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NEWS
By Scott Wilson and Scott Wilson,SUN STAFF | March 3, 1996
As much as bleak financial forecasts or union demands, County Executive John G. Gary's reform agenda has hampered labor talks, adding a political dimension absent in past years.On Friday, the Republican administration declared an impasse with four employee unions representing 35 percent of the county's work force.Labor negotiators have requested salary and benefit increases ranging from 5.4 percent to 17.5 percent, according to county calculations. Mr. Gary has said the county cannot afford raises this year for any of the county's 3,500 employees.
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NEWS
By Arin Gencer and Arin Gencer,Sun Reporter | February 4, 2007
Carroll County's contract school employees could enter the 2007-2008 year with a 7 percent salary increase, if tentative agreements with five bargaining units are adopted. The pay raise was one of the points settled after a month of extended meetings between school officials and the bargaining units, which represent about 3,300 school employees including teachers, administrators, custodians, transportation and food-service staff, among others, said Stephen Guthrie, assistant superintendent of administration.
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NEWS
By Greg Garland and Greg Garland,SUN STAFF | September 15, 1998
A state employee union filed an unfair labor practice complaint against the Glendening administration yesterday, claiming the union's representatives have been improperly denied access to state agencies and workers.The Maryland Classified Employees Association filed the complaint with the state Department of Labor, Licensing and Regulation. MCEA officials said they have asked for a hearing before a neutral arbitrator.Although it is the oldest labor group representing state employees, MCEA lost in collective bargaining elections after Gov. Parris N. Glendening signed an executive order in May 1996 giving state employees limited collective bargaining rights.
NEWS
By Doug Donovan and Doug Donovan,SUN STAFF | September 12, 2004
The three-year contracts that the city's two firefighters unions grudgingly ratified last week may represent more than a measure of fiscal stability in the foreseeable future for Mayor Martin O'Malley's administration. The deals that gave union members 3 percent annual raises also handed the mayor what he most wanted from negotiations: health care concessions and long-term agreements to stabilize budget planning. And city officials hope that the police union and the two bargaining units for nonpublic safety workers will follow suit.
NEWS
By William F. Zorzi Jr. and William F. Zorzi Jr.,SUN STAFF | August 22, 1996
Only one union submitted petitions to the state yesterday showing it is eligible to take part in elections to represent state workers under a limited form of collective bargaining granted them by Gov. Parris N. Glendening.Under Glendening's executive order giving an estimated 40,000 state employees collective bargaining, yesterday was the first day competing unions could submit petitions to the state -- and the first step in a long, complicated process that will culminate in elections later this year or early next.
NEWS
By Arin Gencer and Arin Gencer,Sun Reporter | February 4, 2007
Carroll County's contract school employees could enter the 2007-2008 year with a 7 percent salary increase, if tentative agreements with five bargaining units are adopted. The pay raise was one of the points settled after a month of extended meetings between school officials and the bargaining units, which represent about 3,300 school employees including teachers, administrators, custodians, transportation and food-service staff, among others, said Stephen Guthrie, assistant superintendent of administration.
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck,Sun Staff Writer | August 22, 1994
If there is any hope of saving the rest of the 1994 baseball season, it lies in the ability of federal mediators to persuade the players and owners to tone down their angry rhetoric and make a serious attempt to reach a settlement.That may be easier said than done, but mediation chief John Calhoun Wells will bring the sides together today to lay the ground rules for the next phase of negotiations and map out a schedule for the resumption of collective bargaining.The mediation team will meet with Major League Baseball Players Association director Donald Fehr and ownership negotiator Richard Ravitch today, then meet separately with the two bargaining units tomorrow before full-scale negotiations resume -- probably on Wednesday.
BUSINESS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,Washington Bureau of The Sun Blair Walker of the The Sun's Business staff contributed to this report | April 24, 1991
WASHINGTON -- The Supreme Court unanimously upheld yesterday a government rule that will require the nation's private hospitals, with few exceptions, to bargain with up to eight different collections of their workers.Rejecting a claim by hospitals that the National Labor Relations Board has violated its duty to see that there are fewer unions among workers at some 4,000 private institutions, the court said rTC the NLRB had the power to write a broad bargaining unit rule that applies nationwide.
NEWS
March 3, 1991
The Carroll Board of Education, confronting uncertain state and local economies, last week asked the associations representing school workers to table further discussion on salaries for the 1991-1992 schoolyear for at least 60 days.The Association of Public Administrators and Supervisors of Carroll County, which represents 104 administrators and supervisors, agreed to the proposal in a tentative contract reached last week.The other four associations, which represent teachers, food service workers, custodians and clerical staff, are expected to respond tothe board proposal at negotiating sessions scheduled for this week.
BUSINESS
By Andrew Ratner and Andrew Ratner,SUN STAFF | June 21, 2001
Unionized workers protested outside offices of Verizon Communications Inc. yesterday in five cities, including Baltimore, alleging violations of the labor agreement that settled an 18-day strike against the telecommunications company last summer. Stirred by John J. Sweeney, president of the AFL-CIO, about 150 Verizon employees, wearing red T-shirts and carrying purple signs, chanted and marched in front of the company's offices on East Pratt Street at noon. The Communications Workers of America contend that the company - the nation's largest local and wireless telephone company - has thwarted organizing by workers in two divisions that handle wireless communications and yellow-page directory listings.
