United States are overweight or obese, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Although doctors recommend that those who wish to lose weight first try to do so through dieting, exercise, behavior therapy and anti-obesity drugs, an increasing number of people are turning to surgery when these steps fail. In 2006, for example, about 150,000 patients in the United States underwent what is known as bariatric surgery, says Michael Schweitzer, director of minimally invasive bariatric surgery at Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | September 16, 2012
Days after undergoing gastric bypass surgery, Brenda Maker's diabetes was gone — her body producing enough of the hormone insulin to turn sugar into fuel. It's a phenomenon seen in recent years by doctors who increasingly are using the operation not only to help patients lose weight and improve their health generally but specifically to address the national epidemic of Type 2 diabetes. Now some researchers at the University of Maryland believe their work may explain why the surgery succeeds, and how a common drug may be used to induce similar effects.
NEWS
September 2, 2007
Upper Chesapeake Health is offering a free informational class, "Bariatric Surgery: New Course for Life," at 5:30 p.m. Tuesday in the Havre de Grace Room at Harford Memorial Hospital. Participants can learn from the staff of Upper Chesapeake Bariatric Surgery whether this procedure is right for them. A monthly support group for people who have had the surgery will meet after the class at 7 p.m. Information: 800-515-0044. Cancer support offered in group Upper Chesapeake Medical Center will hold a "Man to Man Prostate Support Group" at 7 p.m. Wednesday in the Fallston Room.
NEWS
By Judy Foreman and Judy Foreman,Sun Columnist | January 5, 2007
Should I consider bariatric surgery to control Type 2 diabetes? Yes, if you are significantly obese and have tried and failed to lose weight through diet and exercise. Obesity is a major contributor to Type 2 diabetes, in which the hormone insulin becomes less effective at its job, escorting sugar into cells; weight loss is the best way to control diabetes. For people who can't lose enough weight through diet and exercise, bariatric surgery is an increasingly popular option; the number of such surgeries has quadrupled since 2000, reaching 177,600 this year, according to the American Society for Bariatric Surgery.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | September 16, 2012
Days after undergoing gastric bypass surgery, Brenda Maker's diabetes was gone — her body producing enough of the hormone insulin to turn sugar into fuel. It's a phenomenon seen in recent years by doctors who increasingly are using the operation not only to help patients lose weight and improve their health generally but specifically to address the national epidemic of Type 2 diabetes. Now some researchers at the University of Maryland believe their work may explain why the surgery succeeds, and how a common drug may be used to induce similar effects.
NEWS
July 30, 2006
Class set for Aug. 19 on bariatric surgery Upper Chesapeake Health will offer a free informational class entitled "Bariatric Surgery: New Course For Life" at 5:30 p.m. Aug. 8 in the Havre de Grace Room at Harford Memorial Hospital. The class will enable participants to determine whether bariatric surgery is right for them. Members of the Upper Chesapeake Bariatric Surgery staff present the classes. Information: 410-800-515-0044. Breast cancer fundraiser Aug. 19 Dinah Seisman, independent branch adviser for Longaberger Basket Co. and other associates, will sponsor a Breast Cancer Awareness Luncheon Hope Gathering from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Aug. 19 at Trinity Lutheran Church, 1100 Philadelphia Road, Joppa.
NEWS
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | July 11, 2012
Often, those who are very overweight have tried dieting for years before giving up in frustration. But more obese people are turning to bariatric surgery to jump-start their weight-loss programs. The surgery is low-risk but isn't for everyone. It requires a commitment to other lifestyle changes. But it can have many health benefits, according to Dr. Cynthia Long, advanced laparoscopic and bariatric surgeon at Sinai Hospital. Can you describe the different types of bariatric surgery?
NEWS
By Jill Rosen, The Baltimore Sun | November 24, 2010
When Shelby Saum first met Joseph Ayers through a game-playing club, neither one of them had a weight problem. But the Hampden couple sure did 12 years and three children later. There they were last year, Shelby, 35 and an Army contractor, inching toward 300 pounds and hardly able to think about anything else. And Joe, 39 and managing operations for Direct TV, popping blood pressure pills and pulling up at drive-through windows. Joe simply ate too much and the wrong things.
NEWS
October 5, 2008
Diabetes support group to meet Upper Chesapeake Health will offer a Parish Nurse Diabetes Support Group at 9:30 a.m. Tuesday at the Aberdeen Senior Center. For information and to register, call 410-273-5666. 'Dining with Docs' to hold series of discussions Upper Chesapeake Health will hold "Dining with Docs" dinner, lecture and discussion programs at 5:30 p.m. in Upper Chesapeake Medical Center's Chesapeake Conference Center. Terrence Fullum, board certified in bariatric surgery, will discuss "New Course for Life Weight Loss Surgery" on Tuesday.
NEWS
May 4, 2008
The Father Martin's Ashley Children's Program is available to kids ages 7 to 12 who are facing addiction or alcoholism in their family. The 2008 program is Rainbow of Hope. The program meets from 8:45 a.m. to 3:15 p.m. the second Saturday of the month at 800 Tydings Lane, Havre de Grace. There is a small fee for the program, but scholarships are available for those in need. For information and to register for the program, call 800-799-HOPE, ext. 227. Informational class on bariatric surgery Upper Chesapeake Health is offering a free informational class on "Bariatric Surgery: New Course for Life" at 5:30 p.m. May 13 at Harford Memorial Hospital.
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