Advertisement
HomeCollectionsBargain Hunters
IN THE NEWS

Bargain Hunters

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | February 13, 2003
NEW YORK -Warren E. Buffett's $579 million cash bid for Burlington Industries Inc. is opposed by a majority of unsecured creditors, financier Wilbur L. Ross Jr. said yesterday. "Buffett is famous for buying dollar bills for 50 cents," Ross said in an interview. "We believe his offer is inadequate and apparently so do a number of other unsecured creditors." Ross, whose W.L. Ross & Co. LLC holds 25 percent of Burlington's unsecured debt, is vying with Buffett's Berkshire Hathaway Inc. for control of the company, now in bankruptcy proceedings.
ARTICLES BY DATE
FEATURES
By Marie Marciano Gullard, For The Baltimore Sun | June 20, 2013
For house hunters who think they couldn't possibly own a Georgian-style home in Baltimore's Roland Park neighborhood for under $1 million, then 504 Overhill Road may be a pleasant surprise — it's listed at $699,000. "This is a grand dame, old-style brick Colonial that [offers] over 5,000 square feet of living space," said listing agent Barbara Goldberg of Long & Foster Real Estate in reference to the 113-year-old home built on an embankment off a tree-lined street. "This is a lot of house for a little bit of money, and it has location for sure.
Advertisement
NEWS
By PHYLLIS FLOWERS AND PHYLLIS LUCAS | May 16, 1994
Saturday will be a busy day for bargain hunters. Here's a list of things to get you started.The Belle Grove Improvement Association will have its annual flea market beginning at 8 a.m. on the Bingo World parking lot, on the corner of 10th Avenue and Belle Grove Road. Refreshments will be sold.The rain date will be May 28.*The Brooklyn Health Association will sponsor a flea market from 8 a.m. until 3 p.m. on the Brooklyn Park Health Center parking lot, 300 Hammonds Lane.The rain date is May 22. Baked goods, hot dogs, soda, coffee and doughnuts will be sold.
BUSINESS
By Candus Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | August 10, 2012
With Labor Day still a few weeks away, the time to make Thanksgiving travel plans seems as far off as the Curiosity rover. This year, however, if you snooze, you lose. Airfares are climbing with no leveling-off in sight. The cheapest fares likely are the ones you're seeing now. And if you hope Amtrak will supply a cheaper alternative, forget it. The smallest sliver of promise is that airlines over the next 10 days may offer lower fares on a meager number of seats for Thanksgiving week - fringe-time seats such as the morning bleary-eye flight or the red-eye express.
FEATURES
By Knight-Ridder News Service | December 15, 1991
When it comes to travel, almost everybody's out there looking for the best deal today. And don't the scum and the lowlifes know it.In these lean economic times, gullible bargain hunters have been falling prey like never before to a growing number of outlandish and often outright fraudulent sales schemes for travel packages. The pitches generally are made through the mail, by phone or with a newspaper ad -- or a combination of these -- and they all have one thing in common: Those who get pulled in are bound to lose money, or, at the very best, get less, not more, than they bargained for.More and more, the operations are run on 900 phone numbers, so the suckers get hit twice -- once when they pay up to $8 a minute for the phone call, and then again if they are deceived into actually buying the package.
NEWS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,SUN STAFF | October 29, 1995
Despite some debate over whether the bearskin rug was authentic fur or synthetic fluff, Roxie and Rollie Henry figured it was a steal at $35.Meredith Barney, a Baltimore collectibles dealer, knew no one else at the show in Charlotte, N.C., would have antique Halloween costumes like the bundle she bought for $12.And Elkridge porcelain dealer Dan Cross didn't think twice about buying a set of dentures with seven gold teeth.Plenty of creepy and bizarre items were up for bid at auctioneer Brad Dudley's Halloween party and sale in the Idlewyld Community Hall on Friday night.
FEATURES
By Michael Dresser | July 28, 1999
1997 Borsao Campo de Borja ($6).This Spanish wine is the ideal hamburger red. It's a meaty, medium-bodied, rough-and-ready wine with chunky black currant fruit and a dash of herbs. There's nothing complex about it. The flavor hits one sweet note and holds it. Bargain hunters might want to consider a case purchase.Pub Date: 07/28/99
NEWS
By Ingrid Hansen and Ingrid Hansen,Contributing writer | December 27, 1991
It's beginning to look a lot like the week after Christmas, as exhausted holiday shoppers breathe a sigh of relief and bargain hunters goberserk."Everything is half price; this is the time to do it," said Lynn Tracy, a Pasadena resident who bought a cart-load of gift wrap and decorations at Frank's Nursery in Pasadena. "These prices are half of what you would have paid a week ago."Buying leftover merchandise is popular among shoppers and welcomed by businesses, according to Chuck Neal, assistant manager at Frank's.
FEATURES
July 3, 1991
A poll of some serious bargain hunters offers these tips for smart seasonal shopping:* THINK TRANSITIONAL: Summer's hot, bare looks may be on your mind, but don't pass up the heavier or long-sleeved clothes that may still be hanging around the clearance rack. That black, long-sleeved T-shirt will see plenty of service come fall. A bright shell top can go it alone now and under an easy jacket later.* ROOM TO GROW: If you're shopping for children and can budget some money for the year ahead, pick up basic pieces with plenty of growing room.
NEWS
By Staff report | August 5, 1992
What could be more relaxing after a harried work week than a serene cruise across a beautiful lake?Leave the children with a baby sitter and come aboard Piney Run's pontoon at 6:30 p.m. Friday for dinner and a leisurely sail. The crew will don aprons and serve fried chicken and salads.Reservations are requested. Cost is $6.50 per diner. The boat will leave the dock at 30 Martz Road, Eldersburg. Information: 795-3274.Or, how about tea at 3 p.m. with Barbie and friends? Children are invited to bring their favorite Barbie dolls to a tea party on the lake.