BUSINESS
By Andrew Ratner and Andrew Ratner,SUN STAFF | June 21, 2001
Unionized workers protested outside offices of Verizon Communications Inc. yesterday in five cities, including Baltimore, alleging violations of the labor agreement that settled an 18-day strike against the telecommunications company last summer. Stirred by John J. Sweeney, president of the AFL-CIO, about 150 Verizon employees, wearing red T-shirts and carrying purple signs, chanted and marched in front of the company's offices on East Pratt Street at noon. The Communications Workers of America contend that the company - the nation's largest local and wireless telephone company - has thwarted organizing by workers in two divisions that handle wireless communications and yellow-page directory listings.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | October 18, 2000
In a push that could lead to nearly full unionization of Anne Arundel County employees, the Teamsters are seeking to represent about 650 county workers who are not part of a bargaining unit. The Teamsters, who represent the deputy sheriffs, are also trying to organize white-collar professionals - mid-level managers, administrators and technical workers. This disparate group of employees says morale has bottomed out, that county pay scales have become lopsided and that their salaries are growing so slowly that some clerks are earning nearly what their supervisors are. In recent days, the Teamsters have petitioned the county to hold elections that could result in the union representing the eight sergeants in the sheriff's department and the 34 program administrators in the county jail, groups represented by the Teamsters on an informal basis.
NEWS
By TaNoah Morgan and TaNoah Morgan,SUN STAFF | January 19, 2000
In the second contest in a little more than a month, the Fraternal Order of Police and the Teamsters Union will square off today in a runoff election that will decide on a bargaining unit for about 550 Anne Arundel County police officers. The winner will get a two-year contract to negotiate with county officials for officers' pay and benefits, and to represent the police in grievances. Officers will vote between 7 a.m. and 5: 30 p.m. at the county's fire training academy in Millersville.
NEWS
By Greg Garland and Greg Garland,SUN STAFF | September 15, 1998
A state employee union filed an unfair labor practice complaint against the Glendening administration yesterday, claiming the union's representatives have been improperly denied access to state agencies and workers.The Maryland Classified Employees Association filed the complaint with the state Department of Labor, Licensing and Regulation. MCEA officials said they have asked for a hearing before a neutral arbitrator.Although it is the oldest labor group representing state employees, MCEA lost in collective bargaining elections after Gov. Parris N. Glendening signed an executive order in May 1996 giving state employees limited collective bargaining rights.
NEWS
By Jay Hancock and Jay Hancock,SUN STAFF Sun staff writer Thomas Waldron contributed to this article | December 14, 1996
Three major Maryland business organizations have decided to file a lawsuit to try to block Gov. Parris N. Glendening's grant of limited collective bargaining rights to state employees, people close to the groups said yesterday.The organizations, the Maryland Chamber of Commerce, the Greater Washington Board of Trade and the Greater Baltimore Committee, plan an announcement on the matter next week. After months of deliberation, the groups have agreed to collaborate on a suit that would seek to nullify Glendening's executive order on bargaining rights, the sources said, on the grounds that he overstepped authority and violated Maryland's Constitution.
NEWS
By Scott Wilson and Scott Wilson,SUN STAFF | December 10, 1996
The Teamsters union, which has filed a petition to represent Anne Arundel police officers and deputy sheriffs, is stuck in a bureaucratic turnstile that may ruin its chance of becoming the county's largest law enforcement bargaining unit.Since October, when more than 400 county police officers filed petition cards calling for a union vote, the Teamsters have been unable to arrange for elections. The vote would dissolve the Fraternal Order of Police, Lodge 70, which has represented county line officers for 24 years, and make the Teamsters their official bargaining unit.
NEWS
By Doug Donovan and Doug Donovan,SUN STAFF | September 12, 2004
The three-year contracts that the city's two firefighters unions grudgingly ratified last week may represent more than a measure of fiscal stability in the foreseeable future for Mayor Martin O'Malley's administration. The deals that gave union members 3 percent annual raises also handed the mayor what he most wanted from negotiations: health care concessions and long-term agreements to stabilize budget planning. And city officials hope that the police union and the two bargaining units for nonpublic safety workers will follow suit.
NEWS
By William F. Zorzi Jr. and William F. Zorzi Jr.,SUN STAFF | November 16, 1996
In what is being billed as the nation's largest union election in more than six years, the first of more than 40,000 eligible state employees have begun receiving ballots to pick which union will represent them in negotiations with the Glendening administration.Ballots are being mailed to workers amid radio advertising blitzes and threats of a lawsuit by business leaders, who would like to derail Gov. Parris N. Glendening's executive order giving state workers a limited form of collective bargaining.
BUSINESS
By Liz Bowie and Liz Bowie,SUN STAFF | October 23, 1996
A year-long struggle between the Omni Inner Harbor Hotel and its employees union will continue when an administrative law judge hears charges that the hotel tried to bust the last union of hotel workers in Baltimore.The National Labor Relations Board filed a complaint last month saying the hotel solicited employees to sign petitions to abolish the union and then failed to recognize it as a bargaining unit."It's a flat-out attempt to bust the union. They have no problem intimidating people, coercing people," said Paul Richards, executive secretary-treasurer of the Hotel Employees and Restaurant Employees Union, Local 7."
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