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NEWS
May 31, 2013
Another innocent child murdered in Baltimore is a crying shame. Baltimore came in fifth place nationally for its high murder rate. Maryland came in fourth place among the 50 states for the number of police officers killed (six) in the line of duty. Getting tough on second-offenders leaves innocent children and adults in more dangerous crossfire between criminals. If you chose to intentionally shoot another person, then you should expect the consequence is to spend a very long time in jail.
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BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | August 11, 2014
As music videos played on flat screen TVs overhead, Brendon Lee, 7, sank into a brown cushioned stool at Shoe City on Monday while his great-aunt poked the toe of the white Converse sneaker on his left foot. It was the right shoe but the wrong size. "Your toe is right there," said Evelyn Forby, as she waited for a store associate to check in the back for something larger. New shoes were the last thing on the list as the Baltimore resident wrapped up back-to-school shopping for the boy she's raised since he was a baby.
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NEWS
By Marina Sarris and Marina Sarris,SUN STAFF | January 26, 1996
The governor proposed legislation yesterday that would bring collective-bargaining rights to state employees -- and immediately drew fire from lawmakers worried that it would hurt Maryland's budget and its business climate.The bill would allow unions representing 40,000 to 50,000 government workers to negotiate salaries, hours and working conditions with management.Although it would not affect private employers, the measure could discourage businesses from locating in the state by promoting the impression that Maryland is too pro-labor, some Republicans and key Democrats said.
NEWS
July 6, 2014
The challenge and threat to the disabled, workers and public sector unions following the Supreme Court's decision in Harris v. Quinn ( "Public unions at risk," July 1) is real. Yet again the court has taken action abridging protections afforded working people who have done so much to sustain what remains of our ever shrinking middle class. For years, labor unions have been under increasing pressure, and it is no coincidence that the decline in union membership across the private and public sectors has coincided with the greatest income inequality we've seen since the Great Depression.
NEWS
By Howard Libit and Howard Libit,SUN STAFF | March 26, 2002
Maryland's teachers unions won a big victory last night in their quest for expanded power in collective bargaining, securing Senate passage of a measure designed to give them more say in such areas as classroom assignments and curriculum. The bill - pushed by Gov. Parris N. Glendening as part of his legislative package - now goes to the House of Delegates, where it is expected to pass easily. Last year, the House overwhelmingly supported a broader version of the legislation, only to see it die in a Senate committee without coming to a vote.
BUSINESS
By COX NEWS SERVICE | July 26, 2005
ATLANTA - Saying that AirTran Airways has been dragging its feet, the discount carrier's pilots have asked federal mediators to step into the stalled labor talks. The National Pilots Association, which represents about 1,100 pilots at AirTran, asked for help from the National Mediation Board after initiating talks late last year. "In more than seven months, AirTran management has only made it to the bargaining table for a total of six and a half days of talks," said the union's president, Allen Philpot.
NEWS
By Howard Libit and Howard Libit,SUN STAFF | March 27, 2001
Maryland's largest teachers union scored a significant legislative victory last night, winning approval from the House of Delegates for a bill to let them bargain such issues as curriculum and classroom assignments. "This is going to open a greater opportunity for the professionals in schools to have a voice in the policies set by school boards," said Patricia A. Foerster, president of the 54,000-member Maryland State Teachers Association. The MSTA is seeking the bill to allow -- but not require -- local school boards and unions to negotiate a broader range of issues.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | August 20, 2000
Disgruntled with their just-signed three-year contract, a number of Anne Arundel County deputy sheriffs are considering dumping the Teamsters and switching to a different bargaining agent. Deputies estimate that about half of the 56 deputies are dissatisfied enough with the Teamster-negotiated pact that they are willing to hear from other unions. Those deputies are furious that while the higher-paid county police and firefighters won hefty double-digit percentage raises, they received an average 7 percent raise.
NEWS
By Jennifer McMenamin and Jennifer McMenamin,SUN STAFF | June 16, 2002
Carroll school employee unions are preparing for what are expected to be the most difficult contract negotiations in years, after the school board cut pay raises from next year's budget and then tried unsuccessfully to change the rules of bargaining. The school board's divisive decision to back out of tentative contract agreements with the system's 2,800 employees, followed by the board's attempt to move contract renegotiations into open meetings, set an ugly stage from which contract talks must resume, union leaders said.
NEWS
January 22, 2014
Public employees have a right to be represented by a union and to collective bargaining in states like Maryland where the law allows it. And the only way such a system can work - at least on a practical level - is to require all those government workers represented by the union to pay for the costs of the bargaining that makes those benefits possible. Such an arrangement is commonplace and reasonable, yet it's being challenged in a lawsuit heard Tuesday by the U.S. Supreme Court.
