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NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 5, 2002
COTOPAXI, Colo. - Investigators were pursuing reports yesterday that a barbecue grill left unattended by a group of off-road driving enthusiasts was responsible for a fire that has consumed 100 homes and more than 100 other structures. Witnesses told authorities that several people were driving four-wheel-drive vehicles Sunday on private land near subdivisions in the hilly area around Canon City, about 130 miles southwest of Denver. The group stopped for a cookout, and investigators believe that their grill was left behind or that high winds blew it over and sprayed white-hot charcoal briquettes into the surrounding forest.
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NEWS
September 21, 2007
Woman is struck with barbecue grill man assaulted a city woman with a barbecue grill, Annapolis police said yesterday. The 40-year-old Newtowne Drive resident reported at 9:50 p.m. Wednesday that a friend of her daughter picked up a barbecue grill and struck her in the head with it, causing a large bump on her head. After hitting her with the grill in the first block of College Creek Terrace, the man punched her in the back of the head, then fled on foot. The victim said she had argued with her daughter earlier and that it prompted the grill attack.
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NEWS
February 3, 1993
Barbecue coals blamed for fire in Severna ParkHot coals from a barbecue grill that blew over during a windstorm Monday morning caused a fire that heavily damaged a Severna Park home, a fire spokesman said.A family of four escaped without injury, but four of the five cats living in the home in the 300 block of Gordon Ave. died. The fifth was seriously injured.Damage was estimated at $80,000 to the two-story home and $70,000 for the contents. "Virtually all their contents were destroyed," said Capt.
NEWS
By Rob Kasper | May 25, 2005
IT IS ONE OF those arguments like sailboats vs. powerboats or stick shifts vs. automatic transmissions or the American League vs. the National. The question of what to burn in your barbecue grill -- live fire or gas -- is highly charged, producing more heat and hilarity than light. The facts in this debate are on the periphery, "sides" as they say in barbecue joints. Attitude is front and center. The live-fire boys, and this is mainly a male matter, contend that their practice of manipulating flames for the benefit of mankind links them with Prometheus, the Titan in Greek mythology who stole fire from the gods.
NEWS
September 21, 2007
Woman is struck with barbecue grill man assaulted a city woman with a barbecue grill, Annapolis police said yesterday. The 40-year-old Newtowne Drive resident reported at 9:50 p.m. Wednesday that a friend of her daughter picked up a barbecue grill and struck her in the head with it, causing a large bump on her head. After hitting her with the grill in the first block of College Creek Terrace, the man punched her in the back of the head, then fled on foot. The victim said she had argued with her daughter earlier and that it prompted the grill attack.
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | January 11, 1995
There is more than one way to shuck an oyster. The other night I experimented with a new oyster-opening technique. I plopped half a dozen of them on the barbecue grill.The results were mixed. They did open their shells. But not widely. And rather than flavorful oysters, swimming in their juices, I ended up with cooked oysters, sizzling in their dry shells.This was partly my fault, and partly the fault of the oysters.Let's start with the oysters. They were shy. When the fire heated them up, they did not throw their shells open in dramatic style.
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | May 25, 1994
Try as I might to live a varied, interesting life, I often end up being a Johnny-one-note. Instead of making a variety of thrilling new foods, I get hooked on one particular item, and ride it until it limps.Lately I have been on a banana binge. I have been cooking those suckers on the barbecue grill. Why? Well, in part because it had been a long time -- almost two years -- since I had grilled a banana and I wanted to see if I could still do it. Not only was grilling a banana a challenge, it was my kind of challenge.
FEATURES
By Rob Kasper | March 6, 1996
SNOW. SNOW. Snow. Cold. Cold. Cold.We're sick of this weather. Sick. Sick. Sick.For weeks we have tried to cope with winter by holing up in the kitchen. By making pots of soup. By baking loaves of bread. By drinking bottles of red wine, lots of red wine.The time has come to take more aggressive action. The time has come to light some fires. The time has come to try backyard warming.This is my plan. Every man, woman and child in Maryland should grab every barbecue grill, hibachi, or smoker they can get their hands on and carry them out to their back yards.
NEWS
By ROGER SIMON | June 29, 1992
"You really shouldn't do that."That is Eugene talking. I am ignoring him."It is very dangerous. Really."Eugene is correct. Eugene is almost always correct. That is why he has so few friends."It could explode. I am not kidding," Eugene says.As he says this, I squirt more lighter fluid onto the hot coals inthe barbecue grill.You are never, ever supposed to squirt lighter fluid onto hot coals in your barbecue grill. Because when you do a huge fireball whooshes up and just about takes your eyebrows off.It is the part of barbecuing I like best.
FEATURES
By Rob Kasper | March 9, 1997
CULTIVATING AN asparagus bed, like developing a top-quality major-league pitcher, requires at least several years of slow work. But every spring, fans get anxious for results. As soon as baseballs begin flying through the air, we want asparagus stalks to start pushing out of the soil. In Maryland, baseball usually arrives on the scene several weeks ahead of the local asparagus. So we make do with substitute stalks, flown in from warmer climes.The annual return of fresh asparagus is a news-making event, a cause for celebration, a rite of spring.