NEWS
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,chris.kaltenbach@baltsun.com | November 25, 2008
Haggling - it's not just for flea markets anymore. "My wife thinks I am nuts, as I view retail prices as list [prices] that are quite negotiable," says Richard Hughen, vice president for sales and marketing at CSA Medical Inc., a Baltimore-based medical technology company. "Many times they, in fact, are." With the weak economy persuading more people to shop hard for bargains, many seem to be resorting to good old-fashioned haggling. Not only is technology making it easier, thanks to Web sites that make comparison shopping a breeze, but some stores are even taking tiny steps to encourage it. And it's the big-ticket technology toys that seem to be targeted most often.
BUSINESS
By Marie Gullard and Marie Gullard,Special to The Sun | February 1, 2008
When it came to purchasing a new home and subsequently furnishing it, Nick and Ana Lazarides knew exactly what they wanted - even if the acquisition was slightly less than conventional. "I learned through a friend about houses being built in Carroll County," said Nick Lazarides, referring to the Peppermint Springs development in Westminster. "The builder there, John Sweeney, had a model that didn't appeal to us, but said if we found a house we liked, he'd build it." And so, after checking a variety of new homes elsewhere and deciding on a style they liked, the couple took Sweeney to see the model they picked out. They then purchased an acre of land on the development's hilly topography for $108,000.
NEWS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, Hanah Cho and Allison Connolly and Jamie Smith Hopkins, Hanah Cho and Allison Connolly,Sun reporters | November 24, 2007
Defying gloomy predictions of poor turnout, shoppers responded yesterday to retailers' aggressively advertised sales by packing a variety of Baltimore-area stores for the traditional kickoff to holiday buying. Passionate shoppers began lining up during pre-dawn hours to secure bargains on televisions, laptops and other merchandise. Electronic stores appeared to draw the biggest crowds in the Baltimore area and around the country. "I go overboard every year," said Linda Becker of Freeland, who does 70 percent of her holiday buying on Black Friday and who lined up before doors opened at Best Buy in Lutherville.
BUSINESS
By Andrea K. Walker and Andrea K. Walker,Sun reporter | December 27, 2006
Last year Nick Gill got what he thought were unstylish holiday gifts, so this year his Christmas list was short and simple: gift cards and cash, please. Gill's request was granted to the tune of $700 in cash and gift cards, and yesterday the 20-year-old college student from Parkville spent the morning with his brother and a neighborhood friend at Towson Town Center shopping. "Last year it just didn't work out with the clothes they were getting me," Gill said, as he toted bags from Pacific Sun and other stores.
NEWS
By MELISSA HARRIS and MELISSA HARRIS,SUN REPORTER | November 6, 2005
Want to buy a helicopter? Or one of 288 diamonds seized from a crooked insurance tycoon? A rickety surgical table gathering dust at Fort Meade? Or even a strip club in Fells Point? At one time or another, all of these items have had one thing in common: Uncle Sam sold them on the Internet, an up-to-date way for the government to unload seized or surplus property. But finding the feds' many versions of eBay hasn't always been easy - a fact that officials are trying to change as they seek to cash in on America's love of a good bargain.
BUSINESS
By Meredith Cohn and Meredith Cohn,SUN STAFF | November 27, 2004
From the evidence piling up in the parking lot of the Port Covington Wal-Mart, flat screen televisions were a hot sale item on the first day of the holiday shopping season. Collections of TV boxes, apparently too big to fit into most cars, lay in the corners. Their white foam innards, crushed by passing shopping carts and cars, covered the asphalt like an early snowfall. The South Baltimore store opened its doors at 6 a.m. to a line of shoppers snaked around the building waiting for their chance to snag bargain-priced TVs and other specials.
FEATURES
By Marie Marciano Gullard, For The Baltimore Sun | June 20, 2013
For house hunters who think they couldn't possibly own a Georgian-style home in Baltimore's Roland Park neighborhood for under $1 million, then 504 Overhill Road may be a pleasant surprise — it's listed at $699,000. "This is a grand dame, old-style brick Colonial that [offers] over 5,000 square feet of living space," said listing agent Barbara Goldberg of Long & Foster Real Estate in reference to the 113-year-old home built on an embankment off a tree-lined street. "This is a lot of house for a little bit of money, and it has location for sure.
NEWS
By Shirley Leung and Shirley Leung,Sun Staff Writer | January 8, 1995
Nothing is guaranteed at Fort Meade's version of a rummage sale, except the prices: an IBM printer for $30, a plush orange armchair for $1, a rotary phone for 25 cents.d,3 Starting tomorrow, the military retail outlet, called the Defense Reutilization and Marketing Office, will open to the public from 8 a.m. to noon, Monday through Friday. The store had been open only once a week.Sharon McMillon, chief of the outlet's distribution, said the increased hours mean more money for the government.
TRAVEL
By Jane Engle and Jane Engle,Los Angeles Times | November 16, 2003
Hotels and airlines are finally making us pay for being so cheap. These last two years have been good ones for penny-pinching vacationers -- maybe too good. If they click on the right dates, Internet surfers can land luxury rooms for less than $100. Airfares, although edging up, are the lowest in decades. Credit the bad economy, the battered travel business and the bargain-hunting possibilities of the Web. But there are signs that the strapped providers of plane seats and hotel beds are losing patience with the cheap Charlies who erode their bottom lines.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.