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Barbed Wire

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NEWS
By James M. Coram and James M. Coram,Staff Writer | September 15, 1992
Motorists stopping at the northbound rest stop on Interstate 95 in north Laurel will soon find themselves surrounded by fences topped with barbed wire.The State Highway Administration will add barbed wire to chain-link fences already surrounding the rest stop and to new chain-link fencing that will be built inside the old fences.Together, the two fences will create a moat-like effect, separating the rest stop from the heavily wooded terrain that leads to nearby neighborhoods.Police believe a man and a male teen-ager from Washington, D.C., entered nearby Bowling Brook Farms from the cover of the woods at the rest stop last week and hijacked a car with a child inside and the child's mother, who had become entangled in a seat belt, was then dragged two miles to her death.
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NEWS
By Mary Johnson, For The Baltimore Sun | March 6, 2014
Wayne Shipley returned to Chesapeake Arts Center last weekend to host the premiere of his second independent Western film, "Day of the Gun. " Before his filmmaking career, Shipley taught English and theater arts for 30 years at Andover and North County high schools. Then, in retirement, Shipley brought his extensive background to Chesapeake Arts Center in 1998 as the center's first executive director, establishing Chesapeake's firm base as a regional arts venue before leaving in spring 2004.
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NEWS
By Kathy Lally and Kathy Lally,Moscow Bureau of The Sun | November 27, 1994
SARATOV, Russia -- Once the barbed-wire factory here worked two shifts a day, gears rattling, motors roaring, twisting, chopping and spooling enough shiny, spiky wire to wrap up the whole enormous Soviet Union.Now times are tough. Peace has come, the economy has gone to the devil, and the barbed wire orders that provided socially useful labor for the inmates of the Saratov penal colony are dwindling away."Yes, the world has changed," said Nikolai A. Ivanov, warden of prison colony III-382/33.
NEWS
By Laura Vozzella, The Baltimore Sun | February 2, 2011
The hottest thing in running is not a new shoe or energy drink. It's mud. And fire. And other things that get in the way of running but manage, for some, to make racing more fun. Obstacle-course events that send participants into mud pits and under barbed wire, over walls and through flames, across monkey bars greased with butter and into a forest of live electric wires, are popping up like blisters on an Ironman's feet. While they sound hard core, some of these races appeal especially to casual runners because the obstacles break up the running and take the focus off finish times.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson, For The Baltimore Sun | March 6, 2014
Wayne Shipley returned to Chesapeake Arts Center last weekend to host the premiere of his second independent Western film, "Day of the Gun. " Before his filmmaking career, Shipley taught English and theater arts for 30 years at Andover and North County high schools. Then, in retirement, Shipley brought his extensive background to Chesapeake Arts Center in 1998 as the center's first executive director, establishing Chesapeake's firm base as a regional arts venue before leaving in spring 2004.
NEWS
By JOHN MURPHY and JOHN MURPHY,SUN FOREIGN REPORTER | November 1, 2005
HOWEJAH, Syria -- A thin coil of barbed wire, so low in sections that a child might leap over it without fear of being snagged, serves as the only barrier separating this Syrian village in the lush Euphrates River valley from Iraq. Syria's head of border security, Maj. Gen. Amin Suleiman Charabeh, pointed to the obstacle as evidence that Syria is trying to keep foreign fighters from slipping into Iraq to join the insurgency against American forces. But, he confessed, those efforts clearly are not enough to stop the fighters.
NEWS
By TOM HORTON | July 1, 1995
One of the oddest sights I can recall on the bay was a waterman, about this time several years ago, unrolling barbed wire from his workboat into Virginia's Rappahannock River.Back and forth he maneuvered, laying wire in grids, as if trying to fence off the river bottom.I later learned that is exactly what he was attempting. He had oyster leases there, with thousands of dollars in shellfish growing fat, he hoped, by harvest time in the fall.As he labored, great herds of a curious, oyster-loving sea creature were flapping and gliding up the bay from as far away as South America, to pass the summer mating and birthing their pups.
NEWS
February 5, 1992
Every May the faithful trek to La Crosse, Kan., for the annual Barbed Wire Festival. There are wire-splicing contests, an awards banquet and exhibits at the 5,400-square-foot Kansas Barbed Wire Collectors Association Museum. Collectors haggle over various types of wire, with the rarest going for $300 for an 18-inch piece. Before the fun is over, many of these collectors also plunk down $100 for a pamphlet identifying 622 kinds of wire.Two other barbed wire museums exist in the United States.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,SUN FILM CRITIC | May 3, 1996
It took some nerve to conceive of the improbably pneumatic Pamela Anderson Lee as Bogart in a clone of "Casablanca," but the makers of "Barb Wire" lack no moxie.Talent, they lack.Taste? Not a lick.Sense, nowhere in sight.But nerve up the kazoo!Lee continually lists toward whichever direction her bust is aimed. With a kind of tense, plummy face and a body that appears to be morphed out of a computer hacker's most perfervid fantasy, plus 200 gallons of industrial-strength collagen hypoed into every conceivable thoracic cavity, Lee can hardly be said to act.Heck, she can hardly be said to walk.
NEWS
By Jay Apperson and Jay Apperson,SUN STAFF | October 15, 1996
Dominus was stepping out, maybe even looking for love. Horsing around, if you will.But the prize-winning Arabian's jaunt hit a snag yesterday on a Parkton farm, where he became tangled in a strand of barbed wire. What followed was an equine rescue effort from police officers, volunteer firefighters and, finally, a veterinarian.Dominus will spend the next two months cooling his heels, confined to a stall to recover from wounds that include a severed tendon in a rear leg."He's going to be lame.
