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Bargaining For State

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NEWS
May 21, 1996
GOV. PARRIS GLENDENING is mulling over a novel way to deal with the state legislature: If lawmakers pass something he doesn't like, he can simply issue decrees to countermand the General Assembly's wishes. And if the legislature refuses to pass something the governor wants, he can promulgate an executive order to do it anyway.Such actions skirt the edges of legality. The Department of Legislative Reference has already been asked to investigate. But that may not stop the governor from going ahead this week with an executive order to implement a form of collective bargaining for state workers -- though the General Assembly twice rejected such a move by wide margins last month.
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NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN STAFF | April 7, 1999
A Senate committee severely weakened Gov. Parris N. Glendening's bill guaranteeing collective bargaining for state employees by voting yesterday to exclude 8,000 nonfaculty workers in the University System of Maryland.The Senate Finance Committee approved the collective bargaining bill but the amendment deprives organized labor of one of its biggest gains in the bill proposed by the governor and approved by the House of Delegates.As changed by the Senate panel, the bill includes two other amendments supported by critics of Glendening's labor policies -- reducing the governor's bill to little more than his 1996 executive order granting collective bargaining rights to state employees.
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NEWS
By Thomas W. Waldron and Thomas W. Waldron,SUN STAFF | January 30, 1997
An Anne Arundel County judge upheld yesterday Gov. Parris N. Glendening's executive order giving collective bargaining rights to state workers, rejecting arguments by business groups that the governor had overstepped his powers.Although the business groups who challenged the governor said they might appeal, the ruling by Circuit Judge Eugene M. Lerner clears the way for state employees to begin collective bargaining for the first time."This court finds that [the] executive order meets Maryland constitutional and statutory requirements and is not in violation of the separation of powers," Lerner wrote in his 23-page ruling.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN STAFF | February 21, 1999
The Maryland Classified Employees Association, the oldest organization representing state workers, boasts a strong record of achievement for public employees: sick leave in the 1930s, pensions in the '40s, a credit union in the '50s, longevity pay in the '60s and retirement after 25 years in the '70s.But two years after it was rejected by state employees in elections to choose a collective bargaining agent, the 64-year-old labor organization is fighting to survive the 1999 General Assembly session.
NEWS
By Michael K. Burns | January 17, 1992
Four top staff members of the independent Maryland Classified Employees Association, the largest state employees union in Maryland, yesterday defected to a rival union, saying that independent labor unions face an increasingly difficult future.The four said their move from MCEA to Council 92, American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees, was based on belief that the national union, with affiliation, offered more resources and capability to represent state workers.Meanwhile, a third union organizing state workers announced that it has secured enough member signatures to achieve the automatic deduction of dues, or check-off, on state payroll checks.
NEWS
By Thomas W. Waldron and Marina Sarris and Thomas W. Waldron and Marina Sarris,SUN STAFF | April 15, 1996
Gov. Parris N. Glendening may have won passage for much of his legislative agenda in Annapolis this year, but in the process he disappointed two groups that were crucial to his election -- organized labor and environmentalists.Some unions, whose members worked the phones and staffed the polling places for Mr. Glendening during his 1994 campaign, say the governor's efforts to win collective bargaining for state employees during the legislative session that ended last week were halfhearted.
NEWS
By Barry Rascovar | June 16, 1996
A NEW DAY is about to begin in Maryland government. Thanks to an executive order by Gov. Parris Glendening, this state's government work force soon could be heavily unionized. That is likely to prove costly for taxpayers.The pros and cons of unionizing government workers can be argued endlessly. In many cases, it works out quite well and leads to a better labor-management relationship and more productivity.But labor unions are, by their nature, resistant to change that affects workers. Privatization efforts, no matter how cost-effective and sensible, are bitterly opposed.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN STAFF | April 7, 1999
A Senate committee severely weakened Gov. Parris N. Glendening's bill guaranteeing collective bargaining for state employees by voting yesterday to exclude 8,000 nonfaculty workers in the University System of Maryland.The Senate Finance Committee approved the collective bargaining bill but the amendment deprives organized labor of one of its biggest gains in the bill proposed by the governor and approved by the House of Delegates.As changed by the Senate panel, the bill includes two other amendments supported by critics of Glendening's labor policies -- reducing the governor's bill to little more than his 1996 executive order granting collective bargaining rights to state employees.
NEWS
December 30, 1996
Collective bargaining good for workersSo the Greater Baltimore Committee, Greater Washington Board of Trade and Maryland Chamber of Commerce are willing to spend several hundred thousands of dollars suing the governor over collective bargaining for state employees.Is this an example of creativity, which the private sector always claims as its own? Is this an example of leadership?What the business community really hates about collective bargaining for state employees is the idea that the employees might enjoy good pay, good benefits and good working conditions.
NEWS
October 5, 1996
Fans vilify Alomar, others try to understand his game 0) confrontation with umpireThe writer is president of the Baltimore Zionist District.90 days for abusing a child?I was stunned to read that Judge Raymond G. Thieme Jr. sentenced 20-year-old Jeremy Michael Coale, who pleaded guilty sexually abusing a 2-year-old child (and who was arrested in 1988 for sexually abusing a 4-year-old), to 30 days in jail. The maximum sentence that Judge Thieme could have imposed was 15 years.We wonder where to begin in reforming our judicial system?
