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By Patti Restivo | July 6, 2011
If you want to get folks fired up about Renaissance theater, poking fun at William Shakespeare is one way to do it. The Chesapeake Shakespeare Company is doing that now with the second half of its ninth summer season, the parody "The Complete Works of William Shakespeare (abridged)," written by Adam Long, Daniel Singer and Jess Borgeson. The Bard, to be sure, did not pen the abridged "Complete Works. " Former founding members of the Reduced Shakespeare Company wrote and performed this script for the first time at the Edinburgh Festival Fringe in 1987.
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By Tim Smith and The Baltimore Sun | September 13, 2014
For the past 12 years, the name Chesapeake Shakespeare Company has been most associated with its outdoor productions in summer and fall, reached by trekking up a hill to the rustic ruins of Patapsco Female Institute Historic Park in Ellicott City. Audience seating typically involved folding chairs or blankets. This week, the company inaugurates a striking new home in downtown Baltimore that suggests a hip version of the famed Globe Theatre in London where Shakespeare's own company performed.
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NEWS
April 29, 2005
On Tuesday, April 26, 2005, FRIEDA BARD (nee Silverman); beloved wife of the late Albert C. Bard; loving mother of Dr. Richard Henry Bard of New York, NY and Dr. Marjorie Ann Brownstein of Las Vegas, NV; dear mother in-law of Jane M. Bard and Dr. Marshall Brownstein; adored sister of Dr. Frank Silverman and Florence Kramer and the late Jack L. Silverman and Eva F. Goldenberg; loving grandmother of David Evan and Karen Jane Bard and Dr. Jeffrey Neil and...
NEWS
By Mary Johnson, For The Baltimore Sun | August 11, 2014
After three successful seasons, the Annapolis Shakespeare Company is completing its final production as a resident theater company at Bowie Playhouse with a fine production of Shakespeare's "The Tempest," continuing weekends through Aug. 17. Annapolis Shakespeare was founded in 2009 by Sally Boyett as a workshop group and quickly rose to become an accomplished performance company at Bowie Playhouse. Nevertheless, when the troupe made its Bowie debut in 2011 with "Twelfth Night," one could hardly have anticipated it outgrowing this venue in just three years.
NEWS
By Michael James | October 3, 1990
WANTED: Traveling Bard to provide inspiration at an office in need of musical enlightenment.The qualified candidate will possess his/her own lyre and must be versed in ancient Greek poetry. Voice must be soft and lilting. Minstrels a plus but not necessary.Added consideration will be given to those who have a whimsical view of Howard County happenings and various news events that shape the daily lives of those who work in the county mainstream.We offer an excellent benefits package and pleasant working conditions, but no pay. The job will be rewarding to those whose mission is to use music as an inspirational force in the modern-day office structure.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson, For The Baltimore Sun | March 14, 2013
With her latest production, Annapolis Shakespeare Company founder and artistic director Sally Boyett-D'Angelo is expanding the young company's horizons, both artistically and physically. At a recent rehearsal of Jon Jory's adaptation of Jane Austen's "Pride and Prejudice," Boyett-D'Angelo announced the company will soon move to recently acquired space for rehearsals, offices, a costume shop and a performance studio, at 111 Chinquapin Round Road. It's the latest advancement under Boyett-D'Angelo's guidance.
NEWS
By GEOFFREY FIELDING | February 15, 1994
Newly surfaced is a copy of an account of the death of Edgar Allan Poe, written by Eugene Lemoine Didier in 1899, on the 50th anniversary of the poet's death.The basis for the account, according to Didier, one of the earliest biographers of the poet, is a former, unidentified, Baltimorean ''recently living in California.'' In his journal, Didier notes that on June 9, 1899, he sent ''the Poe article to the Sat. Evg. Post.'' It was accepted and he was paid $50. The following September he sent an article on the semi-centennial death of Poe to the Baltimore American, the Philadelphia Times, the Washington Post and the St. Louis Globe Democrat.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith and The Baltimore Sun | September 13, 2014
For the past 12 years, the name Chesapeake Shakespeare Company has been most associated with its outdoor productions in summer and fall, reached by trekking up a hill to the rustic ruins of Patapsco Female Institute Historic Park in Ellicott City. Audience seating typically involved folding chairs or blankets. This week, the company inaugurates a striking new home in downtown Baltimore that suggests a hip version of the famed Globe Theatre in London where Shakespeare's own company performed.
FEATURES
By Nelson Pressley and Nelson Pressley,special to the sun | November 13, 2007
Shakespeare treated with respect, love Shakespeare is serious business, or so it seems to Everyman Theatre. The troupe has waited 17 years for its maiden fling with the Bard, and the jitters only show a little in the company's lively, often moving Much Ado About Nothing. Most of the rough patches come right out of the gate, with director Vincent M. Lancisi's cast acting at full volume and making the language seem like heavy lifting. Luckily, the large company soon eases into the warm Mediterranean setting and the pointed badinage, especially when Deborah Hazlett's appealing, unusually wise Beatrice starts aiming barbs at Jim Jack's Benedick.
