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NEWS
By Dan Berger | August 21, 2000
It's all about whether the Andover-Yale chap or the St. Albans-Harvard gentleman is the more persuasive polulist. For some topics, "Don't ask, don't tell," is still the best approach. Such as the religion, if any, of public office-seekers. Below the icy surface of the Barents Sea, the Cold War never thawed. They are blowing up the better public housing built after 1968. Makes you hope they know what they are doing.
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NEWS
By Douglas M. Birch and Douglas M. Birch,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | February 19, 2004
MOSCOW - It was meant to be an impressive display of military might. Instead, Russia wound up looking like the former superpower that couldn't shoot straight. A missile launched from the Karelia, a nuclear-powered submarine in the Barents Sea, veered off course yesterday and automatically self-destructed, Russian wire services reported. It marked the third time during the exercises for Russia's nuclear forces, billed as the largest since the Soviet era, that a missile launch went awry.
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NEWS
May 6, 1992
Chernobyl introduced the world to the lax safety procedures in nuclear plants of the now-defunct Soviet Union, but the Barents Sea was where the system's roughest edges were hidden. That is the import of the revelations by a Russian nuclear engineer, Andrei Zolotkov, who says he participated in dumping radioactive reactor wastes off Novaya Zemlya during the 1970s.Later, as a member of the old Soviet parliament, Mr. Zolotkov must have had pangs of conscience as he began gathering the evidence for the reports that he recently released to Western environmental groups.
NEWS
By David Holley and David Holley,LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 31, 2003
MOSCOW - Russian authorities abandoned hope yesterday of finding survivors among seven missing crew members of a nuclear-powered submarine that sank before dawn as it was being towed to a scrap yard. One survivor was plucked from the Barents Sea shortly after the accident, and two bodies were recovered. There is no likelihood of finding additional survivors, Defense Minister Sergei B. Ivanov told reporters after arriving in Severomorsk, the main base of Russia's Northern Fleet. "The sub went to the bottom ... with an open deckhouse," Ivanov said, which meant seawater would have flooded the ship.
NEWS
By David Holley and David Holley,LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 31, 2003
MOSCOW - Russian authorities abandoned hope yesterday of finding survivors among seven missing crew members of a nuclear-powered submarine that sank before dawn as it was being towed to a scrap yard. One survivor was plucked from the Barents Sea shortly after the accident, and two bodies were recovered. There is no likelihood of finding additional survivors, Defense Minister Sergei B. Ivanov told reporters after arriving in Severomorsk, the main base of Russia's Northern Fleet. "The sub went to the bottom ... with an open deckhouse," Ivanov said, which meant seawater would have flooded the ship.
NEWS
By Douglas M. Birch and Douglas M. Birch,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | February 19, 2004
MOSCOW - It was meant to be an impressive display of military might. Instead, Russia wound up looking like the former superpower that couldn't shoot straight. A missile launched from the Karelia, a nuclear-powered submarine in the Barents Sea, veered off course yesterday and automatically self-destructed, Russian wire services reported. It marked the third time during the exercises for Russia's nuclear forces, billed as the largest since the Soviet era, that a missile launch went awry.
NEWS
By Norman Polmar | August 23, 2000
WASHINGTON -- How could it have happened? The Kursk was one of the most modern submarines of the Russian fleet. A giant, 19,000-ton, 505-foot underwater missile cruiser, it was designed to attack U.S. aircraft carriers with long-range missiles. Except for the Russian Typhoon strategic missile submarines, the Kursk and its sister boats are the largest submarines ever built -- larger in volume than even the Trident missile submarines, the largest U.S. undersea craft. The Kursk was new, completed in 1995, and its crew was considered one of the best in the Navy.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | November 22, 1998
WASHINGTON -- Throughout four decades of Cold War, a great and dangerous game was played out in the shadows.Secret U-2 flights snapped pictures of missile silos. Spies were swapped during late-night rendezvous at Glienicker Bridge in Germany. Phone calls were plucked from Kremlin limousines by roving U.S. eavesdropping satellites.But what took place in the skies and on the ground was rivaled by the little-known espionage beneath the waves. Spies didn't just wear trench coats; they also wore Navy blue.
TOPIC
October 14, 2001
The Crisis U.S. BOMBERS and cruise missiles hit Afghanistan all week, pausing Friday for the Muslim holy day ... PRESIDENT BUSH said the bombing could be halted if the Taliban handed over Osama bin Laden ... A MOST-WANTED list of 22 terrorists was announced ... THREE PEOPLE were exposed to anthrax - one died - all connected to a Boca Raton, Fla., building that housed the operations of supermarket tabloids ... ANOTHER CASE of anthrax was reported in...
NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | August 28, 2000
MOSCOW - A fire in the 1,771-foot television tower here cut off nearly all TV broadcasting yesterday, forcing Muscovites to find diversion elsewhere and to ask themselves if their country's woes will ever stop. People who might have been at home watching the "Kukly" satirical puppet program or "Sports Express" or a movie called "The Cold Summer of '53," were out strolling last night. Instead of getting the usual diet of bad news from their televisions, they were left wondering what else could go wrong.