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN STAFF | January 7, 1999
Of all the people who backed Gov. Parris N. Glendening in his successful re-election campaign, few have as legitimate a claim to his gratitude as Donna Edwards and her colleagues at the American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees.Edwards, head of AFSCME's branch representing state workers, and her union pulled out all the stops for the governor in his campaign against Republican Ellen R. Sauerbrey. AFSCME donated thousands of dollars, helped produce ads, ran get-out-the-vote operations and evangelized among its members in support of the man whose 1996 executive order gave state employees the right to bargain collectively.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Gady A. Epstein and Michael Dresser and Gady A. Epstein,SUN STAFF | January 5, 1999
Gov. Parris N. Glendening has told labor leaders he will make a new attempt to write collective bargaining for state employees into law this year -- possibly with an expanded reach that could add thousands of workers to union rolls.At the same time, Glendening has shelved an ambitious proposal to make Maryland the first state to ban the sale of all but child-proof handguns, going back on a campaign promise to introduce such legislation in the coming session.Glendening's decision to include a collective bargaining bill in his legislative package for the 90-day General Assembly session will reopen a battle the governor fought and lost in 1996.
NEWS
By Thomas W. Waldron and Thomas W. Waldron,SUN STAFF | October 7, 1997
Concluding the first round of collective bargaining for state employees, negotiators agreed yesterday on a pay raise of about 5 percent for some 8,000 prison guards and other public-safety personnel.The proposal would give each employee an additional $1,275 annually, and state officials said Gov. Parris N. Glendening will likely propose the same pay boost for all 72,000 state employees.That $1,275 increase, which must be approved by the General Assembly, would give the average state worker a 3.5 percent pay raise, at a cost to taxpayers of $56 million next year.
NEWS
By Thomas W. Waldron and Thomas W. Waldron,SUN STAFF | January 30, 1997
An Anne Arundel County judge upheld yesterday Gov. Parris N. Glendening's executive order giving collective bargaining rights to state workers, rejecting arguments by business groups that the governor had overstepped his powers.Although the business groups who challenged the governor said they might appeal, the ruling by Circuit Judge Eugene M. Lerner clears the way for state employees to begin collective bargaining for the first time."This court finds that [the] executive order meets Maryland constitutional and statutory requirements and is not in violation of the separation of powers," Lerner wrote in his 23-page ruling.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN STAFF | January 27, 1997
An article Jan. 27 incorrectly described pay raises given to Indiana state employees represented by the American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees. In fact, the raises for 1994 and 1995 were 3 percent and 4 percent respectively. The period during which state employees' pay was frozen was June 1991 through December 1993.The Sun regrets the error.INDIANAPOLIS -- Maryland business leaders who are going to court today to block Gov. Parris N. Glendening's plan to allow collective bargaining for state employees might want to leave Brian Burton off their witness list.
NEWS
December 30, 1996
Collective bargaining good for workersSo the Greater Baltimore Committee, Greater Washington Board of Trade and Maryland Chamber of Commerce are willing to spend several hundred thousands of dollars suing the governor over collective bargaining for state employees.Is this an example of creativity, which the private sector always claims as its own? Is this an example of leadership?What the business community really hates about collective bargaining for state employees is the idea that the employees might enjoy good pay, good benefits and good working conditions.
NEWS
By Thomas W. Waldron and Thomas W. Waldron,SUN STAFF | October 7, 1997
Concluding the first round of collective bargaining for state employees, negotiators agreed yesterday on a pay raise of about 5 percent for some 8,000 prison guards and other public-safety personnel.The proposal would give each employee an additional $1,275 annually, and state officials said Gov. Parris N. Glendening will likely propose the same pay boost for all 72,000 state employees.That $1,275 increase, which must be approved by the General Assembly, would give the average state worker a 3.5 percent pay raise, at a cost to taxpayers of $56 million next year.
NEWS
By Thomas W. Waldron and Thomas W. Waldron,SUN STAFF | December 26, 1996
State fiscal clerk grade 3 Cindi Foard and Maryland Chamber of Commerce President Champe C. McCulloch had not met before last week, when Foard and some other union protesters went to Annapolis to present him with an early Christmas gift -- a box of coal.The gift fit for a Grinch typified the hard feelings swirling around the lawsuit filed by three business groups last week to overturn Gov. Parris N. Glendening's executive order granting collective bargaining rights to state workers such as Foard.
NEWS
By Thomas W. Waldron and Thomas W. Waldron,SUN STAFF | December 26, 1996
State fiscal clerk grade 3 Cindi Foard and Maryland Chamber of Commerce President Champe C. McCulloch had not met before last week, when Foard and some other union protesters went to Annapolis to present him with an early Christmas gift -- a box of coal.The gift fit for a Grinch typified the hard feelings swirling around the lawsuit filed by three business groups last week to overturn Gov. Parris N. Glendening's executive order granting collective bargaining rights to state workers such as Foard.
NEWS
October 5, 1996
Fans vilify Alomar, others try to understand his game 0) confrontation with umpireThe writer is president of the Baltimore Zionist District.90 days for abusing a child?I was stunned to read that Judge Raymond G. Thieme Jr. sentenced 20-year-old Jeremy Michael Coale, who pleaded guilty sexually abusing a 2-year-old child (and who was arrested in 1988 for sexually abusing a 4-year-old), to 30 days in jail. The maximum sentence that Judge Thieme could have imposed was 15 years.We wonder where to begin in reforming our judicial system?
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