NEWS
June 30, 2014
The Supreme Court didn't kill a key underpinning of public sector unionism Monday, but it surely put it on life support. The court's ruling in the Illinois case Harris v. Quinn, which related to the mandatory collection of so-called "fair share" fees from home health care workers whose wages are negotiated by a union whether those workers choose to belong to the union or not, was a relatively narrow one. It turned on the court's decision to draw a...
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | June 9, 2014
The Baltimore Teachers Union has filed a class action grievance against the city school system after the district made last-minute changes to its evaluation system, which knocked teachers down in ratings that are also tied to their ability to earn pay raises. In an email to members, Marietta English, president of the BTU, said the union filed the grievance because of changes the district made to the "cut scores," which affect whether a teacher is rated "highly effective" "effective," "developing" or "ineffective.
SPORTS
Mike Preston | March 25, 2014
Ravens general manager Ozzie Newsome is in his bargain-basement mode these days. Over the weekend the Ravens added two new players, which got a lot of fans excited, but neither center Jeremy Zuttah, formerly of the Tampa Bay Buccaneers, nor former St. Louis Rams safety Darian Stewart should make a dramatic difference to the Ravens this season. It appears that Newsome is filling in some gaps, like finding another backup running back or a rotational defensive lineman, but the major lifting is over until the NFL draft in May. Oh sure, Zuttah is better than Gino Gradkowski, who started at center last season for the Ravens.
NEWS
January 22, 2014
Public employees have a right to be represented by a union and to collective bargaining in states like Maryland where the law allows it. And the only way such a system can work - at least on a practical level - is to require all those government workers represented by the union to pay for the costs of the bargaining that makes those benefits possible. Such an arrangement is commonplace and reasonable, yet it's being challenged in a lawsuit heard Tuesday by the U.S. Supreme Court.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | November 13, 2013
Workers for Giant Food and Safeway in parts of Maryland, Virginia and Washington voted Wednesday to authorize a strike against the supermarket chains, saying management has refused to offer a fair labor contract. Members of United Food & Commercial Workers Local 400 voted overwhelmingly for the measure, which does not mean that a strike will occur but was meant to send a signal to the companies, the union said. Local 400 and Local 27, which represent Baltimore-area Giant and Safeway workers, have been in joint negotiations with both supermarket chains since early September.
NEWS
By Robert B. Reich | September 5, 2013
Congress will reconvene shortly. That means more battles over taxes and spending, regulations and safety nets, and how to get the economy out of first gear. Which means more gridlock and continual showdowns over budget resolutions and the debt ceiling. But before the hostilities start again and we all get lost in political strategies and petty tactics, it's useful to consider what's really at stake for our economy and democracy. For much of the past century, the basic bargain at the heart of America was that employers paid their workers enough to buy what American employers were selling.
SPORTS
By Childs Walker and Childs Walker,SUN STAFF | September 5, 2005
Players ruled the business of sports through most of the 1990s and early 2000s. In baseball, not even a canceled World Series could force the players union to accept a salary cap. Then, Alex Rodriguez became the $252 million man. In basketball, stars signed some of the biggest contracts in sports history, with rookies becoming multimillionaires before ever taking a dribble. In hockey, the average salary more than tripled between 1995 and 2004, even as the league's franchises reported hundreds of millions in annual losses.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | April 22, 1994
NEW YORK -- Apartment house owners and the union representing doormen, porters and handymen reached a tentative agreement on a new three-year contract yesterday, averting a strike that would have left front desks, elevators and garbage in the hands of tenants or temporary workers.Union leaders and officials from the owners' bargaining group, the Realty Advisory Board on Labor Relations, said that wages and other economic issues were the main sticking point in the all-night bargaining session.
NEWS
July 31, 2013
There is widespread agreement that the U.S. can become more competitive in the global marketplace if it lowers its corporate tax rate. There's also a consensus that the nation needs to spend more money on its vital infrastructure. So one might assume that a proposal to accomplish both — and one that would create thousands of jobs without adding to the deficit — would be greeted with a roar of approval. Hah, where have you been? The latest "grand bargain" President Barack Obama announced in Chattanooga, Tenn., on Tuesday drew immediate opposition from Republicans.
NEWS
By Laura Neuman | July 11, 2013
The Anne Arundel County government recently negotiated mutually agreeable contracts with 12 of the 13 unions that represent our workers during labor union talks. The Local 1563 International Association of Fire Fighters (IAFF) would have been the 13th, but we could not come to a successful agreement. The IAFF rejected the county administration's proposal for a two-year contract that provided the return to a three-shift, 48 hour work week effective January 1, 2014. The proposal included a 14.3 percent pay increase, a 3 percent merit increase on the employee's anniversary date and a 3 percent cost of living increase.
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