TOPIC
October 14, 2001
The Crisis U.S. BOMBERS and cruise missiles hit Afghanistan all week, pausing Friday for the Muslim holy day ... PRESIDENT BUSH said the bombing could be halted if the Taliban handed over Osama bin Laden ... A MOST-WANTED list of 22 terrorists was announced ... THREE PEOPLE were exposed to anthrax - one died - all connected to a Boca Raton, Fla., building that housed the operations of supermarket tabloids ... ANOTHER CASE of anthrax was reported in...
NEWS
September 16, 2000
Does a Kursk lurk in our own future? As a longtime student of Norman Polmar's writings, I was greatly interested in his comments regarding the Kursk tragedy ("American Navy missed chance to rescue sub," Opinion Commenatary, Aug. 23). However, I would ask Mr. Polmar and others interpreting the incident as an indicator of the dangerous state to which Russia's military has declined, to apply the Kursk's lessons closer to home. There is a Kursk in our own future. Since the end of the Cold War, our military budgets have shrunk considerably.
NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | August 28, 2000
MOSCOW - A fire in the 1,771-foot television tower here cut off nearly all TV broadcasting yesterday, forcing Muscovites to find diversion elsewhere and to ask themselves if their country's woes will ever stop. People who might have been at home watching the "Kukly" satirical puppet program or "Sports Express" or a movie called "The Cold Summer of '53," were out strolling last night. Instead of getting the usual diet of bad news from their televisions, they were left wondering what else could go wrong.
NEWS
By Norman Polmar | August 23, 2000
WASHINGTON -- How could it have happened? The Kursk was one of the most modern submarines of the Russian fleet. A giant, 19,000-ton, 505-foot underwater missile cruiser, it was designed to attack U.S. aircraft carriers with long-range missiles. Except for the Russian Typhoon strategic missile submarines, the Kursk and its sister boats are the largest submarines ever built -- larger in volume than even the Trident missile submarines, the largest U.S. undersea craft. The Kursk was new, completed in 1995, and its crew was considered one of the best in the Navy.
NEWS
By Dan Berger | August 21, 2000
It's all about whether the Andover-Yale chap or the St. Albans-Harvard gentleman is the more persuasive polulist. For some topics, "Don't ask, don't tell," is still the best approach. Such as the religion, if any, of public office-seekers. Below the icy surface of the Barents Sea, the Cold War never thawed. They are blowing up the better public housing built after 1968. Makes you hope they know what they are doing.
NEWS
By Paul Reid and Paul Reid,COX NEWS SERVICE | August 17, 2000
WEST PALM BEACH, Fla. - From the bottom of the ladder, looking up, the circle of sky beyond the open hatch looks pretty small. Far away, and very small. Then a sailor pulls down on the hatch and dogs it tight. Drops of water fall past steel ladders and twisting cables and onto the deck, where they glisten in the dim red light of the control room. A voice nearby, a sailor: "It's quiet, no?" Yes, it's quiet on board the USS Hampton. During the Cold War, nuclear submarines were shrouded in quiet and secrecy, almost everything about them a mystery.
NEWS
By Paul Reid and Paul Reid,COX NEWS SERVICE | August 17, 2000
WEST PALM BEACH, Fla. - From the bottom of the ladder, looking up, the circle of sky beyond the open hatch looks pretty small. Far away, and very small. Then a sailor pulls down on the hatch and dogs it tight. Drops of water fall past steel ladders and twisting cables and onto the deck, where they glisten in the dim red light of the control room. A voice nearby, a sailor: "It's quiet, no?" Yes, it's quiet on board the USS Hampton. During the Cold War, nuclear submarines were shrouded in quiet and secrecy, almost everything about them a mystery.
NEWS
September 16, 2000
Does a Kursk lurk in our own future? As a longtime student of Norman Polmar's writings, I was greatly interested in his comments regarding the Kursk tragedy ("American Navy missed chance to rescue sub," Opinion Commenatary, Aug. 23). However, I would ask Mr. Polmar and others interpreting the incident as an indicator of the dangerous state to which Russia's military has declined, to apply the Kursk's lessons closer to home. There is a Kursk in our own future. Since the end of the Cold War, our military budgets have shrunk considerably.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | November 22, 1998
WASHINGTON -- Throughout four decades of Cold War, a great and dangerous game was played out in the shadows.Secret U-2 flights snapped pictures of missile silos. Spies were swapped during late-night rendezvous at Glienicker Bridge in Germany. Phone calls were plucked from Kremlin limousines by roving U.S. eavesdropping satellites.But what took place in the skies and on the ground was rivaled by the little-known espionage beneath the waves. Spies didn't just wear trench coats; they also wore Navy blue.
NEWS
May 6, 1992
Chernobyl introduced the world to the lax safety procedures in nuclear plants of the now-defunct Soviet Union, but the Barents Sea was where the system's roughest edges were hidden. That is the import of the revelations by a Russian nuclear engineer, Andrei Zolotkov, who says he participated in dumping radioactive reactor wastes off Novaya Zemlya during the 1970s.Later, as a member of the old Soviet parliament, Mr. Zolotkov must have had pangs of conscience as he began gathering the evidence for the reports that he recently released to Western environmental groups.
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