NEWS
By JOHN MURPHY and JOHN MURPHY,SUN FOREIGN REPORTER | November 1, 2005
HOWEJAH, Syria -- A thin coil of barbed wire, so low in sections that a child might leap over it without fear of being snagged, serves as the only barrier separating this Syrian village in the lush Euphrates River valley from Iraq. Syria's head of border security, Maj. Gen. Amin Suleiman Charabeh, pointed to the obstacle as evidence that Syria is trying to keep foreign fighters from slipping into Iraq to join the insurgency against American forces. But, he confessed, those efforts clearly are not enough to stop the fighters.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | May 31, 2002
QALANDIYA, West Bank - The coils of barbed wire begin at the military checkpoint here and follow the rocky terrain, skirting a refugee camp and an abandoned airport before ending at another Israeli army post three miles away. The barbed wire fence, in places 10 feet high, is the latest attempt by Israel to intercept Palestinian suicide bombers before they reach Israeli cities - part of an ambitious plan called "enveloping Jerusalem" intended to protect the city's neighborhoods in the West Bank with a protective fence or wall.
NEWS
By Kathy Lally and Kathy Lally,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | November 4, 1999
MOSCOW -- The women, babies in their arms, children at their sides, stand against the coils of barbed wire, shouting at the Russian soldiers before them in anger and desperation, crying in helplessness and fear or simply shocked into miserable silence.Behind them, perhaps 10,000 other refugees press forward, straining to escape the destruction of war-torn Chechnya. The women at the front struggle to stand up. The barbed wire tears at their skirts. The soldiers let only a few stumble through.
NEWS
By Jay Apperson and Jay Apperson,SUN STAFF | October 15, 1996
Dominus was stepping out, maybe even looking for love. Horsing around, if you will.But the prize-winning Arabian's jaunt hit a snag yesterday on a Parkton farm, where he became tangled in a strand of barbed wire. What followed was an equine rescue effort from police officers, volunteer firefighters and, finally, a veterinarian.Dominus will spend the next two months cooling his heels, confined to a stall to recover from wounds that include a severed tendon in a rear leg."He's going to be lame.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 15, 1996
SONBONG, North Korea -- In the lobby of the Sonbong House of Culture is a huge oil painting of the late "Great Leader," Kim Il Sung, and his son, and current leader, Kim Jong Il. But in the alcoves, North Koreans wearing their Kim Il Sung buttons on business suits are wheeling and dealing with foreign entrepreneurs about potential joint ventures.Capitalism has burst out in North Korea, the last and most rigid bastion of Stalinism on earth. Or at least it has burst out in this remote northeast corner of the country for this weekend, when North Korea is host to a conference aimed at luring foreign companies to invest in a free trade and economic zone it is setting up here.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,SUN FILM CRITIC | May 3, 1996
It took some nerve to conceive of the improbably pneumatic Pamela Anderson Lee as Bogart in a clone of "Casablanca," but the makers of "Barb Wire" lack no moxie.Talent, they lack.Taste? Not a lick.Sense, nowhere in sight.But nerve up the kazoo!Lee continually lists toward whichever direction her bust is aimed. With a kind of tense, plummy face and a body that appears to be morphed out of a computer hacker's most perfervid fantasy, plus 200 gallons of industrial-strength collagen hypoed into every conceivable thoracic cavity, Lee can hardly be said to act.Heck, she can hardly be said to walk.
NEWS
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,Johannesburg Bureau of The Sun | March 18, 1994
SOWETO, South Africa -- State President Frederick W. de Klerk's two impromptu walkabouts during his campaign stop in this sprawling black township were moments out of the picture-book of the new South Africa.Scores of excited residents crowded about, smiling as they strained for a glimpse of the white leader of the party that imposed apartheid and then dismantled it.Whether or not they would vote for his National Party next month was beside the point: Their president had come to call, and they were glad.
NEWS
By Kathy Lally and Kathy Lally,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | November 4, 1999
MOSCOW -- The women, babies in their arms, children at their sides, stand against the coils of barbed wire, shouting at the Russian soldiers before them in anger and desperation, crying in helplessness and fear or simply shocked into miserable silence.Behind them, perhaps 10,000 other refugees press forward, straining to escape the destruction of war-torn Chechnya. The women at the front struggle to stand up. The barbed wire tears at their skirts. The soldiers let only a few stumble through.
NEWS
By TOM HORTON | July 1, 1995
One of the oddest sights I can recall on the bay was a waterman, about this time several years ago, unrolling barbed wire from his workboat into Virginia's Rappahannock River.Back and forth he maneuvered, laying wire in grids, as if trying to fence off the river bottom.I later learned that is exactly what he was attempting. He had oyster leases there, with thousands of dollars in shellfish growing fat, he hoped, by harvest time in the fall.As he labored, great herds of a curious, oyster-loving sea creature were flapping and gliding up the bay from as far away as South America, to pass the summer mating and birthing their pups.
NEWS
By Kathy Lally and Kathy Lally,Moscow Bureau of The Sun | November 27, 1994
SARATOV, Russia -- Once the barbed-wire factory here worked two shifts a day, gears rattling, motors roaring, twisting, chopping and spooling enough shiny, spiky wire to wrap up the whole enormous Soviet Union.Now times are tough. Peace has come, the economy has gone to the devil, and the barbed wire orders that provided socially useful labor for the inmates of the Saratov penal colony are dwindling away."Yes, the world has changed," said Nikolai A. Ivanov, warden of prison colony III-382/33.
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