NEWS
By Susan Reimer and Susan Reimer,SUN STAFF | February 2, 2005
This Super Bowl Sunday, bring your tailgate in out of the cold - grill and all. Ribs, burgers, fresh sausages, vegetable kebabs. Even dessert. You can grill them all without leaving the cozy comfort of your kitchen - or the game on TV. Thanks to indoor grills - both stove-top and countertop - barbecuing is now a year-round pleasure. And you won't run out of propane or charcoal. "It is about having the experience of cooking as if you are outside," said Marco Beghin, product marketing manager for DeLonghi, which sold 11 million electric countertop grills in 2003.
NEWS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,SUN STAFF | June 19, 2002
The first ripe tomato of the season is like a shiny jewel, but by summer's end, an overabundance of tomatoes may cause them to lose some of their luster. Here are some ideas from the Florida Tomatoes Committee: Make a BLT in a bowl. Bathe cubes of Italian bread and tomatoes in prepared Italian dressing, serve on a bed of shredded lettuce and sprinkle with bacon bits. Create a "tomato fiesta salad" by combining diced tomatoes, black beans, corn kernels and coleslaw mix with a zesty citrus salad dressing.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 5, 2002
COTOPAXI, Colo. - Investigators were pursuing reports yesterday that a barbecue grill left unattended by a group of off-road driving enthusiasts was responsible for a fire that has consumed 100 homes and more than 100 other structures. Witnesses told authorities that several people were driving four-wheel-drive vehicles Sunday on private land near subdivisions in the hilly area around Canon City, about 130 miles southwest of Denver. The group stopped for a cookout, and investigators believe that their grill was left behind or that high winds blew it over and sprayed white-hot charcoal briquettes into the surrounding forest.
NEWS
By Rob Kasper | November 19, 2000
YEARS AGO, when I was a wise and worldly college student, I remarked that the good thing about going home at Thanksgiving was that it reminded you of where you came from, and why you left. Now that I am a parent of a college student, the situation has shifted. Now I am, in the eyes of my offspring, one of the old fogeys at home. While I don't think there is much that can be done to change that assessment, there are steps that can be taken to ease the interaction between young and old, between white-meat lovers and dark-meat eaters, between the sweet-potato sorts and the creamed-onion contingent.
NEWS
By Annette Gooch and Annette Gooch,Universal Press Syndicate | July 11, 1999
There's nothing canned about fresh tuna. With a full, rich flavor and dense, meaty texture, tuna, like swordfish, salmon and other oily-fleshed fish, stays moist and tender when cooked over direct heat.With more and more of the prime commercial catch being marketed in fresh or frozen form rather than going to the canneries, several species of tuna steaks and fillets are becoming more widely available and often are an excellent value. Albacore, a relatively small, pale-fleshed species, is one of the most popular tuna "sea steaks" for char-grilling.
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd | May 6, 1999
ONE OF THE few joys left to a man of my age is the purchase of a new barbecue grill.As a man reaches his mid-40s, life becomes an endless series of bill-paying, prostate exams and run-ins with the smart-mouth Marilyn Manson disciple behind the register at 7-Eleven. So the prospect of a new grill becomes an exciting, shimmering glow in your mind, the same way a new Corvette was when you were 22.The other thing was this: My old grill, a Weber kettle from the time of the Iran-contra hearings, was a rusted hulk.
FEATURES
August 27, 1995
It was one of those days when it was too hot to cook indoors. In Maryland these days are usually called August.It seemed like a good time to try cooking an entire meal outside on the barbecue grill. The hotter it gets the more I get the urge to start a fire in the back yard. I am not alone in this view. On any given evening in August, perhaps Maryland's hottest month, back yards are alive with the scent of something burning.Usually it is just charcoal. Sometimes dinner is aflame. More often than not, it is the man of the house who is responsible for the smoke.
FEATURES
By Dave Barry and Dave Barry,Knight Ridder/Tribune | June 28, 1998
THIS YEAR, WHY NOT hold an old-fashioned Fourth of July picnic?Food poisoning is one good reason. After a few hours in the sun, ordinary potato salad can develop bacteria the size of raccoons. But don't let the threat of an agonizingly painful death prevent you from celebrating the birth of our nation, just as Americans have been doing ever since that historic first July Fourth when our Founding Fathers -- George Washington, Benjamin Franklin, Thomas Jefferson, Bob Dole and Tony Bennett -- landed on Plymouth Rock.
FEATURES
By Steven Raichlen and Steven Raichlen,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | December 27, 1998
As the days grow shorter and the temperature drops, Americans pack up their barbecue grills for winter. But grilling is still a fine cold-weather cooking method.Especially when you do it indoors.This truth was brought home to me during a visit to the North Stonington, Conn., home of Randall's Ordinary, a country inn that specializes in hearthside cookery.The innkeeper, Bill Foakes, recently served a dinner of squash soup simmered in a cast-iron caldron, corn bread cooked in a spider (a cast-iron skillet with legs)
FEATURES
By Dave Barry and Dave Barry,Knight Ridder/Tribune | June 28, 1998
THIS YEAR, WHY NOT hold an old-fashioned Fourth of July picnic?Food poisoning is one good reason. After a few hours in the sun, ordinary potato salad can develop bacteria the size of raccoons. But don't let the threat of an agonizingly painful death prevent you from celebrating the birth of our nation, just as Americans have been doing ever since that historic first July Fourth when our Founding Fathers -- George Washington, Benjamin Franklin, Thomas Jefferson, Bob Dole and Tony Bennett -- landed on Plymouth Rock.
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