Advertisement
HomeCollectionsBargaining
IN THE NEWS

Bargaining

NEWS
January 6, 2011
The New York Times reported this week that, faced with growing budget deficits and restive taxpayers, elected officials in many states are pushing new legislation to limit the power of labor unions, particularly those representing government workers, in collective bargaining. These state officials, according to the Times report, are looking for ways to curb the salaries and pensions of government employees. We are told that in some states with Republican governors and Republican state house majorities, officials are seeking more far-reaching, structural changes that would weaken the bargaining power of unions, including private sector ones.
Advertisement
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck,SUN STAFF | September 19, 1995
Major League Baseball has a new chief labor negotiator, but there is no indication that the owners and players will forge a new collective bargaining agreement and end nearly three years of labor unrest.New York City labor relations commissioner Randy Levine is the latest point man for management, and he said yesterday that he is optimistic that he can be the missing link between the two polarized bargaining units."I'm always an optimist," Levine said by telephone conference call yesterday.
NEWS
By Jennifer McMenamin and Jennifer McMenamin,SUN STAFF | November 13, 2002
Just two months after the school board and teachers union reached agreement on a contract and even as some teachers at 12 Carroll County schools continue a work-to-rule job protest over pay and workload, both sides are gearing up for a new round of negotiations. With salaries and benefits locked in for the next two years, school board members are to appoint bargaining teams today to go back to the table and turn their attention to issues that are not compensation-related - a litany of potential topics that was greatly expanded this year by a collective bargaining bill passed in the spring and signed by Gov. Parris N. Glendening.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | June 21, 1996
WASHINGTON -- In a decision that could lead to more strikes and lockouts, the Supreme Court yesterday gave management in professional sports and many other industries broad power to set wages and other benefits if bargaining breaks down.The ruling, in a pro football case, could have its most visible impact on sports, where labor strife has intensified in recent years. But it reaches well beyond pro leagues: The decision defines law for private industries that employ four out of 10 U.S. workers.
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck,Sun Staff Writer | August 13, 1994
NEW YORK -- What's it going to take?The first day of the baseball strike passed without any significant change in the bargaining position of either side -- and there may be many more days just like it -- but the labor dispute that has fractured the 1994 season will end someday. When it does, the terms could look something like this:The players, who currently must wait six years for free agency, would get to enter the free market in half that time but would no longer be entitled to salary arbitration.
SPORTS
By Jon Morgan and Jon Morgan,Sun Staff Writer | December 23, 1994
Major-league baseball players may have one of the strongest unions in sports, but they will be tested as never before as they head into the unpredictable arena of legal combat without the antitrust protection other sports enjoy.Owners of the 28 major-league teams last night declared an impasse in their negotiations with the Major League Baseball Players Association and unilaterally imposed new work rules, including a cap on salaries that the players bitterly have opposed."What the owners have done is completely legal under labor law, but they have entered a vast and unchartered territory," said William B. Briggs, adjunct professor of law at Cornell University and an expert in sports law and labor relations.
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck,Sun Staff Writer | October 18, 1994
Former Labor Secretary William Usery has taken over the scheduling of the baseball labor negotiations and apparently will move the talks to Washington.Sources on both sides of the labor dispute indicated that the next bargaining session -- originally scheduled for today in New York -- will take place in Washington tomorrow, but it is not known whether all the negotiations will be held in the nation's capital.That would mesh with Usery's style of mediation. He has a reputation for keeping the bargaining units at the table for long hours, and may believe that moving both sides out of New York will raise the discomfort level to a point where they will be more receptive to a compromise.
SPORTS
By Phil Rogers and Phil Rogers,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 15, 2002
While Commissioner Bud Selig insists that efforts to eliminate the Montreal Expos and another franchise are more than a ploy, contraction could wind up as a bargaining chip in the ongoing negotiations between owners and players. Donald Fehr, executive director of the Major League Baseball Players Association, says contraction is still an issue that remains on the table. It is possible that management will agree to drop, or at least delay significantly, the effort to eliminate two of the 30 major-league franchises in exchange for concessions from the union on a luxury tax, which has become the key issue in the talks.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | January 10, 1995
SACRAMENTO, Calif. -- In less than a year, California's highly touted "three strikes, you're out" law has swamped courts and jails with mostly nonviolent offenders, is allowing some minor criminals to escape prison or prosecution completely, and has jailers turning convicts loose to make room for people awaiting trial, according to a study released last week.All of those problems had been predicted by critics before the legislature approved the popular measure in March, but those concerns were largely ignored.
SPORTS
November 20, 1998
NBA games lost yesterday: 8.Total games missed: 123.Earliest estimated date that season can start: Dec. 22.Negotiations: The sides will hold a formal bargaining session today. It will be the first time in more than three weeks that each side's full negotiating committee will be present.Projected player salary losses (through Dec. 22): $298 million.Today's best canceled game: Knicks at Clippers. On what was to be Los Angeles' only appearance on national TV, viewers would have had a chance to see No. 1 draft pick Michael Olowokandi while also hearing the cheers of transplanted New Yorkers drown out the Clips' faithful.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.