FEATURES
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 16, 1996
Scotland's national bard, Robert Burns, died 200 years ago on July 21 at the age of 37. To commemorate the bicentenary of his death, events have been planned throughout Scotland.Among them is an exhibition called "Pride and Passion," which will run through Sept. 15 at the Royal Museum of Scotland in Edinburgh. Songs and audiovisual material complement manuscripts, paintings and objects to present a full picture of a life that embraced farming, traveling, Freemasonry and romance as well as poetry.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson, For The Baltimore Sun | April 3, 2014
Are we in the midst of a mini-Shakespeare festival? The area is currently enjoying two innovative productions of works by the Bard: Compass Rose Theater's "Romeo and Juliet" — reviewed here last week — and Annapolis Shakespeare Company's "Hamlet," now playing at Bowie Playhouse. Director Sally Boyett boldly delves into the psyche of Hamlet to accomplish a nearly impossible feat: bringing suspense to this much-told tale of the melancholy Danish prince. Boyett places the character in the 21st century, confronting the mystery of his father's death and his anguish over his mother's hasty marriage to Claudius, the king's brother and Hamlet's uncle.
NEWS
By Clarence Page | October 31, 2013
Observing Washington politics close-up has given me a new appreciation of Shakespeare. Now I see where he got his ideas. "Today, you could say that almost all of our political rhetoric, comes from two books from the 16th and 17th centuries: the King James Bible and Shakespeare's plays," Michael Witmore, director of Folger Shakespeare Library, told me last year. I recently talked to Mr. Witmore again at the 71-year-old independent research library and theater, which sits only a block east of the Capitol.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson, For The Baltimore Sun | March 14, 2013
With her latest production, Annapolis Shakespeare Company founder and artistic director Sally Boyett-D'Angelo is expanding the young company's horizons, both artistically and physically. At a recent rehearsal of Jon Jory's adaptation of Jane Austen's "Pride and Prejudice," Boyett-D'Angelo announced the company will soon move to recently acquired space for rehearsals, offices, a costume shop and a performance studio, at 111 Chinquapin Round Road. It's the latest advancement under Boyett-D'Angelo's guidance.
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By Mike Giuliano | November 1, 2011
"Anonymous" is not shy about naming names. It contends that the 37 plays attributed to William Shakespeare, who died in 1616, actually were written by the Earl of Oxford, who died in 1604. As this story has it, the barely literate commoner Shakespeare fronted for the highly literate and politically well-connected nobleman Oxford. Consequently, such late Shakespeare plays as "The Tempest" reputedly would have been written many years earlier, stockpiled, and then eventually released under Shakespeare's name.
EXPLORE
By Patti Restivo | July 6, 2011
If you want to get folks fired up about Renaissance theater, poking fun at William Shakespeare is one way to do it. The Chesapeake Shakespeare Company is doing that now with the second half of its ninth summer season, the parody "The Complete Works of William Shakespeare (abridged)," written by Adam Long, Daniel Singer and Jess Borgeson. The Bard, to be sure, did not pen the abridged "Complete Works. " Former founding members of the Reduced Shakespeare Company wrote and performed this script for the first time at the Edinburgh Festival Fringe in 1987.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | July 2, 2011
Fireflies crisscross a meadow as an audience on lawn chairs and blankets takes in the fast-paced complications of "As You Like It" on the grounds of the Evergreen Museum and Library — a particularly apt setting for the Maryland Shakespeare Festival production. "We wondered if we should bring scenery, since this is perfect for the Forest of Arden, where the action takes place," said company artistic director John Bellomo. "Looking up at the stars and hearing this great poetry, it's like we're all in the woods together.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,mary.mccauley@baltsun.com | April 2, 2009
In Ages of Man, actor Marc Horwitz provides audiences with a new definition of tough. Horwitz might not chase criminals for a living or enter burning houses to rescue trapped children. All he has to do is stand on stage by himself and talk to people who aren't there. He just has to deliver 110 minutes of sonnets and Shakespearean dialogue while shifting between two dozen roles. He merely must act his heart out inches from a room full of blank-eyed, arms-crossed, foot-jiggling theatergoers who can see every drop of sweat trickling down his face.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | October 26, 2004
The Baltimore Symphony Orchestra brushed up its Shakespeare for the opening of the Symphony with a Twist series. The tightly knit program included music inspired by the Bard and excerpts from his plays interpreted by members of the Shakespeare Theatre in Washington. Modest scenic elements were introduced to Meyerhoff Symphony Hall Saturday night, notably a cute starlit backdrop and bursts of confetti from the ceiling to go with scenes from A Midsummer Night's Dream. As a curtain-raiser, conductor Marin Alsop chose the literally striking Death of Tybalt from Prokofiev's ballet Romeo and Juliet.
EXPLORE
By Carolyn Kelemen | June 8, 2011
Again this spring season, dancer-director Jacob Rice will be the key male figure on stage in the Central Maryland Youth Ballet 's production of "A Midsummer Night's Dream" at the Slayton House Theatre. He will partner a young ballerina in the showcased classical pas de deux . But if all goes as planned, Rice will find himself less in demand in coming years, as his current crop of proteges grow into their roles. Jacob Rice and his wife, Kimmary Williams, started teaching ballet in Columbia in 2005 with a mere six students.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | September 18, 2010
Generations ago, Baltimore poet Folger McKinsey wrote "Charles Street in the Fall" about a stroll through the city. On Saturday, his descendents gathered for their 100th reunion, where they ate, played games and celebrated their heritage. "It's neat that this will carry on," said organizer and distant relative Glenn Opperman Sr. of New Jersey. Wearing turn-of-the-century garb to commemorate the centennial, Opperman, 60, said, "We're all afraid to say, 'This is it.'" On Saturday, the extended family gathered at Brandywine Springs State Park, site of the first family picnic in 1910, to continue the legacy and to remember the past.
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