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By John Houser III, Special to The Baltimore Sun | July 3, 2012
The flavor of a peach in hot weather can instantly transport you back to your childhood. The peach succumbing to the pressure of your grip while the juice cascades down your chin is a tactile memory that explodes in your cortex with every first bite of the season. Peaches can be had locally from June until September, and now is a great time to start cooking with them. Peaches are normally thought of as dessert fare, but when combined with more savory items, they can be used to create a mind-blowing appetizer at your next cookout.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Kit Waskom Pollard, For The Baltimore Sun | March 19, 2014
Welcoming bars are nothing new in downtown Annapolis, and restaurants that celebrate southern food and Prohibition's repeal are nothing new anywhere anymore. But Dry 85, which opened on Main Street on the first day of 2014, combines all those things, creating something that is fun and surprisingly fresh. With a smart drinks list and food that is, for the most part, very good, it's a welcome addition the street. Scene & Decor The name Dry 85 refers to Washington D.C.'s 85 booze-free days between the repeal of Prohibition and the repeal of the Sheppard Act, which outlawed alcoholic beverages in the capital.
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FEATURES
By Joanne E. Morvay | July 15, 1998
* Item: Maker's Mark Gourmet Sauce* What you get: 15 ounces* Cost: About $8* Preparation time: A few minutes to four hours, depending on use* Review: When I asked the butcher at Sutton Place Gourmet in the Festival at Woodholme what barbecue sauce he most often recommends, he immediately picked up a bottle of this bourbon-flavored sauce imported to Maryland from a seven-generation Kentucky distillery. Though it's a little pricey to slosh on with abandon, included recipes suggest stretching the sauce by adding everything from Italian salad dressing to apple jelly.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Julie Rothman, For The Baltimore Sun | November 19, 2013
Roseanne Glick from Mount Washington was looking for the recipe for a delicious appetizer that someone brought to a potluck cocktail party recently. She said it was a water chestnut wrapped in bacon and coated with some type of a barbecue sauce. She, along with many other guests at the party, found the single-bite morsels surprisingly irresistible. Jan Warren from Havre de Grace had the very recipe Glick had described for barbecue water chestnuts. She said for fun, she sometimes calls them "pig nuts" in honor of the bacon and water chestnuts.
SPORTS
March 20, 1991
Basketball player Michael Jordan will become a sandwich Friday.The McJordan Special will be available at McDonald's franchises in the Chicago area and northwest Indiana, at least until mid-April.The new sandwich is a quarter-pound hamburger with smoked bacon, cheese, barbecue sauce, onions, mustard and pickles.
NEWS
By Carol Mighton Haddix and Carol Mighton Haddix,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | March 23, 2005
I love a good burger, but with its calorie and fat content, the classic American sandwich has become a rare indulgence. I do try to use the leanest ground meats for those times when the hankering becomes overwhelming. Recently, I looked through the cupboards and refrigerator for something to add more flavor to the lean meat. Shallots and garlic came to the rescue. Then I made a quick mustard-barbecue sauce to drizzle over the burgers. Serve these indulgences with lettuce and tomato, if you like, but you won't need any ketchup.
FEATURES
By Maria Hiaasen | January 14, 1998
* Item: Lloyd's Barbeque Sauce with Shredded Pork* Servings per package: 16* Cost: $7.79* Preparation time: 8-10 minutes to heat the full, 2-pound tub on the stove, 6-8 minutes in the microwave.* Review: If you like a barbecue sauce with bite, this is a winner. Lloyd's, a St. Paul, Minn., restaurant supplier, has combined lean shreds of pork with a tangy vinegar-and-tomato barbecue sauce. This entree comes fully cooked in a resealable tub, heats nicely ++ on the stove or in the microwave, and is low-fat to boot (90 calories per quarter-cup serving, 20 calories from fat)
NEWS
By Rob Kasper | September 17, 2000
GOOD BARBECUE sauce is like a fine perfume: It should be applied with a gentle touch; it should highlight the goods, not overpower them. So said Ardie A. Davis, a savant of sauces. He is founder of the American Royal International Barbecue Sauce Rub & Baste contest, an annual event that draws more than 400 entries from around the nation. I was surprised when I heard Davis and a number of other poobahs of barbecue discuss the fine points of their craft during a meeting last week of the Association of Food Journalists in Kansas City.
FEATURES
By Rita Calvert and Rita Calvert,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 29, 1995
It's the season for that ubiquitous cranberry condiment again. Don't think of it as just a partner to the turkey, turn it into the base of a great, yet simple barbecue sauce. Use with chicken, duck or an oriental stir-fry (add a touch of sesame oil).Purchased corn muffins bring a touch of the South to the menu. A simple frozen vegetable mixture can be zapped quickly as a side dish.Make glazed bananas for dessert.Cranberry barbecue sauced ribsServes 41 1/2 pounds boneless country-style pork ribs1/3 cup barbecue sauce of choice (tomato based)
NEWS
By Carol Mighton Haddix and Carol Mighton Haddix,Chicago Tribune | August 15, 2007
Lately I've been cooking boneless pork chops in place of the ubiquitous chicken breast. All chicken, all the time - it just gets too boring. I like to rub the chops with a mixture of salt, pepper and that great flavorful smoked paprika from Spain called pimenton. The paprika is a great match for pork of any kind. After pan-frying the chops, I add a light glaze of barbecue sauce for a touch of sweetness. Sauteed sweet onions echo the flavor of the sauce for a great side dish. Carol Mighton Haddix is food editor of the Chicago Tribune, which provided the recipe analysis.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 30, 2013
From: Napa Valley Price: $22 Serve with: Barbecued ribs, pasta, pizza This full-bodied red wine epitomizes the Napa style of zinfandel. Not peppery and explosive like its better Sonoma brethren, it emphasizes bright, pure, penetrating fruit and flavors of black cherry and cassis. While dry, it has so much fruit flavor it gives the impression of sweetness in a way that will let it stand up to a barbecue sauce. There are also notes of Asian spices and chocolate that add to its complexity.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John Houser III, Special to The Baltimore Sun | July 3, 2012
The flavor of a peach in hot weather can instantly transport you back to your childhood. The peach succumbing to the pressure of your grip while the juice cascades down your chin is a tactile memory that explodes in your cortex with every first bite of the season. Peaches can be had locally from June until September, and now is a great time to start cooking with them. Peaches are normally thought of as dessert fare, but when combined with more savory items, they can be used to create a mind-blowing appetizer at your next cookout.
NEWS
May 18, 2012
Sunday, May 20 Science talk Author Andrea Wulf discusses her new book, "Chasing Venus," at noon at Adkins Arboretum's Visitor's Center, 12610 Eveland Road in Ridgely. Admission is $20, $15 for members. Information: 410-634-2847 or adkinsarboretum.org. Lecture Historic Annapolis' St. Clair Wright Lecture Series will feature an illustrated talk by Andrea Wulf, author of "Founding Gardeners: The Revolutionary Generation, Nature and the Shaping of the American Nation," at 6 p.m. at St. Anne's Church on Church Circle.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kit Waskom Pollard, Special To The Baltimore Sun | May 11, 2012
Timothy Dean may have finally found his niche - and it's at the mall. Last month, the chef, best known in Baltimore for his string of restaurants on Eastern Avenue (and his appearance on the seventh season of "Top Chef"), opened Timothy Dean Burger in the Boulevard at the Capital Centre. The vibe is fast food, but the food - burgers, fries and gourmet pizzas - is worthy of white tablecloths. Over the past few years, the celebrity chef has weathered a string of well-publicized setbacks.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John Lindner, Special To The Baltimore Sun | January 15, 2012
An Poitin Stil offers the least expensive bison burger I've seen in these parts, at a penny under 10 bucks. I planned to check it out during this trip to the Timonium Irish pub. But then I saw the Backyard BBQ Burger ($8.99). The Backyard offers two types of cheeses, bacon, caramelized onions and homemade barbecue sauce for a dollar less than the bison burger. Those extras can cost you 75 cents apiece if you add them to the Stil's bison or angus burger. To keep this meal under $10 and still enjoy the civilizing effects of cheese and bacon, the Backyard was an easy choice.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John Houser III, Special To The Baltimore Sun | November 16, 2011
Mission BBQ celebrates America, from its heroes — firefighters, soldiers, police — to its food — barbecue. With a familiar restaurant concept, a handsome interior design and a short menu, Mission BBQ is a welcome change of pace in chain restaurant-heavy Glen Burnie. While not bad, the barbecue could be better. Still, it's a concept you could see expanding to other counties, and eventually, states. Mission BBQ feels familiar in a fast casual way. It's set up like a Chipotle or Qdoba — you order at a cash register and wait for your food at a pick-up station.
NEWS
By MICHAEL DRESSER | June 29, 2005
2003 Murphy-Goode "Liar's Dice" Zinfandel, Sonoma County ($20). This lush, decadent, powerful California red wine is not for the faint of palate. If brawn and high alcohol offend you, avoid it. But if you like a wine with big shoulders and a complex mix of flavors -- blackberry, black raspberry, black pepper, herbs, smoked meat and barbecue sauce -- it could be right up your alley. The 14.5 percent alcohol is well-concealed by the wine's abundant fruit. Serve the zinfandel with food that can fight back: barbecue, grilled steak or lamb, or pasta with a rich tomato-based sauce.
NEWS
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Special to the Sun | January 27, 2002
My 30-something son loves all sports, but football is his favorite. Much to his wife's chagrin, he spends hours in front of the television watching his favorite teams do battle on the gridiron during fall and early winter. For him, the game to end all games is, of course, the Super Bowl, and since he is quite gregarious he turns this event into a social occasion. A talented amateur cook, he invites friends to come watch the match and serves supper during the half time. A few days before this major sports affair, I often get a phone call from Michael asking for menu suggestions.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | September 16, 2011
Throughout the 2011 NFL season, Langermann's in Canton is offering game-day specials inspired by the Ravens' doomed opponents. Eating one's enemies, as it were. For Week 1, against the Pittsburgh Steelers, Neal Langermann served a Devonshire sandwich, inspired by the LeMont restaurant. The original consists is composed of crisp bacon and chicken placed on a single piece of toast and then covered with a rich creamy cheese sauce. For this Sunday's game against Memphis, Langermann served Eggs Memphis, a twist on the traditional Eggs Benedict using pulled pork in Jack Daniel's barbecue sauce.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John Houser III, Special To The Baltimore Sun | August 10, 2011
Walk into Kloby's Smokehouse, and the first thing you notice is the smell. The rich aroma of meat being smoked for barbecue hangs thick in the air. It's a hint of what lies ahead, and part of the reason why this popular Laurel restaurant recently had to expand. The barbecue here is good. Really good. Opened only two months ago, Kloby's new restaurant and bar is attached to the old bar and carryout. The orange-and-yellow walls are adorned with TVs and firefighter regalia (the owner was formerly a firefighter)
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